Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 06, February 8

A Doctor Disagrees
Byline: Robert Klitzman Antidepressants have helped not only my patients, but myself. The TV screen stayed black. Except for the occasional car whishing by outside, the room was silent. I stared at the white ceiling, unable to get out of bed....
A New Jim Crow?
Byline: Ellis Cose The tragedy of America's jails. In certain quarters, euphoria greeted Barack Obama's inauguration. Finally America had its post-partisan prince, an elegant figure, full of hope, who would redefine Washington and reclaim America's...
Electric Company
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh and David Ansen Six actors. One room. A conversation so intimate, we were even invited to tag along for potty breaks. Welcome to NEWSWEEK's 13th Oscar Roundtable. Morgan, you are 72 years old and the only one here who already...
Follow the Leader
Byline: Anna Quindlen We elected him to do the right thing--not take dictation. By the time the current political cycle is over, the term "populist" will have become a buzzword so misused and abused that it will be leached of all real meaning....
Giving Up on Human Rights in China and Beyond
Byline: Joshua Kurlantzick Since taking office, the Obama administration has followed a much quieter approach to human-rights advocacy than its predecessors. From its engagement with the brutal Burmese junta to its initial silence over the protests...
God and Wall Street
Byline: Rowan Williams It is quite striking that, in the Gospel parables, Jesus more than once uses economics as a framework for his stories: the parable of the talents, the dishonest steward--even, we might say, the vignette of the lost coin. Like...
Great Speech. Now What?
Byline: Howard Fineman Obama and the limits of personal oratory. Barack Obama believes in the power of heroic narrative. As a teenager he loved the comic-book exploits of Conan the Barbarian and Spider-Man; as an adult he wrote a best-selling...
Heaven Help Him
Byline: Lisa Miller Religious centrists bail on Obama. When Barack Oba-ma was running for president, an outfit called Matthew 25 helped him get elected. Through ads and outreach, this group convinced legions of moderate evangelicals that Obama...
In iPad We Trust
Byline: Daniel Lyons Why Apple's tablet isn't the second coming--yet. Why do we invest so much hope in new technology? What do we expect these devices will do for us, and why are we so disappointed when the Next Big Thing turns out to be just...
The Depressing News about Antidepressants
Byline: Sharon Begley Studies suggest that the popular drugs are no more effective than a placebo. In fact, they may be worse. Although the year is young, it has already brought my first moral dilemma. In early January a friend mentioned that...
The Perils of Prosperity
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The problem isn't that the economy occasionally goes bust. It's that it doesn't go bust often enough. We need to get the story straight. Already, a crude consensus has formed over what caused the financial crisis....
The View from the Bench
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why judges should get personal. Two legal swan songs recently crash-landed on my desk, each a study in the judicial mind. The first was Justice John Paul Stevens's remarkable 90-page dissent in Citizens United v. FEC--the...
The Wisdom of Crowds
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Daniel Gross When populist rage leads to smart policy. John Dingell is one of the few people in Washington who remembers the last time so much populist anger gripped the country. It was early 1933, the worst year of...
Visions from a Vanishing World
Byline: Jon Meacham The death of J. D. Salinger last Wednesday understandably brought a great deal of what Holden Caulfield called "that David Copperfield kind of crap" about the author: "where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and...
Wall Street's Fishbowl
Byline: Daniel Gross How banks brought on the scrutiny. The surviving investment banks are bristling at efforts aimed at recouping taxpayer losses and forestalling a repeat of the panic of 2008: congressional proposals to tax bonuses, President...
Well, Hello Again, Ike
Byline: George F. Will But all this is in the subjunctive mood. Bill Clinton had been president for just 78 days--it was April 7, 1993--and he was crimson with frustration. As recounted by Bob Woodward in The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White...
Who You Callin' Rogue?
Byline: Nader Mousavizadeh How 'rogue' countries like North Korea and Iran have become our rivals' new best friends. A year after Barack Obama relaunched America's relations with the world's rogue states, the verdict is in: from Burma to North...