Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 09, March 1

Budget Gourmet
Byline: Julia Reed Just after new year's, I was having a festive drink with my friends Rod and Joyce when the talk turned--as the talk so often does these days--to budgets. I mentioned that I had never in my life made one until now, a fact that...
But What Does It Mean?
Byline: Peter Plagens There's a double-gallery exhibition still up in New York called The Visible Vagina. It's another one of those didactic anthology shows purporting to bring some issue that artists think regular folk have either thought about...
Don't Scramble the Jets
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Why Iran's dictators can be deterred. Sarah Palin has a suggestion for how Barack Obama can save his presidency. "Say he decided to declare war on Iran," she said on Fox News last week. "I think people would perhaps shift...
Google's Orwell Moment
Byline: Daniel Lyons On the Web, privacy has its price. Google recently introduced a new service that adds social-networking features to its popular Gmail system. The service is called Buzz, and within hours of its release, people were howling...
Greece Is Far from the EU's Only Joker
Byline: Stefan Theil First there was Enron; then, subprime. Now it turns out that some governments have been just as adept at using financial alchemy to hide debts. Take Greece, a country with a $350 billion national debt that is now under investigation...
History in the Remaking
Byline: Patrick Symmes A temple complex in turkey that predates even the pyramids is rewriting the story of human evolution. They call it potbelly hill, after the soft, round contour of this final lookout in southeastern Turkey. To the north...
How Swede It Is
Byline: Jennie Yabroff The Swedish film let the right One In is set during a Nordic winter so bleak that just watching it practically makes your nose run. The two main characters--a lonely, ostracized boy and the creepy, bedraggled girl who befriends...
How the GOP Sees It
Byline: Katie Connolly, Michael Hirsh, and Weston Kosova What Republicans would do if given carte blanche to run the country. "We've offered to work with the president all year. We've been shut out, shut out, and shut out." --House GOP leader...
Iceberg Ahead
Byline: Fred Guterl Climate scientists who play fast and loose with the facts are imperiling not just their profession but the planet. One of the most impressive visuals in Al Gore's now famous slide show on global warming is a graph known as...
Meet Team Taliban
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai By all accounts, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar will be virtually impossible to replace. Until his recent capture in Karachi by U.S. and Pakistani forces, the Taliban's master strategist was working 18-hour days....
Minority Report
Byline: Evan Thomas and Pat Wingert American universities are accepting more minorities than ever. Graduating them is another matter. Barry Mills, the president of Bowdoin College, was justifiably proud of Bowdoin's efforts to recruit minority...
Red Alert
Byline: Paul Ryan As Obama's national-debt panel prepares for deliberations, one congressman proposes how to get back in the black. Imagine your family's finances if you spent and borrowed like Washington: you'd owe $60 in credit-card loans for...
R.I.P. on Facebook
Byline: Lisa Miller The uses and abuses of virtual grief. Minutes after news broke that the British fashion designer Alexander McQueen was dead, a suicide at age 40, the prayers and condolences started pouring in. More than 80,000 people became...
Stay out of It, Mr. President
Byline: Ezra Klein You're Only Deepening the Divide. The spin on Thursday's White House health-care summit is that it marks a return to politics as it should be practiced: the president leading the legislative process, the two parties talking...
The Accidental Senator
Byline: Ted Kaufman For more than 35 years, my life has been intertwined with Congress. But I had always worked in the legislative wings, serving first as a volunteer on Joe Biden's 1972 Senate campaign, then as his longtime chief of staff, and...
The Fleeting Beauty of Opposition
Byline: Jon Meacham History can be a problem. if you spend a lot of time thinking about the political past, you tend to see the events of the present time differently than you do if you are consumed by the passions of the hour. A habit of mind that...
The Incredible Shrinking Continent
Byline: Stefan Theil Europe is on track to lose 52 million workers between now and 2050--unless it begins embracing immigrants fast. You'd never guess it from the rants of America's talk-radio Jeremiahs, but U.S. immigration policy isn't really...
The Real Greek Tragedy
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Why this is just the opening act. It would be possible in other circumstances to disregard the ongoing story of Greece and its debts as a tedious tale of financial markets. But there's much more to it than that. What's...
The Snitch in Your Pocket
Byline: Michael Isikoff Law enforcement is tracking Americans' cell phones in real time--without the benefit of a warrant. Amid all the furor over the Bush administration's warrantless wiretapping program a few years ago, a mini-revolt was brewing...
West Brain, East Brain
Byline: Sharon Begley What a difference culture makes. By now, it should come as no surprise when scientists discover yet another case of experience changing the brain. From the sensory information we absorb to the movements we make, our lives...