Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 20, November 14

A Dictator's Second Act
Byline: Mike Giglio; With Fasih Ahmed, Eli Lake, And R. M. Schneiderman Pakistan's Pervez Musharraf wants back into politics. Should the U.S. be wary? Three years ago, Gen. Pervez Musharraf was president of Pakistan, charged with the world's...
Art's Big Brain
Byline: Blake Gopnik Three years into running the great met museum, Thomas Campbell proves he's not dumbing it down. Thomas Campbell, the director of the Metropolitan Museum in New York, might count as the ultimate egghead. When he first came...
Becoming Marilyn
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh How Michelle Williams wiggled and wept her way into the soul of hollywood's greatest icon. For Michelle Williams, playing Marilyn Monroe in the new film My Week With Marilyn was like building a house. She had to start with...
Chris Matthews
Byline: Lloyd Grove The 'Hardball' host talks about his new JFK book, why Hillary Clinton makes him giggle, and why Nixon made him cry. Was it at all intimidating to write Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero? These are hardly uncharted waters. Let me...
Don't Let Chaos Get You Down
Byline: Dr. Andrew Weil You aren't depressed; our brains just aren't equipped for 21st-century life. In my experience, the more people have, the less likely they are to be contented. Indeed, there is abundant evidence that depression is a "disease...
How to Break Up with Your Bank
Byline: Jean Chatzky After consumers raged, some banks are trying to beat a quick retreat from hidden fees. Still unhappy? Here's how to switch. Consumer fury may have some banks rethinking their new debit-card fees for now, but rest assured...
John Edwards' Last Desperate Gamble
Byline: David Margolick How do you defend an indefensible man? Start by enumerating his sins. Inside the upcoming trial, and why the disgraced former candidate decided to go for broke. As the disgraced former presidential candidate John Edwards...
My Favorite Mistake
Jeremy Irons on lighting up next to Princess Diana. For most of my life, apart from a few lengthy periods during which I have stopped, just to make sure I still can, I have enjoyed smoking my hand-rolled cigarettes. Twenty-five years ago, while...
Stop! You Can't Afford It
Byline: Sharon Begley With Jean Chatzky New science unveils how your brain is hard-wired when it comes to spending-and how you can reboot it. Like many colleges, Washington University in St. Louis offers children of its faculty free tuition....
The Arab Autumn
Byline: Stephen L. Carter Tyrants have fallen. Elections have begun. Does America have the stomach to stand up for freedom once again? It is autumn now in the Arab Spring. The protests that began last December when a Tunisian street vendor set...
The Greatest Political Rivalries
Byline: David A. Graham With the Republican presidential contest growing testier by the day, here's a look at the most quarrelsome relationships in politics. MITT ROMNEY VS. RICK PERRY Forget Ronald Reagan's famous commandment against GOP...
The Hottest Ticket in Town
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh After the box-office hit 'real steel,' Hugh Jackman is creating a frenzy (again) on broadway. There's something about watching Hugh Jackman on Broadway that makes grown women (and a few men) behave like 13-year-olds at...
The Hypocrites
Byline: Daniel Stone Guess what the conservatives who brought the nation to the brink of default this summer do in their spare time? Ask for government handouts. A Newsweek investigation into Tea Party pork. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor,...
The Princess Who Tweets for Saudi Women
In an exclusive interview, Ameerah Al-Taweel on why the kingdom's women won't accept a reversal on equal rights. by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon While much of the Arab Middle East has been convulsed by revolutionary change over the past year, Saudi Arabia's...
The Texan Who Couldn't Shoot Straight
Byline: Paul Begala Rick Perry came roaring out of the gate, but now his campaign is sinking. Here's what he's done wrong. See, I told ya. You laughed when I said Rick Perry was the candidate for those who thought George W. Bush was too cerebral....
Versace on A Budget
Byline: Jacob Bernstein The queen of Italy's blingiest fashion house takes her creations to H&M. times have changed. It's 3:30 on a recent Friday afternoon at an atelier in Milan, and Donatella Versace is fashionably late for her own photo...
'Zionism Has Run Its Course'
Byline: Rula Jebreal These startling words were uttered last week in Tel Aviv by 95-year-old ruth dayan, widow of one of Israel's founding fathers Elegantly dressed and perfectly made up, Ruth Dayan, 95, receives me with a wide smile in her Tel...