Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 12

A Big Vote for Cold Showers; Conventional Wisdom Has It That India's Reforms Hurt Hundreds of Millions of Villagers. It's a Powerful Case-Except That It's Not True
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Recalling his first memory of India's new prime minister, Manmohan Singh, 50 years ago, fellow economist Jagdish Bhagwati says: "We were both students at Cambridge University,...
A Foul Mouth and Manhood; in Recent Years the Republican Hard Guys Have Surely Taken over the Y-Chromosome Territory from the Feel-Your-Pain Democrats
Byline: Anna Quindlen In 1962, when the New York Times quoted President John F. Kennedy during a dispute with the steel industry as saying, "My father always told me that all businessmen were sons of bitches, but I never believed it till now," the...
A 'Smile' Worth the Wait; Four Decades Late: Brian Wilson's Masterpiece
Byline: Malcolm Jones I'm sitting in a huge sound-stage in Burbank, Calif., and I've got a serious case of the willies. First off, I still can't believe what I'm seeing: Brian Wilson, fronting a 10-piece band, poised to launch into a rehearsal of...
By the Seat of His Pants; No One Knows Economic Statistics Better Than Alan Greenspan, but He Must Make Many Fateful Decisions without the Benefit of Hard Data
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson It's Alan Greenspan's swan song. The Federal Reserve raised interest rates last week, as expected. The overnight Fed funds rate went from 1 percent, the lowest since the late 1950s, to 1.25 percent. Over the next year...
Confessions of a Personal Trainer; I'm a Lonely Wife's Dream, and Hubby's Worst Nightmare
Byline: Mike Torchia, Mike Torchia, who is divorced, is a Hollywood trainer and has earned the nickname "The Torchinator." In 30 years in the training business, I've probably had affairs with more than 40 married women. Most of them were in their...
Handling the Rate Hike
Byline: Linda Stern Alan Greenspan made his move last week; now it's your turn. Oh, sure, you could just sit back and watch the rates rise on your home-equity line and your credit cards while your 401(k) slides sideways. Or you could get busy, preparing...
Homesick for Texas; Alberto Gonzales Left a Good Life to Become White House Counsel. amid a Series of Legal Setbacks, He's Wondering Why
Byline: Daniel Klaidman, With Tamara Lipper White House counsel Alberto Gonzales loved his old life in Texas. He had a coveted appointment to the state Supreme Court and a nice house in a pretty Austin neighborhood. When George W. Bush went to Washington,...
Hot for Student: A Teacher on Trial
Byline: Catharine Skipp and Arian Campo-Flores When the 14-year-old student told his cousin that a "hot teacher" at his Tampa, Fla., middle school liked him, his cousin didn't believe it. So the student decided to prove it. He arranged for the two...
'I Cannot Be Charted'; Stop Pandering. Start Reaching out. A Young Voter Lets Fly
Byline: Traci E. Carpenter, Carpenter, a senior at Michigan State University, is the winner of an essay contest for college journalists sponsored by NEWSWEEK and MTVU, MTV's college channel. I am the youth vote. And I'm tired of being preached at,...
Judgement Days; the New Iraqi Government Wanted to Prove Itself by Publicly Confronting Saddam. It'll Have to Do Better Next Time
Byline: Rod Nordland and Babak Dehghanpisheh Saddam glanced at the television cameras in the courtroom, and panic flickered briefly in his eyes. It was his first appearance in public since he was dragged out of a spider hole last December, when...
Kicking into High Gear; Pedal to Medal: Drafting Behind Bush Has Worked-So Far. but It's Time Kerry Made His Move. the Plan for July
Byline: Howard Fineman, With Richard Wolffe in Washington and T. Trent Gegax with Kerry The Heinz family estate, north of Pittsburgh, is rustic baronial: 90 acres of rolling farmland, woods and streams, crowned by a columned white mansion with swimming...
Knight of the Living Dead; This Listless 'King Arthur' Even Lacks a Love Triangle
Byline: Marc Peyser Some movies are director's films. Others are star vehicles, or even writer's films. "King Arthur" is that rarest of summer blockbusters--a weatherman's film. The opening shot shows Arthur (Clive Owen) and his posse on horseback,...
Meet the Eye Cam; Processed Reflections from the Cornea Can Make Hindsight a Reality
Byline: Steven Levy Our precious peepers are valued primarily for one crucial function: letting us see. But eyes can also be a source of information to those observing them, mostly by giving intuitive clues to emotions or intentions. And now two...
Needed: More Soldiers, More Billions
Byline: Michael Hirsh and T. Trent Gegax Publicly, the Pentagon insists it's getting the manpower and money it needs for Iraq and Afghanistan. But as those conflicts drag on, Army planners are privately growing more worried about a looming crisis....
Newsmakers
Byline: Allison Samuels, Susannah Meadows, Devin Gordon Q&A: Jay-Z We were afraid Jay-Z's retirement from making albums had been a bad idea when we heard he was selling his shoes. Turns out he's auctioning a pair of his own S. Carter Reeboks...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources From Top To Bottom, Left To Right: Associated Press, New York Daily News, The Washington Post, Associated Press, CNN.Com, Reuters, Associated Press, The Washington Post, People Magazine, The Washington Post "Let freedom...
Service with a Smile, and Plenty of Metal; I Can't Help Shuddering and Averting My Eyes When I Find Myself Staring at a Face Full of Hoops and Studs
Byline: Debra Darvick, Darvick is a writer living in Birmingham, Mich. When I can read the latte menu through the hole in my server's earlobe, something is seriously out of whack. The first time I saw this I nearly blew my lunch into the tip jar....
The Art of Idiocy; Will Ferrell's Gift for Making Us Warm to the Pompous, Clueless Egotists He Plays Makes Him Hollywood's Hottest Comic. So How Seriously Does He Take Himself?
Byline: Sean Smith "I just love white male American jackasses," Will Ferrell says. Which is so sweet, because they love him right back. A recent Harvard study concluded that every 15 seconds a frat boy pops a beer and quotes one of Ferrell's lines...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker The three women who spearheaded this week's story on female infidelity--editor Lisa Miller, writer Lorraine Ali and reporter Holly Peterson --all initially approached the subject with mixed feelings. Although intrigued by...
The Junior Varsity; Game On: They're Young. They're Dialed-In. and They Could Prove the Difference This Fall. Tapping the Youth Vote
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz, With Sarah Childress and Rebecca Sinderbrand; Paul Tolme in Westminster, Colo.; Elise Soukup in Moorhead, Minn., and Robina Riccitiello in Berkeley Taryn Mann made her political debut a few weeks ago in a half-lit back...
The Lions' Reign; When Disney Wouldn't Let Miramax Distribute 'Fahrenheit 9/11,' a Once Tiny Canadian Studio Took Up the Charge. How Lions Gate Became the Indie That Roared
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts The opening shot of Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 9/11" isn't an image of a clueless President Bush. It's a logo: a stylized drawing of the constellation Leo the Lion, the emblem of the film's distributor, and it's getting...
The Power of a Word; Thousands Are Dying in Sudan. Is It Genocide or Not?
Byline: Tom Masland and Holly Bailey The venue was the message. Still, in case the point somehow escaped anyone in the crowd at Washington's Holocaust Memorial Museum, the rally's organizers pounded the word relentlessly: "Genocide!" They were talking...
The Secret Lives of Wives; Why They Stray: With the Work Place and the Internet, Overscheduled Lives and Inattentive Husbands-It's No Wonder More American Women Are Looking for Comfort in the Arms of Another Man
Byline: Lorraine Ali and Lisa Miller, With Vanessa Juarez, Holly Peterson, Karen Springen, Claire Sulmers, William Lee Adams and Raina Kelley When groups of women get together, especially if they're mothers and have been married for more than six...
The Smell of Success; Hog Farms Stink. but the Neighbors Are Rising Up
Byline: Dirk Johnson and Vince Kuppig It started as a joyous Easter egg hunt on the Nebraska prairie. But when the winds shifted, it stunk so badly of hog manure the kids ran indoors. "Oh Grandma," one of the little girls cried to Kathleen Stephens,...
Why 'Brother' Stays Big; It Gets-And Deserves-No Respect. but It's a Survivor
Byline: Marc Peyser Crowning the crudest reality-TV show is like singling out the sleaziest politician--once they're rolling and splashing in the gutter, does it really matter who's in the deepest? Still, that didn't stop the Parents Television...