Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 31

2005 Oscar Roundtable; on Jan. 15, We Gathered the Most Celebrated Actors of the Season for an Intimate Talk about the Pains and Joys of a Life in Pictures
Byline: Sean Smith and David Ansen When Kate Winslet is happy to see someone, she's not shy about it. As soon as Leonardo DiCaprio walked through the door, his "Titanic" costar gave him a full-body hug, then jumped up and wrapped her legs around...
A Click Away: Internet TV; after Years of Promises, Companies Are Starting to Deliver the Picture
Byline: Michael Hastings Mark Gray thinks that the future of television lies in giving couch potatoes less, not more. "You can plug in your cable box and get 500 channels, most of which you're not interested in," he says. It's an odd thing for the...
Affirmative Action: Making the Grade?
Byline: Pat Wingert Is affirmative action actually boosting the number of minorities graduating with a degree? Two new studies show that minority graduation rates remain one of higher education's dirty little secrets. In this month's Stanford Law...
A Gold Mine in Low Fund Fees; If You're Smart Enough to Save on Broker Fees for Your Mutual Funds, You Can Retire after 30 Years of Low-Cost Investing with 64 Percent More
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Hey there, fans of mutual funds. How would you like to make 2 percent more on your money each year, compounding into tens of thousands of dollars when you retire? No muss, no fuss,...
An Afterwar in Waco; Plans to Shutter a Veterans Hospital in Texas Are Put on Hold amid a Political Storm in Bush's Backyard
Byline: T. Trent Gegax In his five months in Iraq, Army Spc. Charlie Perdue saw his share of violence. One day stands out. It was when a car came barreling toward the checkpoint he was manning in Bayji. Perdue and others opened fire, riddling the...
British Invasion; Detroit's Brawny New Look Seems All-American. but Many Hot Designers Hail from across the Pond
Byline: Keith Naughton (With Sarah Sennott in London) Nestled away in England's bleak industrial midlands, General Motors car designers toil in obscurity in a nondescript studio. Unlike the automaker's Detroit design center--a postmodern architectural...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Planning on living on your savings and investments when you retire? Whether you make it depends not only on how much money you have. You also need a withdrawal plan that lasts a lifetime. Different strategies lead to widely...
Dependent on the Kindness of Strangers; with No Help from Her Family or the State, It Was Up to Us, Claire's Neighbors, to Deal with Her Dementia
Byline: Angela J. Conrad (Conrad lives in Monett, Mo.) A little more than a year ago, my elderly neighbor--I'll call her Claire--began exhibiting all the classic symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. For the 20 years that we had been sharing property...
Does Nanny Know Best? Forget Eating Worms-Now Reality TV Wants to Help Troubled Families. but Not All Advice Is Good Advice
Byline: Peg Tyre Exasperated parents are turning to two reality-TV shows-- "Supernanny" (new on ABC) and "Nanny 911" (which will resume on Fox this spring)--in hopes of getting some pointers on how to rein in their out-of-control kids. But are these...
Does Your iPod Play Favorites? My First iPod Seemed to Have a Fondness for Steely Dan, While Other Artists Were Sent into Exile
Byline: Steven Levy Last spring it dawned on Apple CEO Steve Jobs that the heart of his hit iPod digital music player was the "shuffle." This feature allows users to mix up their entire song collections--thousands of tunes--and play them back in...
Drugs: They Hurt, They Hoard; Vioxx Is off the Market, but Some Still Swear by It
Byline: Vanessa Juarez When Merck & Co. voluntarily pulled the painkiller Vioxx off shelves last September because it was found to increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, many of the 20 million pain sufferers who have taken the drug since...
Free to Be Angry; Election Time: Americans 'Liberated' Iraq, but It's Hard to Find Anyone Who Is Grateful
Byline: Rod Nordland (With Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad) Iraqis often point out that Saddam Hussein talked about freedom and democracy almost as much as the Americans do. Back in his day, Iraqis were free to vote in one-party elections, and did...
Gaming the Ad
Byline: Sarah Sennott Threatened by declining TV ratings, advertisers are looking for new ways to capture your eye, from short films to increasingly aggressive product placement on TV shows. The newest wrinkle goes beyond trying to divert attention...
Gonzales: Did He Help Bush Keep His DUI Quiet?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Senate Democrats put off a vote on White House counsel Alberto Gonzales's nomination to be attorney general, complaining he had provided evasive answers to questions about torture and the mistreatment of prisoners. But Gonzales's...
High Hopes, Hard Facts; the World's A Stage: His Ideals Are Soaring, but Now Bush Must Live and Lead by His Own Code
Byline: Fareed Zakaria It was a speech written for the ages, and it will live in history as a powerful affirmation of American ideas and ideals. George W. Bush's second Inaugural Address was the culmination, in style and substance, of a position...
Hi! the Net Is Calling. the Technology to Send Voices over Data Lines Is Revolutionizing the Telephone Industry-And, for Now, the Leader Is Vonage
Byline: Rana Foroohar Like the technology he's pushing, Jeffrey Citron, the 34-year-old CEO of Internet phone company Vonage, has a tendency to shake things up. In the 1990s, armed with little more than a high-school diploma, he founded two businesses,...
Life after Vioxx; If You've Given Up Your Cox-2 Inhibitor, Take Heart. There Are Other Ways to Fight Pain and Inflammation
Byline: Anne Underwood Plenty of patients panicked last fall when Vioxx was pulled from the market and questions began swirling around the related drugs Celebrex and Bextra. Peg Cushman, 56, of Freeport, Maine, didn't need to fret. She had tried...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, David Gates, Ramin Setoodeh Q&A: Debra Messing Debra Messing, the klutzy Grace Adler of "Will & Grace," is about to hit the big screen in "The Wedding Date." She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. In "Wedding...
Now Playing: 'Anybody but Dean, Part 2'; While the GOP Danced, the Dems Once Again Found Themselves Looking for a Leader Who's Not from Vermont
Byline: Howard Fineman Within hours of George Bush's Inauguration, everyone was playing his assigned role. Republicans, happily united, were dancing the night away at glittering balls in downtown Washington. Democrats, meanwhile, divided into familiar...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, New York Post, Boston Globe, Associated Press, MSNBC, New York Daily News, Associated Press, Newsday, Associated Press, New York Post "The best hope for peace... is the...
Sex and Science; Harvard's Controversial President Struck a Nerve on Campuses around the Country When He Questioned Whether Women Have the Brains for Math and Physics
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz (With Julie Scelfo in New York, Mary Carmichael and William Lee Adams in Boston) When Amber Post started grad school in physics at Princeton, her goal was the same as her male colleagues': a tenure-track job at a major...
Technology: It's Music to Their Ears
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh The party started for Candy Williams of Phoenix, Ariz., when she brought home a karaoke machine last year. Now she and her husband croon songs together after dinner--and even yodel, on occasion. Family members come over to...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker If this year's Oscar roundtable with six of Hollywood's leading actors was going to come off, Sean Smith fretted, everyone had to show up on time. He worried most about Hilary Swank, Annette Bening and Kate Winslet, figuring...
The Guy of the Storm; the Brash, Brilliant Summers Put His Foot in It-Again. Is the Former Treasury Secretary a Blunt Leader, a Liability, or Both?
Byline: With William Lee Adams It reads like a case study ripped straight from the pages of the Harvard Business Review. A brash, highly intelligent executive with a reputation for outspokenness is appointed to lead a tradition-bound organization....
The New Math: 28 + 35 = 43; Bush, Who Knows the Pleasure of Taking a Torch to a Straw Man, Said: 'Some, I Know, Have Questioned the Global Appeal of Liberty.'
Byline: George Will President Bush has launched his second term by, in effect, revising the two most famous passages from 20th-century Inaugural addresses. In 1933, in the trough of the Depression that was to cause Washington to begin weaving a...
The Yin and Yang of Chips; How to Match Cold Flavors with Hot Weather, and Other China Tips from PepsiCo International's CEO
Byline: Michael Hastings Michael White is a veteran general in the cola wars. He has been going to China to sell Pepsi for more than a decade. In 2003, he became CEO of PepsiCo International, the group now responsible for 50 percent of the sales...
They Need A Miracle; Will a Future Pope Relax the Rules for Sainthood?
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward Giuseppe Frassinetti (died 1868), a holy priest and founder of a religious order, would be a saint today--like his sister, Paola--except for one thing: he lacks two miracles credited to his intercession. The Vatican's...
This Tax Break's Broken; the Jobs Creation Act Created an Enormous Loophole
Byline: Allan Sloan Congress's trying to control what corporate America does with its money is like asking a toddler to go one-on-one with Michael Jordan in his prime. It's no contest. Consider Congress's attempts to limit spending of a tax break...
Welcome to Girls' State; for Women Seeking Office, Washington Is the Hot Spot
***** CORRECTION: In "Welcome to Girls' State" (Jan. 31) we misspelled the first name of Washington's first female governor. She was Dixy Lee Ray, not Dixie. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Karen Breslau In 1992, Christine Gregoire,...