Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 3

A 'Culture of Health'; Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee Has Put His State on a Fitness Regimen. Can He Do the Same for America?
Byline: Jennifer Barrett In the Spring of 2003, Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee weighed more than 280 pounds. He'd just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes--and seen a close friend die of a heart attack at 69. So the Republican governor changed his...
A Healthy Toast; It's Not Just Wine That Protects the Heart. All Alcohol Has Cardiac Benefits-In Moderation
Byline: Anne Underwood (With Ben Whitford) There is nothing like the joy of finding out that something sinful is actually good for you, whether it's sex, chocolate or a glass of fine red wine--or, for that matter, beer, schnapps, whisky or a satisfying...
Avoiding Dementia: Fitness and Your Brain
Byline: Steven K. Feske, M.D. (Feske is a neurologist at Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women's Hospital. For more information about the heart-brain connection, go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK.) People who take care of themselves...
A Washington Sand Trap; A Golf Outing Trips Up a Widening Circle of Power Brokers
Byline: Michael Isikoff David Safavian wasn't expecting visitors. A relatively senior White House official--he oversaw federal contracts for the Office of Management and Budget--the 38-year-old Safavian had been working around the clock on Katrina...
Best Treatments: Managing Heart Failure
Byline: G. William Dec, M.D. (Dec is chief of the cardiology division at Massachusetts General Hospital and DeSanctis Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. For more information go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK.) One day stem cells may...
By the Tube, for the Tube; You're Not Qualified to Govern This Country If You Don't Understand the Uses of TV. Those in Public Life Should Be Required to Watch It
Byline: Anna Quindlen On the second day of judge John Roberts's confirmation hearings, CNN's Jeff Greenfield felt moved to ask a question. The guest was Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa, and Greenfield inquired why his fellows on the Judiciary Committee...
Capitalism vs. Democracy; We Often Assume They Go Hand in Hand, but Recent Elections in Japan and Germany Provide a Sobering Reminder That There Are Deep Conflicts
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The recent German and Japanese elections deserve more attention than they've got because they illustrate the uneasy relationship between capitalism and democracy. Capitalism thrives on change--it inspires new technologies,...
CIA: 'An Agency Version of the "Jerry Springer Show"'
Byline: Mark Hosenball Personal and political feuding at CIA headquarters is turning into a soap opera. Morale has declined for months as CIA chief Porter Goss has purged senior managers and critics have assailed the agency for fumbling intelligence...
Designing Heart-Healthy Communities; We've Had Enough of Good Advice. the Real Secret to Fitness Is to Live in an Environment That Encourages It
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley and Karen Springen Forecasting heart disease is becoming an ever-finer art, as researchers learn more about the risk factors. But here's a predictor you may not have heard about: street address. In a study published last...
Drug Treatments: Making the Right Choice
Byline: James L. Januzzi, M.D. (Januzzi is a cardiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. For more information go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK.) Thanks to an array of drugs developed over the last 30 years, most people today can control conditions...
eBay's Bet: The Skype's the Limit
Byline: Steven Levy When I talked to Meg Whitman last week, we used plain old telephones. But since both of us belong to the 54 million-member Skype community--a global society one joins simply by signing up to use that company's voice over Internet...
Food: Hey, Ma, Pass the Spatula
Byline: Anna Kuchment and Karen Springen (With Nicki Gostin) At 11, New Yorker Benjamin Deutsch is a pie-making expert. He especially loves the feel of the dough: mixing it, rolling it, tasting it and shaping it into a perfect crust. "He could make...
Food: The School of Julia
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz In the summer of 2002, Julie Powell's prospects seemed bleak. Despite a degree from Amherst and "seven years of three-quarters-finished novels in drawers," she was still a 29-year-old New York secretary with rapidly fading...
Hey, Doc, Minimize It; Heart Surgeons Are Offering Patients New Operations That Dramatically Reduce Wear and Tear on the Body
Byline: David Noonan Barry Goodman, 46, is a chiropractor, yoga teacher, surfer, kayaker, swimmer, cyclist and father of four who has worked hard throughout his life to stay fit and healthy. Unfortunately, he is also part of a family with a significant...
Iraq: 82nd Faces Allegations
Byline: Michael Hirsh and John Barry The Bush Administration has long insisted any abuse of prisoners in Iraq or Afghanistan violated official U.S. policy--that it was committed by those on the Abu Ghraib night shift. But a new report by Human Rights...
Keeping Her Promise to Our Kids
***** CORRECTION: "Keeping Her Promise To Our Kids" (Periscope, Oct. 3) erroneously stated that 60 percent of the children in Tempe, Ariz., live below the poverty line. We should have said that about 60 percent of the children in Tempe's elementary-school...
Love Is Real Medicine; Loneliness Fosters Cardiovascular Disease. Fortunately, There's an Antidote
Byline: Dean Ornish, M.D. (Ornish, a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, is founder and president of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute. His books include "Love and Survival" and "Dr. Dean Ornish's...
Newsmakers
Byline: Jac Chebatoris, Susannah Meadows Q&A: GRETCHEN WILSON Self-proclaimed "Redneck Woman" Gretchen Wilson went from filing for bankruptcy to selling more than 4 million records with her anthem for the common gal. A few days before the...
North Korea Hold 'Em; Washington Used to Have Most of the Chips in Six-Party Talks over Pyongyang's Nuclear Program. but Beijing Is the Key Player Now-For Better and Worse
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Melinda Liu (With Sarah Schafer in Beijing and B. J. Lee in Seoul) High-stakes diplomacy is not unlike "Celebrity Poker." In both there is a big stage, a rapt audience and swift reversals of fortune. And in diplomacy as...
Out of the Rubble. Condos and Slots? We Will Never Re-Create the Biloxi I Loved as a Child, but We Must Try to Build Something Just as Unique
Byline: Annalyn Swan (Swan, a former NEWSWEEK editor, lives in New York.) I walk toward the beach, past the centuries-old oak that has overhung my family's cemetery lot for generations. Half is still standing--the other half, broken away. Ahead...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: Bloomberg, AP, New York Times, AP, The Washington Post (2), Children's Hospital Boston, The Washington Post, AP "Houston is weathering the storm." Houston Mayor Bill White, on a weakened Hurricane Rita's causing extensive...
Rebuilding the Heart; Stem Cells Seem to Rejuvenate Failing Hearts. the Trouble Is, Doctors Still Don't Understand How
Byline: Mary Carmichael A million lonely ballads notwithstanding, with time, the human heart can recover from an emotional wound. In medicine, however, the prognosis is often bleaker, and time only makes a physical injury worse. If starved for oxygen,...
Rita's Lessons; First, a Slow-Footed Response. Then: Hyperactivity. Back-to-Back Storms Test Bush's Ability to Lead in a Crisis
***** CORRECTION: In "Double Trouble On Refinery Row," the graphic accompanying "Rita's Lessons" (Oct. 3), the designation and boundaries of the state of Alabama were inadvertently omitted. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Evan Thomas...
Saudi Storms; as Hurricanes Batter the American Coast and Send Oil Prices Up, Al Qaeda Is Watching, and Drawing Lessons
Byline: Christopher Dickey The shoot-out earlier this month around a seafront villa in the Saudi Arabian city of Ad Dammam lasted almost 48 hours, and ended only when security forces brought in light artillery. They blasted the opulent home until...
Searching for Hidden Heart Risks; New Technologies Offer Incredible Images, but More Traditional Tests Are Probably All You Need
Byline: Peter Libby, M.D., and Patrick J. Skerrett (Libby is chief of cardiovascular medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Mallinckrodt Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Skerrett is editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. For more...
Slow-Motion Makeover; John Mack Has Boosted Morale at Morgan. Now Comes the Hard Part: Ending the Politics, and Lifting the Stock
Byline: Charles Gasparino Shortly after John Mack took over as chief executive of Morgan Stanley nearly three months ago, he held a town-hall meeting with the company's brokerage division. The audience had reason to worry. After all, the brokerage...
Staying Safe: How to Quit Smoking
Byline: Nancy Rigotti, M.D. (Rigotti, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, directs the Tobacco Research and Treatment Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. For more information on smoking cessation, go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK.)...
'Terrorist Administration'; Chavez Attacks Bush, and Warns about Oil Prices
Byline: Lally Weymouth Venezuela's president Hugo Chavez is a bete noire of the Bush administration. He's a populist on the Castro model who wants to steer Latin America firmly to the left. He also rules a key oil-producing country, which gives...
The Battle to Rebuild; in a Fierce Cultural Storm, the Future of the Lower Ninth Is Buffeted by Race and Politics
Byline: Evan Thomas and Arian Campo-Flores (With Sarah Childress, T. Trent Gegax and Daren Briscoe Graphic by Andrew Romano and Kevin Hand) The Lower Ninth was going under, again. Floodwaters from Hurricane Rita had breached the levee along the...
The Dangers of Chronic Distress; Are You Worried, Irritable and Socially Inhibited? A Simple Test May Help Predict the Health Effects
Byline: Michael Craig Miller, M.D. (Miller is editor in chief of the Harvard Mental Health Letter. For more information go to health.harvard.edu/NEWSWEEK.) Years ago, when the psychologist Johan Denollet was first working with cardiac patients at...
The Dispossessed: 'This Is like a Prison'; Katrina Drove Them from New Orleans. Rita Made Them Move Again. Life on the Road for a Frustrated Group of Evacuees
Byline: Jennifer Ordonez It's a journey without a destination. Almost a month ago, Glenda Smith, 42, was flooded out of her home in New Orleans. Along with seven family members, including two infants under the age of 6 months, she spent two nights...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker I teared up," says our usually dry-eyed medical correspondent, Claudia Kalb. "I couldn't help it." She had gone to Children's Hospital Boston to report on the amazing new world of fetal heart surgery. Touring the ICU, she...
The Good Heart; Diet and Exercise Are Not the Whole Secret to Cardiovascular Health. Mounting Evidence Suggests That Your Psychological Outlook Is Just as Important
Byline: Anne Underwood (Graphics by Josh Ulick) You can call it the Northridge Effect, after the powerful earthquake that struck near Los Angeles at 4:30 on a January morning in 1994. Within an hour, and for the rest of the day, medics responding...
The Smallest Patients; to Help Babies with Heart Defects, Doctors Can Now Operate in the Womb
Byline: Claudia Kalb Melissa Paske was 29 weeks pregnant with a girl when she asked her doctor for a second ultrasound. Her belly had been scanned at 24 weeks, and there was no medical reason to take additional images. But, says Paske, "something...
When Should You Start to Worry? A Harvard Heart Doctor Addresses Your Concerns
Byline: Dr. Thomas H. Lee (Lee, an internist and cardiologist, is network president of Partners HealthCare System and CEO of Partners Community Healthcare, which was founded by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. He is...