Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 4

AFLAC Ducks a Punch over Executive Pay
Byline: Allan Sloan When the public face of your company is a duck, you can't afford to foul up your reputation. (Yes, you can groan now.) Take Aflac Insurance, best known for its ubiquitous quacking commercials. Something funny happened at the...
A Holy City Loses Faith; Forty Years Later, the Myth of Jerusalem Is Splintering
Byline: Kevin Peraino (With Joanna Chen and Nuha Musleh in Jerusalem) Moshe Amirav was dreaming about Jerusalem on the morning that he ended up with a bullet in his head. It was June 7, 1967, the climactic offensive of the Six Day War, and Israeli...
BeliefWatch: Edutainment
Byline: Lisa Miller This summer, tourists who want attractions with a Christian flavor have at least two new options to choose from. The first, opening to the public June 5, is the Billy Graham Library, situated on 63 acres in Charlotte, N. C. For...
Betas Rule; What Do Jim from 'The Office,' Shrek and Al Gore Have in Common? They're Beta Males-Losers Who Are Winning. Look out, Alpha Dogs
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Ben stone isn't what you'd call a player. He lives with four buddies in a squalid slacker palace. He's chubby, furry and happily unemployed, unless you count a scheme to launch a Web site charting every female nude scene in...
Birth of an Insemination; and Baby Makes Glee in the Charming Comedy 'Knocked Up.'
Byline: David Ansen What "the 40-year-Old Virgin" suggested, "Knocked Up" confirms. Judd Apatow is making the freshest, most honest mainstream comedies in Hollywood. The writer-director has managed to synthesize the neurotic, outsider comedy of...
Bush's Monica Problem; Gonzales, the President's Lawyer and Texas Buddy, Is Twisting Slowly in the Wind, Facing a Vote of No Confidence from the Senate
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Evan Thomas The United States Department of Justice has not always been above politics. John F. Kennedy, after all, appointed his brother and consigliere Robert to be attorney general. But the Justice Department is supposed...
Gathering the Tribes; U.S. Field Commanders Are Finally Beginning to Tap the Traditional Networks That Helped Saddam to Stay in Power
Byline: Melinda Liu (With Larry Kaplow and Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad and John Barry in Washington) Pungent smoke floats through the chandeliers of the tribal chief's reception room. At his home in Ramadi, capital of Anbar province and a onetime...
Get out Your Handkerchiefs
Byline: Sharon Begley When Lewis Ziska wanted to see how a warmer world with more carbon dioxide in the air would affect certain plants, he didn't set up his experiment in a greenhouse or boot up a computer model. He headed for Baltimore. Cities...
How to Increase Paranoia
Byline: Kevin Peraino Israelis have always been something of a reluctant authority on the subject of posttraumatic stress. Experts estimate that 15 percent of the Jewish state's combat wounded--more than 3,000 vets--suffer from some form of the...
In Search of a Political Savior; Evangelicals Aren't Flocking to the GOP Front Runners, and Don't Know Where to Turn
Byline: Eve Conant (With Jonathan Darman) They'd come to pay their respects to the past, but the talk soon turned to the future. The country's leading conservative Christians convened in Lynchburg, Va., last week to bury the Rev. Jerry Falwell,...
Newsmakers
Q&A: Natalie Portman The actress has four movies out later this year--and she's going to Uganda for FINCA, a nonprofit that provides loans to low-income entrepreneurs in other countries. She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Why are we talking during...
Out of What 'Shadows'?
Byline: George F. Will Who knew? The nation's fastest-growing metropolitan area is in Southern Utah. The continuing growth of this area is, however, contingent on something that is contingent on Congress. This region around the town of St. George...
Perspectives: Quotes in the News
"There were times I crossed the line." Monica Goodling, a former Justice Department aide, testifying before Congress that she inappropriately made political beliefs a factor in hiring "There has been no water and electricity since Sunday, and...
Reading the Book of Jim; the Co-Discoverer of the Double Helix Is Making His DNA Public, Pioneering the 'Personal Genome.'
Byline: Sharon Begley It would be a mistake to think that reaching the age of 79 has mellowed James Watson. Fifty-four years after he discovered, with Francis Crick, the structure of DNA, and 45 years after sharing the Nobel Prize for it, he delights...
Rivers of Doubt; Minute Quantities of Everyday Contaminants in Our Drinking Supply Could Add Up to Big Trouble
Byline: Anne Underwood U.S.A. Population: 300 million Problem: Emerging contaminants Up to his knees: Schoenfuss captures fish for study in the Grindstone River near Hinckley, Minn., looking for chemicals that mimic hormones The common...
Running Hard by Staying Out
Byline: Howard Fineman If you want to send a message in Washington, issue a press release--or go to the Palm. It's a restaurant where the jocular masks the manipulative: a stock exchange of politics, with bigger portions. It was perfect for Michael...
Scheduling Adulthood One Page at a Time; I Thought Getting a Day Planner Would Mean My Carefree Youth Was over. Now I Just Miss Less of It
Byline: Kate Torgovnick (Torgovnick lives in New York, N.Y.) My first day planner was a college-graduation present from a well-intentioned relative. I'd untied the ribbon on the small box hoping for an iPod, so I was puzzled when I saw a black book...
Sweet-And Steady
Byline: Jon Meacham Ronald Reagan's fans and foes disagree about almost everything, except this: they both tend to depict the 40th president as something of a one-dimensional figure. To those who love him, the Gipper is the hero who rescued America...
Tehran's Secret 'Department 9000'
Byline: Mark Hosenball President Bush said last week he expects a "bloody" summer in Iraq. What he didn't say is that a growing covert war between the United States and Iran may be one reason the conflict is escalating. U.S. intelligence has identified...
The Changing Science of Pain; Millions of Aging Boomers and the Latest Generation of Wounded Soldiers Hope the Secrets of Our Most Enduring Medical Foe Can Finally Be Unlocked
***** CORRECTION: Clarification: Our story, "The Changing Science of Pain" referred to "a new form of the morphine derivative called Kadian." The new drug, called ALO-01, contains the same active indredient as Kadian but delivers the morphine...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Long ago, Mary Carmichael, the author of both this week's cover story on pain and a long piece on the global water crisis, wanted to be a doctor. Medicine's loss was journalism's gain, but at a price: some sea urchins had to...
Troubled Waters; Drought, Pollution, Mismanagement and Politics Have Made Water a Precious Commodity in Much of the World
Byline: Mary Carmichael (With Sarah Schafer in Beijing and Sudip Mazumdar in New Delhi) Daily life in the developed world has depended so much, for so long, on clean water that it is sometimes easy to forget how precious a commodity water is. The...
Truth and Doo-Wop; Can't Tell a Fake from the Original? How One Man's Campaign against Musical Impostors Might Help
Byline: Jerry Adler Let us consider two great experiences of Western culture. One is viewing "Girl With a Pearl Earring," by the 17th-century Dutch master Johannes Vermeer, which hangs in a museum in The Hague. The other is a performance of "Up...
When Baby Comes Back
Byline: Linda Stern Doug Fox is your basic boomerang kid. One year after graduating from Franklin & Marshall College, he's comfortably ensconced in what used to be the private nanny wing of his parents' Falls Church, Va., home. They charge no...