Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 11

A Long Strange TB Trip; an Atlanta Lawyer with a Potentially Deadly Contagious Disease Talks about a Journey That Has Triggered Fear and Outrage
Byline: Eve Conant and Pat Wingert (With Joe Contreras) It wasn't much of a honeymoon, but Andrew Speaker has mostly himself to blame for that. The 31-year-old personal-injury lawyer from Atlanta wants the world to know he's really sorry for eluding...
A Mother's Darkest Day; A Caring Mom, Berta Estrada Was Depressed. She Hanged Her Four Kids before Killing Herself
Byline: Gretel C. Kovach Alejandra Estrada probably expected to find her sister Berta asleep. It was 6:30 a.m. last Tuesday, and, after Berta failed to show for her shift at Wendy's, Alejandra, also a Wendy's employee, stopped by her sister's trailer...
A Tale of Two Dynasties; the Bancrofts Are the Most Important Family You've Never Heard of. with the Murdochs in the Hunt for Dow Jones, a Media Saga Takes a New Turn
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts William Cox Jr.'s heart began to fail him early this spring as he was waiting for a flight at JFK International Airport. At 76, Cox is a respected member of the Bancroft family, which controls Dow Jones & Co., publisher...
BeliefWatch: Buddhists
Byline: Lisa Miller The Beliefnet.com post is typical teenage angst, but with a twist. Mother is a zealous new convert to Roman Catholicism. Father is along for the ride. "Silentmist" wants an answer to this question: "How should I go about telling...
Beyond Bush; What the World Needs Is an Open, Confident America
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In the fall of 1982, I arrived in the United States as an 18-year-old student from India. The country was in rough shape. That December unemployment hit 10.8 percent, higher than at any point since World War II. Interest rates...
Bodies Wanted; Maggots, Raccoons, Squirrels and Bugs. A Unique Southern Study of Decomposing Bodies Has Inspired Other 'Body Farms' to Sprout across the Country
Byline: Raina Kelley Springtime in east Tennessee is a beautiful thing. Sunlight dapples through lush oak and maple trees. A warm breeze sends the invigorating scent of juniper through the air. Then the wind shifts, and suddenly the atmosphere is...
Bringing Racing into Prime Time; How Signing NASCAR's First Nationwide TV Deal Helped Grow the Sport
Byline: Brian France (France, 44, is chairman and CEO of NASCAR.) Today 75 million Americans call themselves NASCAR fans, but I was fortunate to grow up in the sport. My grandfather William H.G. (Big Bill) France organized NASCAR in 1948, and my...
Driving to the Funeral; If Someone Told You That There Was One Behavior Most Likely to Lead to the Premature Death of Your Kid, Wouldn't You Do Something about That?
Byline: Anna Quindlen The four years of high school grind inexorably to a close, the milestones passed. The sports contests, the SATs, the exams, the elections, the dances, the proms. And too often, the funerals. It's become a sad rite of passage...
Gates and the Press
Byline: John Barry Defense secretary Robert Gates has a message for the military: keep focused on the real enemies. "Today, I want to encourage you always to remember the importance of two pillars of our freedom under the Constitution--the Congress...
Going Green at Work
Byline: Anna Kuchment (With Christina Gillham) Allison Friedman, 34, was running her own restaurant in Brookline, Mass., when she had an epiphany. "For five years, it was enough for me to work hard, make a living and have a good time," she says....
I'm Still Listening for My Father's Words; Alzheimer's Stole My Dad's Vocabulary. but He Never Needed Language to Show Me That He Cared
Byline: Patricia Traxler (Traxler lives in Salina, Kans.) Aphasia is an oddly beautiful word, like the name of a flower. I imagine it blue, with slender petals and delicate filaments, breaking through hard winter soil, because each word my father...
Indecent Exposure? New Laws Seek to Protect Breast-Feeding in Public
Byline: Karen Springen A few weeks ago, the ac-tress Maggie Gyllenhaal visiteda public park in New York --and breast-fed her 8-month-old daughter, Ramona. Kudos, right? After all, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that moms nurse for...
It's Called 'Sexsomnia'; People with This Rare Disorder Engage in Sexual Activity While Asleep, but Don't Remember It Later
Byline: Anne Underwood When Jan Luedecke of Toronto was arrested and tried for sexual assault, he had an unusual defense--he did it in his sleep. Really. It may sound farfetched, but Luedecke, who was 33 at his 2005 trial, had a history of sleepwalking....
It's Not All about Money; the Wall Street Journal Doesn't Make the Profits It Used to. but Its Prestigious, Well-Known Name Is a Valuable Asset
Byline: Allan Sloan If all you care about is reported profits, you wouldn't want any part of owning The Wall Street Journal. The paper, for all its cachet and influence, is at best marginally profitable; the profits of its parent, Dow Jones, come...
It's Not TV-It's HB Uh-Oh; Its CEO and Its Mafia Don Are Sleeping with the Fishes. Its Cable Rivals Are Smelling Blood. but Is HBO Rebuilding-Or Reloading?
Byline: Devin Gordon To help remodel the house that Tony Soprano built, HBO will unveil five original series over the next year, including a show about a combustible family of California surfers, a broad satire of filthy-rich Friends of Dubya set...
Mail Call: Is Bill an Asset or Liability for Hillary?
Readers had decidedly mixed reactions to the prospect of an ex-president's spouse running for the White House, the subject of our May 28 cover story. One Clintons fan, who looked forward to a Hillary presidency, wrote, "I believe our Bill will be a...
Mop-Top Napoleon; Phil Spector's Genius Was Limitless. So Was His Ego
Byline: Brian Braiker Seeing phil spector on trial for the murder of a 40-year-old B-movie actress, you can't help but wonder how the knob-twiddling genius behind the biggest singles of the 1960s ended up here--and in a yellow wig to boot. "Tearing...
Murder in 12 Steps; in 'Mr. Brooks,' Kevin Costner Is Addicted to Killing
Byline: David Ansen If you've seen the trailer for the Kevin-Costner-is-a-killer movie "Mr. Brooks," you might fear that the entire plot has been given away. The good news: there are many twists, turns, subplots and surprises that the coming attractions...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin Q&A: Chloe Sevigny Sevigny plays Nicky, the spoiled second wife in HBO's polygamy drama "Big Love," which returns next week. She spoke with Nicki Gostin. I love your character on "Big Love" because she's sort of a...
Notes from Underground; as Museum Architects Take a Shine to Less Bling, There's No Place to Go but Down
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is as beloved in Kansas City, Mo., as slow-smoked barbecue. With its orderly rows of columns, it sits majestically at the crest of a hill, surrounded by a verdant 20-acre sculpture park....
Obama's Voice Problem; with No Shortage of People Offering Advice, Obama Is Trying to Stay True to Himself
Byline: Richard Wolffe (With Daniel Klaidman and Jonathan Darman) It was a low-key event for the rock star of American politics: a poorly lit seminar room at a community college in Mason City, Iowa, full of voters sharing their woes about the health-care...
Perspectives: Quotes in the News
"In hindsight, maybe it wasn't the best decision." Andrew Speaker, 31, of Atlanta, on his choice to board an international flight despite being diagnosed with a drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis "It's nothing less than embarrassing that...
Slam Dancing for Allah; Muslim Punk Rock-It's Not as Bizarre as It Sounds
Byline: Matthew Philips It's near midnight in a small Fairfax, Va., bar, and Omar Waqar stands on a makeshift stage, brooding in a black tunic and brown cap. He stops playing his electric guitar long enough to survey the crowd--an odd mix of local...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham A quarter century ago, Fareed Zakaria left his native India for America. He was 18, a student, and now, looking back, he remembers the optimism of the country he came to--an optimism that stands in contrast to what he believes...
The End of Fake IDs?
Byline: Samantha Henig John M. McCardell Jr.'s latest mission may have a greater effect on college freshmen than anything he did during his 13 years as president of Middlebury College: he wants to lower the drinking age to 18--but not in order to...
The Lady and the Veep; Condoleezza Rice Has Steered the Administration Back toward Diplomacy, but She's Still Being Harried by Hard-Liners
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Mark Hosenball Condoleezza rice seems in control of everything--except events. As she paused for a few minutes in the cabin of her Boeing 757 last week, winging her way to her 63rd country in two and a half years (Spain...
The Quagmire of Inequality; Citing Income Increases of the Most Wealthy Evokes Images of Greedy CEOs and Hedge-Fund Managers. but the Story Is More Complicated
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson You have never heard of the treaty of Detroit, which you may connect with the French and Indian War (1756-1763). Guess again. The Treaty of Detroit is a long-lost label describing a series of landmark labor agreements...
The Supremes' Technical Failure
Byline: Ellis Cose In the end, Lilly Ledbetter was just too late. her complaint was "untimely." So declared Samuel Alito in a 5-4 decision explaining why the Supreme Court was rejecting her discrimination claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights...
'The Times Are Different'; with 19 Months Left in Her Term as Secretary of State, Rice Has No Major Deal to Her Credit. What Can She Accomplish Now?
Byline: Michael Hirsh Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice sat down for an interview with NEWSWEEK's Michael Hirsh while en route from Berlin to Madrid on a European tour last week. Asked about her likely legacy, she was notably low-key in expressing...
The Unsilent Treatment
Byline: Howard Fineman Knowing Newt Gingrich, I was a little alarmed when his secretary told me where he was. "He's in Hawaii, doing Pearl Harbor," she said. I envisioned him in Snoopy goggles and scarf, strafing the islands in a biplane, shouting...
Thompson and the 'Laziness' Issue
Byline: Holly Bailey Does Fred Thomp- son have what it takes to be president? The former senator turned "Law & Order" actor, who launched an exploratory committee last week, has been dogged by rumors that he doesn't have the work ethic for a...
'Truth Is, I'm the Same Guy I Always Was'; 'You Can't Replace Someone like John, and I Don't Think He Could Have Replaced Someone like Me.'
Byline: Andrew Romano (Daniel Klaidman) Paul McCartney hasn't slowed down. in the midst of a messy divorce, the 40th anniversary of "Sgt. Pepper" and preparations for his 65th birthday, McCartney is releasing his 22nd post-Beatles studio disc, "Memory...
Unwanted Attention; Arab Bloggers Face Government Clampdowns
Byline: Dan Ephron In the two years since he start-ed writing political commentary on his Web site, Syrian blogger Ammar Abdulhamid has called President Bashar Assad a thug, a dictator, Mr. Bean, the village idiot and Fredo Corleone--the bumbling...
When Bloggers Say No to a Simple Chat
Byline: Steven Levy When Wired magazine writer Fred Vogelstein set out to write a story about a Silicon Valley blogger, Mike Arrington, he figured he would do what virtually every professional journalist does--interview key people, either face to...
When Harry Met Tony; 'The Sopranos' and 'Harry Potter' Fade to Black within Weeks of Each Other. Turns out That's One of Many Parallels between the Mob Boss and the Boy Wizard
Byline: Malcolm Jones It is, in a way, a sort of split-level love affair. For the past decade, children have been staying up late to finish the latest installments concerning the fortunes of Harry Potter. Meanwhile, downstairs in the TV room, Mom...