Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 12, September 17

A Chip That's Worth A Wait
Byline: Steven Levy Its flagship product was delayed, and its fight with Intel continues. But for AMD's leader, it's all good. Until recently, Hector Ruiz's tenure as CEO of Advanced Micro Devices was a Cinderella tale. As a student struggling...
A Dog Who Was Pure Muscle and All Heart
Byline: Ben Rehder; Rehder Lives In Dripping Springs, Texas. Pit bulls get a bad name, but Esmerelda's only 'killer instinct' was to overwhelm us with affection. Some people love poodles. Others go crazy for cocker spaniels. When it comes to...
American Forgetting
Byline: Anna Quindlen Instead of expanding, we contracted. Instead of a new juncture, we retreated to old ways. It's all there at the construction site. At the construction project that has replaced the site of one of America's greatest national...
'A Much Fuller Understanding'
Byline: Jonathan Darman In an interview with NEWSWEEK, the front runner talks about what she knows now that she didn't know then. Of all the current candidates for president -- or, for that matter, just about anyone who's ever made the race --...
A New Tape Leads to New Fears
Byline: Mark Hosenball And Michael Isikoff Terror Judging from a new message released last week, Osama bin Laden is still alive and plotting. The latest video -- the first since October 2004 -- shows bin Laden looking unnaturally youthful in...
A Texas Tycoon's Final Showdown
Byline: Suzanne Smalley, Mark Hosenball and Gretel C. Kovach The Feds say Oscar Wyatt Jr. was paying off Saddam. The oilman insists he was just trying to stop a war. Oscar Wyatt Jr. has been called a lot of things in his stormy, storied career....
Beethoven Goes Digital
Byline: Alexandra A. Seno Classical music is making money again, thanks largely to online downloads. It's a great example of how the 'long tail' theory is changing an industry. Classical music hardly seems like a growth business. We're forever...
BeliefWatch: Namaste
Byline: Lisa Miller Beliefwatch: Namaste A decade ago, book publishers discovered a fertile market in the growing number of liberal-minded Jews interested in Buddhist meditation -- the publishers called them "JewBus." Rodger Kamenetz started...
Brainiac Brigade
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh and John Barry; With Dan Ephron In Washington Some of the military's finest minds helped craft the strategy that has produced some signs of good news out of Iraq. But even they don't know if it will work. Dripping...
Can God Love Darwin, Too?
Byline: Sharon Begley There may be some battlefields where the gospel's "blessed are the peacemakers" holds true. But despite the work of a growing number of scholars and millions of dollars in foundation funding to find harmony between science...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Linda Stern September can be a painful time for small-business owners: their quarterly estimated taxes are due on the 17th. Next year could hurt even worse. The Internal Revenue Service will scrutinize more small-business returns to try...
Care from Afar
Byline: Linda Stern Small hospitals use technology to run remote ICUs. For patients, being awakened before dawn to be examined by doctors on rounds is one of the many unpleasant aspects of life in a hospital. But at three Swedish Medical Center...
Come Back, Mr. Chips
Byline: Julie Scelfo Stereotyping, low pay, lack of role models. Why the number of men teaching in schools is at a 40-year low. When numerous fellow teachers asked Josh Holt to mentor their students last year at Heber Hunt Elementary in Sedalia,...
Excuse Me, Mr. Ford
Byline: Keith Naughton How to tell the man whose name is on the building that you're overhauling the family firm he once ran As Ford Motor Co.'s sales continued to drop this summer, the company's new CEO, Alan Mulally, made a visit to the wood-paneled...
Getting to Know You
Byline: Andrew Romano Can a gag man turn senator? That's what Al Franken is trying to do in Minnesota -- and it's tricky work. Al Franken isn't used to holding his tongue. Knowing that, one might expect the froggy, horn-rimmed comedian to punctuate...
Homeroom Zombies
Byline: Lawrence Epstein, M.D., And Steven Mardon Teens need at least nine hours of sleep a night, though few get that much and early school start times don't help. Here's what parents can do. As the school year kicks off, parents are once again...
How Apple's iPhone Ate the New iPods
Byline: Steven Levy Fall means football, back to school, presidential politics -- and new iPods. Once again Apple CEO Steve Jobs gets a chance to trounce his hapless competitors in the digital-media area by unveiling better stuff at lower prices,...
How She Would Govern
Hillary Clinton has been in politics long enough to know the value of the word "change." In 1992, her husband's political guru, James Carville, hung a white sign in the Clinton campaign war room that read CHANGE VS. MORE OF THE SAME. Bill Clinton won...
In Search of a GOP St. George
Byline: Howard Fineman Iowa Republicans will tell you that the Devil does not wear Prada; she wears a pantsuit, low-heeled shoes and a sunny, I-told-you-so smile. Karl Rove insists that Sen. Hillary Clinton is a "fatally flawed candidate," and many...
Luciano Pavarotti, 1935-2007
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Luciano Pavarotti was one of the biggest opera stars of the last century, but he was much bigger than opera. A lyric tenor whose remarkable voice was so honeyed and brilliant that even non-opera lovers were readily moved...
Our Giveaway Farm Programs
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Since 1970, farm subsidies have cost us almost $600 billion. Not much. But they survive because of politics. The farm legislation now proceeding through Congress symbolizes much of what's wrong with Washington. It's...
Prayer in Pyongyang
Byline: Christian Caryl and B. J. Lee Activists cast a light on the underground church. Few people can say they have it good in North Korea, but at one point Son Jong Nam could. He was the son of a high-ranking officer in the all-powerful military....
Quotes in the News
"They're trying to use the media as a way to terrorize us." Frances Townsend, Homeland Security adviser, on a new video message from Osama bin Laden, marking the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks "The most likely scenario, by far, is that by October...
Raising Healthy Kids
A Harvard pediatrician replies to parents worried about day care, autism and vaccines. COLUMBIA, S.C.: I recently put my kids in day care and they have had constant cold symptoms and mild diarrhea. I realize day care is an adjustment and exposes...
Save Energy -- and Money
Byline: Karen Springen By now, most consumers know the basics of saving energy at home: install fluorescent light bulbs, buy appliances with the Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star label and seal air leaks around doors, windows and pipes...
Sharif Returns from Exile
Byline: Ron Moreau In 1999, during his scandal-plagued second term as prime minister of Pakistan, Nawaz Sharif tried to sack his Army chief, Gen. Pervez Musharraf. Instead, Musharraf had Sharif arrested, allowing him to leave the country only on...
Starting the Good Life in the Womb
Pregnant women who eat right, watch their weight and stay active can actually improve their unborn babies' chances of growing into healthy adults. Most pregnant women know they can hurt their babies by smoking, drinking alcohol and taking drugs...
The Cultural War on Diabetes
Byline: Andrew Murr There's an epidemic underway in this country, and minority communities are being hit hard. How two Los Angeles doctors are finding new ways to help. The teenager had the kind of story Drs. Francine Kaufman and Anne Peters...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham The interview had just begun when Hillary Clinton got to the heart of the matter. For our cover on how a new President Clinton might govern, Jonathan Darman asked her: "As someone who's watched a president up close, what do you...
The Emmy Entourage
Byline: Devin Gordon and Marc Peyser Maybe this is silly, but we've always found it charming when famous people get nervous around other famous people. When two-time Oscar winner Sally Field arrived for our first-ever Emmy Roundtable, America Ferrera,...
The Role of A Lifetime
Byline: Michael Douglas In his 60s, the star has discovered that his basic instinct is to be a good husband and father -- and to make pancakes. It's hard to balance work and family. I work in an industry that has a relatively short window of...
The Talent Primary
Byline: Michael Hirsh Obama's campaign is peeling off former advisers to Bill Clinton, and Hillary's folks are none too happy. They were devotees of the cult of Clinton. Greg Craig was Bill Clinton's lawyer, defending him on TV against impeachment...
The Tao of Junk
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Eleazar David Melendez Pundits bemoan our trade deficit with China. But those container ships aren't heading home empty. Here's what's inside. Economists make a big deal out of all the junk we import from China -- tainted...
Trading Places
Byline: Richard M. Smith John Thain left Goldman Sachs for the New York Stock Exchange -- and a new life in the public eye. When Goldman Sachs President John Thain became CEO of the New York Stock Exchange in 2004, the organization was still...
Uncle Sam's New Welcome
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores For Rodolfo Acevedo, the complicated process of becoming a U.S. citizen wasn't pleasant. The various south Florida offices of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services that he visited were "not very friendly -- and not...
Waiter, Please Hold the Wheat
Byline: Anne Underwood Symptoms can be baffling at first. But once doctors diagnose celiac disease, patients can take advantage of a growing array of healthy foods. In 1988, Alice Bast came home from a vacation in Cancun with what seemed like...
When the Spotlight Fades
Byline: Evan Thomas Two new books ask, What's an ex-president to do but worry about his place in history? A year ago, when President George W. Bush was in New York to give his annual address to the United Nations, he ran into former president...
You and Your Quirky Kid
Byline: Lorraine Ali The girl who wears her clothes inside out, the boy who loves plumbing. What parents and experts say about the children who just don't fit in. At a recent pre-school musical, my son was to stand single file onstage with 13...