Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 8, February 25

America the Over-Stored
Byline: Daniel Gross This decade's building frenzy produced a bumper crop of new retail space. But the occupants haven't materialized. The carnage in retail hasn't been this bad since an anarchist bombed Chicago's Haymarket Square in 1886. In...
A Perennial Press Opera
Byline: Evan Thomas; With Jonathan Darman, Martha Brant, Arian Campo-Flores, Karen Breslau, Daniel Stone And Andrew Romano Be serious! Give us access! The roots of the Clinton-media tension. If Hillary Clinton loses the Democratic nomination...
A Real Wife, in A Real Marriage
Byline: Raina Kelley An outspoken, smart black woman or a bossy, emasculating wife? Michelle Obama defies stereotypes, but cannot escape them, either. In my junior year of high school, I ran for Student Council president. In my 17-year-old mind,...
Barack's Rock
Byline: Richard Wolffe; With Sarah Kliff, Karen Springen And Roxana Popescu She's the one who keeps him real, the one who makes sure running for leader of the free world doesn't go to his head. Michelle's story. Michelle Obama was never much...
Beanball on Capitol Hill
Byline: Mark Hosenball It began as a juiced-up soap opera about steroids in baseball, but the congressional inquiry into whether legendary pitcher Roger Clemens used performance-enhancing drugs has morphed into a bizarre partisan slugfest between...
Campus Sexperts
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Erotic magazines run by students at elite colleges have prospered. So why are they having less sex? As the writer of a blog called Sex and the Ivy, Harvard student Lena Chen promotes herself as something of an authority...
'Everything I Cook Is Good'
Byline: Jessica Bennett Best-known for his 1995 hit "Gangsta's Paradise," Compton, Calif.-born rapper Coolio, now 44, is trying to move beyond the microphone. He's the star of a new weekly Webisode series on mydamnchannel.com called "Cookin' With...
Evolution Is a Slow Process
Byline: N'Gai Croal The evolutionary game Spore arrives in September, two years later than planned. What took so long? When I first saw Will Wright's Spore at his offices just outside of San Francisco, this videogame addict felt as if he'd glimpsed...
Get Your Sperm Moving
Byline: Karen Springen Like many couples, Brian Delaney, 35, and his wife, Daniela, 34, turned to in vitro fertilization after failing to conceive on their own. But after five attempts and an investment of $150,000, IVF failed them as well. Then...
How Deep in the Hearts of Texas?
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Clinton's chances may come down to Latino support in the Lone Star State. This was one fired-up crowd. At a rally for Sen. Hillary Clinton at St. Mary's University in San Antonio last Wednesday, thousands of people...
How McGovern Made This
Byline: George F. Will He thinks he could have won in 1972 with a running mate called 'the most trusted man in America'--Walter Cronkite. The former bomber pilot's spry walk belies his 85 years, he dresses like a boulevardier--gray slacks, blue...
'I Can Only Be Who I Can Be'
Byline: Richard Wolffe Michelle on the 'pluses and minuses' of her potential role as First Lady En route to Sheboygan, Wis., last week for a round-table discussion about balancing work and family, Michelle Obama talked with NEWSWEEK's Richard...
In Defense of Secularism
Byline: Lisa Miller 'It's red meat for pundits,' concedes Harvard chaplain Greg Epstein, who prefers the word 'humanist.' In the public school I went to in the 1970s, "secular" was A neutral, descriptive word. Our social-studies teacher taught...
I Thought, 'This Can't Be Real'
Byline: As Told To Hilary Shenfeld Just before 3 p.m. on Valentine's Day, a 27-year-old man named Stephen Kazmierczak carried four guns into a packed lecture hall at Northern Illinois University as class was ending and opened fire, killing five...
Life after Chess
Byline: Steven Levy Former champ Garry Kasparov still sees the world in terms of pawns and kings--and thinks you should, too. No one, ever, was a greater master of the chessboard than Garry Kasparov, whose 22-year reign as world champion set...
Mambo on My Mind
Byline: Robert Farris Thompson; Thompson Lives In New Haven, Conn. I was turned on to the hard-swinging sound at a young age. It has animated my soul ever since. What's an old white man like me doing teaching Afro-Cuban music, art and history?...
Moving toward Change
Byline: Christopher Dickey And Rana Foroohar Four Turkish business leaders discuss the future. It's not often you can sit down to tea in one room with the bulk of a nation's economic power. But at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos, representatives...
Myth Meets Science
Byline: Jeneen Interlandi Everybody's talking about human growth hormone, and lots of people are using it. But what does it do? Last week, when Roger Clemens told a congressional committee that it was his wife, not he, who had used human growth...
Not Made in Japan
Byline: Christian Caryl; With Akiko Kashiwagi In Tokyo Once upon a time, the country was a leader in technology. Now it's struggling to find its place in the digital age. Can an entrenched corporate culture change? Heard of DoCoMo? Probably not,...
Our Imaginary, Hotter Selves
Byline: Sharon Begley Avatars might serve therapeutic purposes, helping those with social phobia become more confident. Anyone who has ever had a bad hair day, when looking like a latter-day Medusa makes you feel cranky and antisocial and plodding,...
Part of Something Larger
Byline: Howard Fineman ***** Correction: In "Part Of Something Larger" we said that Harold Washington was Chicago's first and only black mayor. In fact, he was the first and only elected black mayor. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** By...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: AP(2), The Washington Post, MSNBC, The Washington Post, AP, Bloomberg, Financial Times. "Retaliation is the way of the world. What we do to others, they will do to us--but worse." West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller,...
Pop Goes the Easel
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Gunpowder is a pretty destructive art material. Cai Guo-Qiang uses it on paper and in sculpture-like pyrotechnics. The results are explosive--and gorgeous. Cai Guo-Qiang Compares setting off explosives to making love:...
Russia's Mighty Mouse
Byline: Owen Matthews; With Anna Nemtsova In St. Petersburg Vladimir Putin's handpicked successor seems like a loyal nobody. But he could turn out to be a welcome surprise. In a high-ceilinged room at the St. Petersburg mayor's office in 1992,...
Say 'Cheese!' and Now Say 'Airbrush!'
Byline: Jessica Bennett The grade-school class portrait is a time capsule of sorts--a bittersweet reminder of forgotten cowlicks, blemishes and buckteeth. Awkward, at least in retrospect, is awfully cute. So it's sad to think that those mortifying...
Scoping out Obama vs. McCain
Byline: Jonathan Alter The race would pit change vs. experience, fresh vs. tested, green vs. gray. The democratic race isn't over yet. Hillary Clinton may still prevail. But the debate featuring Barack Obama and John McCain has already begun....
'Seven Cows and A Dream'
Byline: Gary Hirshberg; Hirshberg Is President And CEO Of Stonyfield Farm Yogurt. The cofounder of Stonyfield Farm Yogurt hated business as a young man. Now he's trying to run a company that doesn't hurt the planet but still turns a profit. I...
That Ms. Turner Can Still Turn Heads
Kathleen Turner has written a memoir, "Send Yourself Roses," in which she dishes about her costars. She spoke with Nicki Gostin. Why write a memoir now? A lot of it was getting to a certain place in my life where I felt I had 30 years in the...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Politicians' marriages are not very different from yours or mine: ultimately mysterious to everyone on the outside, and probably somewhat mysterious to the two people on the inside. But there is at least one critical distinction....
The End of Conservatism
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Conservative slogans sound anachronistic in the context of today's problems, like an old TV show from the 1970s. Conservatives are a gloomy bunch at the moment. Many believe that their party--the Republican Party--has lost...
The Fox Is Hunted Down
Hizbullah's Imad Mugniyah was responsible for some of the deadliest attacks on Americans on record. His death will likely spark more killings. Even on Imad Mugniyah's home turf, in the southern suburbs of Beirut, his associates didn't dare speak...
The Twilight of the Moguls
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts John Malone helped build a generation of media titans like no other--only to cut them down to size and reveal them as mere mortals. Just ask Barry Diller. I f the enemy of my enemy is my friend, as the old chestnut...
Votes in an Era of Fear
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau After more than five years as a leading member of Pakistan's National Assembly, Maulana Fazlur Rehman had to run for re-election without daring to leave his house. Despite his dedication to Islamist causes,...
What Becomes A Legend Most?
Byline: Joshua Alston An Oscar, at 83, would be nice. But Ruby Dee isn't done yet. In 2005, an interviewer made the mistake of referring to Ruby Dee's career as though it were ancient history. "You've had such a long and storied career --" he...
Wide-Open Space for Sale
Byline: Amy Green and Arian Campo-Flores Amid the gloom of the real-estate downturn, one group has cause to celebrate: conservationists. Rising housing inventories and slackening demand are causing some developers to sell unused tracts and hold...