Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 14, April 7

A Complicated Record on Race
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick; With Eve Conant In Washington And Sarah Kliff In New York All sides of the affirmative-action debate think Barack Obama agrees with them. And he might. When it comes to the question of race in America, Barack Obama is...
A Conversation about What's Worth the Fight
Force can only be the last option, McCain says, but the world is a dangerous place. A NEWSWEEK interview. Sen. John McCain spoke with NEWSWEEK's Michael Hirsh about the confrontation with Iran, renewed violence in Iraq and his temper, among other...
All in the Family
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh And Larry Kaplow; With Iraqi Staff In Baghdad And Karbala Renewed violence in Iraq has devolved into an intra-Shiite blood feud. Abbas and Ahmed usually try not to talk politics. They're both Shias from Karbala--brothers,...
An Assault on Supplies
Byline: Sami Yousafzai, Ron Moreau and John Barry The Taliban may have discovered a worrisome new target: the main supply conduit for food, fuel and military equipment to U.S. forces in Afghanistan. While Pakistan rethinks its support for the war...
A Race Fight Roils China
Byline: Melinda Liu With Tibet in turmoil and the 2008 Olympics looming, Beijing is trying to repair its international image. The strategy is a familiar one: control the story. China's state-run Xinhua news agency has packaged official FAQs on the...
Bathing John Malkovich
Byline: Brian Braiker John Malkovich's latest role is a bit of a shocker: the A-list thespian can be seen now in a fleshy video at Superdeluxe.com, sitting in a bathtub. With another man. Getting the business end of a loofah. No, this is not...
Employers Aren't Biting
Byline: Linda Stern Let interviewers know you're talking to others. Expect to take at least six months to find a good job. Here's a case of bad timing: being midcareer in midrecession. In February, 63,000 U.S. jobs evaporated; 17,000 were lost...
Fun with Mick & Keith
Byline: David Ansen Scorsese's 'Shine a Light' proves that, after all these years, the Rolling Stones still gather no moss. Can you picture yourself at age 60 doing what you're doing now?" asks Dick Cavett of Mick Jagger in a 1972 TV interview....
How to Win in A Knife Fight
The Democratic race could well come down to the first contested convention in years. Lessons on how to prevail. After the last Democratic Primary is held in early June, neither Hillary Clinton nor Barack Obama will have enough votes from delegates...
In Praise of A Humble Coin
Byline: James A. Fragale; Fragale Lives In New York City. Friends laugh at my obsession with pennies. But the one-centers add up to a cause my mother would love. I am a grown, working man who bends over and picks up pennies on the streets of...
Just Go to Helvetica
Byline: Jessica Bennett Or at least to Verdana. Because without a signature font at the moment, you'll never be letter-perfect. I've changed fonts nine times while writing this piece, even though I know NEWSWEEK will print it in regular old Vincent...
Liar, Liar, Parents on Fire
Byline: Kathleen Deveny I have promised I would be home at 6:30, even though I knew in my heart I would never make it. When my daughter asked me why it was embarrassing that former New York governor Eliot Spitzer was involved with a cowgirl ring,...
Mr. Stewart Loves His Trekkies
Byline: Nicki Gostin Patrick Stewart is opening on Broadway in "Macbeth." He spoke to Nicki Gostin. Everyone says you're a lock for the Tony. I get very nervous, because like most people in show business I'm very superstitious. I'm old enough...
Perspectives
"Not only were there no bullets flying around, there was no bumblebee flying around." Retired Col. William Changose, the Air Force pilot who flew Hillary Clinton into Bosnia in 1996, debunking a story from the presidential hopeful, who has said...
Plight of the Teenage Insomniacs
Byline: Claudia Kalb Rachel Estrella, A high-school senior in Barrington, R.I., gets into bed every night before 10, hoping to beat her insomnia. One frustrating hour later, she gets up. She reads. She writes. She waits. Finally, at 1 or 2 a.m.,...
Tastes Great, Less Billing
Byline: Roxana Popescu In a world without price tags or labels, which wines would rule? Food writer Robin Goldstein offers an answer in "The Wine Trials," a new book based on a blind taste test of 540 wines, priced between $1.50 and $150. Goldstein's...
Theater of War
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan 'South Pacific' is getting its first Broadway revival in nearly 60 years, and it looks as good as new. Even if you don't give a hoot about musical theater, you can probably hum a few bars from "South Pacific." And if...
The Curious Lives of Surrogates
Byline: Lorraine Ali And Raina Kelley; With Jeneen Interlandi And Daniel Stone Thousands of largely invisible American women have given birth to other people's babies. Many are married to men in the military. Jennifer Cantor, a 34-year-old surgical...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham A few months ago, Julia Baird, the editor who oversees our science and family coverage, kept coming across stories about Americans (and Brits) going to India to look for surrogates--stories that were prompting angry online debates...
The New Super Tuesday
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores And Sarah Kliff; With Suzanne Smalley In New York Primaries in Indiana and North Carolina on May 6 may be the last chance to end the Dem race early. Not since Bobby Kennedy campaigned in Indiana 40 years ago have Hoosiers...
The Opium Brides of Afghanistan
Byline: Sami Yousafzai And Ron Moreau; With Marie Bourreau In Nangarhar In the country's poppy-growing provinces, farmers are being forced to sell their daughters to pay loans. Khalida's father says she's 9--or maybe 10. As much as Sayed Shah...
The Tales Hillary Tells
Byline: Jonathan Alter Politicians by nature construct personal narratives about themselves that make them seem shinier, if not larger than life. We know why politicians lie when they get in trouble: they think the consequences of telling the...
The World According to John McCain
Byline: Michael Hirsh; With Holly Bailey He's both the consummate pragmatist and a zealous crusader for causes he feels just. The question is which America needs now. "We need to listen," John McCain was saying, "to the views -- of our democratic...
Today's 'Culture of Poverty'
Byline: Daniel Gross The overclass is better connected than the underclass, and it can cause more damage. For decades, social scientists, policy wonks and politicians have studied and debated what's come to be known as the culture of poverty....
You Can't Take It with You
Byline: Peter G. Peterson Blackstone's Peterson made a mint, then chose to give it away to solve U.S. economic challenges. The turning point in my life came before I was born. It was the day in 1912 when my Greek immigrant father came to America....
'Your Brain on Cubs'
Byline: George F. Will It is said there are no atheists in foxholes. There should be lots of them in Wrigley Field in the Cubs' 10th decade of rebuilding. Aren't cartoons supposed to be funny? In a New Yorker cartoon, a man and a woman are seated...