Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 21, May 25

A Conversation with Barack Obama
Byline: Jon Meacham What he's like now He did it because he could. Last Wednesday, in the gathering cool of late afternoon, Marine One brought President Barack Obama to the tarmac at Andrews Air Force Base. As he climbed down the steps of the...
A Highly Logical Approach
Byline: Jon Meacham In a 30-minute interview aboard Air Force One en route from Washington to Phoenix last Wednesday, President Obama talked with NEWSWEEK's Jon Meacham about Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Dick Cheney--and Star Trek. Edited...
A New Magazine for a Changing World
Byline: Jon Meacham It is no secret that the business of journalism is in trouble. Venerable American institutions are facing uncertain futures; once profitable enterprises are struggling to find ways to fund their operations. At an otherwise lighthearted...
Cheaper by the Dozen
Byline: Julia Reed When I was in my early 20s, my good buddy McGee generously moved to a penthouse apartment in Paris for three years. On the first of my (numerous) visits, we went out for "French" pizza, and when it arrived, I was a tad unnerved...
'Confessions,' Cont'd
Byline: Jonathan Darman An update to our April 27 cover story: A journalistic flare-up over whether NEWSWEEK played a role in Eliot Spitzer's political rehab. I wasn't thrilled at the prospect of speaking to Eliot Spitzer after the publication...
Death in a Libyan Jail Cell
Byline: Michael Isikoff And Mark Hosenball The Obama Administration is pressing the Libyan government to explain the reported prison death of a former CIA detainee--an incident that U.S. officials fear could reopen questions about the agency's "extraordinary...
Dick Takes Manhattan
Byline: Howard Fineman; Fineman is NEWSWEEK's Senior Washington Correspondent and author of The Thirteen American Arguments. So now the ex-veep can't stop talking Dick Cheney hadn't planned to speak, but others at the dinner in Manhattan noticed...
Don't Pass the Torch to China
Byline: Christian Caryl Today more than ever, Beijing seems unstoppable. While the United States is trying to fight a massive economic contraction and to restore its image, China is growing and extending its influence. Last month at the Boao Forum...
Erasing Autism
Byline: Claudia Kalb Scientists are closing in on the genes linked to autism. So why is Ari Ne'eman so worried? It's spring in Washington, and Ari Ne'e-man, with his navy suit and leather brief-case on wheels, is in between his usual flurry of...
Getting to Know Obama
The sides we're just starting to see Barack Obama began his presidency with an unusual attribute, namely that the country already thought it understood him. The story he told in his two books was about a man of multiple worlds who comes to terms...
Hard Target
Byline: Scott Johnson The hunt for Africa's last warlord Shortly after dawn last Dec. 14, four Ugandan Mi-24 helicopters banked low over the thick forest canopy of Congo's Garamba National Park. A dense fog had rolled in overnight, and the weather...
High Times
Byline: David Wallace-Wells The little animation studio that could, Pixar was established in 1986 not as a cartoon factory but as a computer manufacturer. Many on the skeleton staff were cartoonists at heart, but the shorts they produced on company...
How to Sell a Better Pope
Byline: Lisa Miller; Miller Is NEWSWEEK's Religion Editor. Tips for the holy handlers I say this with respect: Pope Benedict XVI has a public-relations problem. You need only remember the 2000 visit of John Paul II to Jerusalem--which earned...
Idol Chatter
When we host one of our NEWSWEEK Roundtables (say, for the Oscars or the Emmys), we do it in person, and with the doors locked so the stars can't escape (just kidding). We tried that for our first American Idol Roundtable, but unlike George Clooney,...
I, Robot
Byline: Daniel Lyons Ray Kurzweil can't wait to be a Cyborg--a human mind inside an everlasting machine. But is this the next great leap in human evolution, or just one man's midlife crisis writ large? Ray Kurzweil's wildest dream is to be turned...
Nico Suave
Byline: Seth Colter Walls A classical composer who's so cool, even indie hipsters love him. Don't hate Nico Muhly just because he's popular. Though classical composers aren't supposed to get any love until they're old (or dead), the 27-year-old...
Paulson's Complaint
Byline: Evan Thomas And Michael Hirsh; With Suzanne Smalley, Matthew Philips and Nick Summers Lehman Brothers disappeared with Hank Paulson's reputation. He wants it back Hank Paulson, former master of the universe, sits in a nondescript office...
Poor but Sexy
Byline: Stefan Theil In Paris, laid-off factory workers have taken to kidnapping their bosses. London riots in early April left one man dead outside the Bank of England. In laid-back Berlin, the global economic crisis has, so far, been just another...
Ray Lahood, Transformed
Byline: George F. Will Secretary of Behavior Modification You might think the Department of Transportation would be a refuge from Washington's inundation of painfully earnest and pitilessly incessant talk about "remaking" this (health care, Detroit)...
Saving Money Is a Lifesaver
Byline: Melinda French Gates; Gates is co-chair and trustee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Innovation is helping to bring safe financial services to the doorsteps of Africa's poor. Earlier this year I met with a group of women in...
The Afterlife of George W. Bush
Patrick Bibb, a 19-year-old from Dallas, glanced at his cell phone. He was in the middle of his economics class at Texas Christian University on a February morning. His caller ID read withheld. He decided not to answer. When class ended, he checked...
The First 1,000 Days
Bloomberg reflects on Obama Franklin Delano Roosevelt is probably enjoying a good laugh at our continuing fascination with a president's first 100 days, perhaps the most meaningless yardstick in all of government. Many of the legislative achievements...
The Sky Isn't Falling
Our world is more stable than we think It certainly looks like another example of crying wolf. After bracing ourselves for a global pandemic, we've suffered something more like the usual seasonal influenza. Three weeks ago the World Health Organization...
The Speaker Is in the House
Byline: Tina Brown; Brown is the cofounder and editor of The Daily Beast and author of The Diana Chronicles. Nancy Pelosi is a bit like Britain's Margaret Thatcher in reverse. Mrs. T. was tough and steely in her public role as prime minister, but...
Try the Beef and Broccoli
P.F. Chang's simple recipe for profits During a recession, making macaroni and cheese for dinner instead of heading to the Macaroni Grill is a no-brainer. And so the vast casual-dining sector, which grew fat during the late free-spending consumer...
Why Is This Spy Smiling?
Byline: Evan Thomas A long row of windows runs along the seventh floor of the Central Intelligence Agency's headquarters in Langley, Va. Some belong to the office of the director of Central Intelligence (the DCI) and some to the deputy director...