Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 154, No. 21, November 23

An Evolutionary Edge
Byline: Sharon Begley How grandmas may play favorites. The question is asked in every language, in every era: "So, dear, when will you give me grandchildren?" Darwin would approve. At least he would if the "grandma hypothesis" is right. According...
Back to the Future
Byline: Daniel Lyons Will competitors lap the iPhone? When I started on the tech beat, desktop PCs, which were beginning to replace minicomputers, were a big deal. Today the excitement has moved to mobile devices, also known as smart phones....
Bazooka Joe
Byline: Jonathan Alter Lieberman's comic health-care ploy. A decade ago, Joe Lieberman was a source of great pride for American Jews. Now Jews (who voted 78 percent for Barack Obama) are debating a critical question: why is Joe such a putz? Tough...
Could This [Image of Pellet on Layout] Power the [Image of Planet Earth on Layout]?
Byline: Daniel Lyons Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab are betting $3.5 billion in taxpayer money on a tiny pellet that could produce an endless supply of safe, clean energy. For some, that's hard to swallow. It doesn't look like...
Fowl Ball
Byline: Julia Reed It turns out that the Plymouth Rock pilgrims probably did not dine on turkey during that first Thanksgiving feast in 1621. We only know for sure that Governor Bradford sent "four men fowling" after wild geese and ducks, and that...
Free the Hikers
Byline: Alex Fattal; The hikers' families maintain the Web site Freethehikers.org. There are certain crises that always loom as possibilities: a chronic illness in the family, strife in a relationship, a car accident. To have a brother detained...
Gone Rogue
Byline: Evan Thomas Moderate Republicans--yes, they are not yet extinct, though most are in hiding--scoff at Sarah Palin and wish she would go away. But she's not going away. This week she's going on-air with Barbara Walters and Oprah Winfrey to...
Half a Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Waste
Byline: Alan Brinkley; Brinkley is the Allan Nevins professor of history and former provost at Columbia University. The idea that we must choose between science and humanities is false. In the heady progressive years of the early 20th century,...
Is America Losing Its Mojo?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Innovation is as American as baseball and apple pie. But some traditions can't be trademarked. By most measures, America remains the world leader in technological achievement. Consider the 2009 Nobel Prizes: of the 13 people...
Kings of Queens
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Even if you've never seen glee, the Fox dramedy with show tunes in its veins and opera in its nervous system, you probably know that it's TV's gayest product since Richard Simmons. Last week's episode centered on a singing...
Moderate to the Extreme
Byline: Jacob Weisberg Obama, Muslims, and Fort Hood. When it comes to any issue that involves Islam, President Obama starts with an advantage and a disadvantage. The advantage is that he's seen as sympathetic to Muslims. The disadvantage is...
Mourning Joe
Byline: Jeremy McCarter If you want to understand Joe Papp, don't think of his story as a showbiz fable, though it's certainly one of those: the poor Brooklyn, N.Y., kid who built a theatrical empire is one of the most captivating characters in...
Obama's Malpractice
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Why the health-care bill isn't reform. There is an air of absurdity to what is mistakenly called "health-care reform." Everyone knows that the United States faces massive governmental budget deficits as far as calculators...
Palin's Basic Instincts
Byline: Christopher Hitchens; Hitchens is a Newsweek Contributor and a Columnist for Vanity Fair. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Ernest Gruening: war veteran, former editor of The Nation magazine, and Franklin Roosevelt's nominee for governorship...
People Who Need People
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Jessica Ramirez in New York Employment is poised to rebound. Like some gothic serial novelist, the Bureau of Labor Statistics delivers another chapter of the same grim tale on the first Friday of every month. In October...
Q&A: Richard Curtis
Byline: Sarah Ball A ragtag crew of DJs rule in Pirate Radio, about an illicit '60s English pop station. The writer-director spoke to Sarah Ball. You send up Parliament in this movie--getting political? I am thinking of writing a film vaguely...
Soldiers of Fortune
How the Israeli Army became the most prolific innovation engine on earth. How does Israel--with fewer people than the state of New Jersey, no natural resources, and hostile nations all around--produce more tech companies listed on the NASDAQ than...
Stupak Is as Stupak Does
Byline: Deidre Depke Why Obama is losing women. Hours after the House passed the Affordable Health Care for America Act, debate veered violently away from the economics and merits of the bill and toward the familiar American quagmire of abortion...
The CIA on Trial?
Byline: Michael Isikoff, Daniel Klaidman, and Mark Hosenball Earlier this year, when justice Department prosecutors began trying to assemble a case against Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four alleged co-conspirators for orchestrating the 9/11 attacks,...
The Decline of Western Innovation
Byline: Daniel McGinn Why America is falling behind and how to fix it. Only a slight breeze blew across the plains of Inner Mongolia on a recent afternoon, but the giant turbines at the Huitengxile Wind Power Field were spinning steadily. This...
The Fight against Al Qaeda Moves to Africa
Byline: Scott Johnson The terror continues in the Sahel, that broad expanse of remote desert stretching from Africa's north Atlantic coast inland to the border of Darfur. In February 2008 gunmen opened fire on the Israeli Embassy in Mauritania....
Why Palin Matters to Obama-And to You
Byline: Jon Meacham Richard Nixon sensed trouble. seated in the cow palace in San Francisco at the GOP convention in 1964, he listened as Barry Goldwater said: "I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty--is--no--vice." A 41-second...
Yes, He Is a Terrorist
Byline: Lisa Miller Religion, insanity, and Nidal Hasan. We are giving ourselves shallow and untenable choices. Does Islam condone violence? Or is it a religion of peace? Is Maj. Nidal Hasan, who murdered 13 people at the Army base in Fort...