Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 18, May 3

America's No. 1 Tree Killer
Byline: Seth Colter Walls A William Vollmann tome of only 528 pages? (At least the subtitle is hefty.) William T. Vollmann's bibliography reads like the result of a drunken dare between literary rivals, with each concept one-upping the last....
A Surge of Their Own
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai All night, every night, an endless caravan of old cars and pickup trucks rolls through the dusty Pakistani town of Datta Khel in North Waziristan's lawless tribal area. The vehicles, headed for Afghanistan,...
Bring the Pope to Justice
Byline: Christopher Hitchens Detain or subpoena the pope for questioning in the child-rape scandal? You must be joking! All right then, try the only alternative formulation: declare the pope to be above and beyond all local and international laws,...
Can You Hear Me Now?
Byline: William Underhill Dark-horse candidate Nick Clegg is poised to upend the U.K's two-party system. It was an offer that many ambitious young Brits would have pounced on. As a bright and energetic Cambridge graduate in the 1990s, Nick Clegg...
Courtly Love
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why an affair fails the 'ick' test. When the U.S. Supreme Court denied Charles Dean Hood's appeal last week, it was done in a one-sentence, unsigned order. Hood is a Texas death-row inmate who was convicted of murdering...
Crisis of Conscience
Byline: Stephen Green The economy was already faltering when I arrived at Italy's Lake Como in the spring of 2008. I was there for a seminar on commerce and finance, one of those Davos-like gatherings where the rainmakers of global capitalism wander...
Cross of Gold
Byline: Fareed Zakaria How the rush to crucify Goldman Sachs is clouding our judgment and distorting public policy. Imagine that you want to make a bet against a sports team, say the New York Yankees. The Yankees have had a strong run, but, poring...
Enron on Broadway: $How Business
Byline: Daniel Gross Finally, someone put the drama on Wall Street to good use--and it's not CNBC. The plot of an engaging play debuting on Broadway this week is ripped straight from The Wall Street Journal. In the opening scene, high-living...
Fortress Apple
Byline: Daniel Lyons The company needs to open up. Apple's new iPad is more than just a gorgeous consumer electronics device. It's also a kind of challenge to the Internet itself--or at least to the conventional wisdom of what the Internet is...
Golden Girl
Byline: Joshua Alston In age-obsessed Hollywood, Betty White, at 88, is having the last laugh. At 88, Betty White is an unlikely candidate for Hollywood's buzziest actress, and yet here she is in the thick of an irony-free resurgence. Hot on...
Goldman Wasn't Alone
Byline: Matthew Philips The practices at the center of the current controversy didn't begin with Goldman--and they didn't end there, either. "This is Lloyd on Sunday in New York," the voice mail began. Two days after the SEC sued Goldman Sachs...
Guarding the Henhouse
Byline: Howard Fineman A Goldman alum turns Wall Street overseer. Growing up in Baltimore in the 1960s, Gary Gensler learned about business and politics and how they are related. His father owned vending machines, and Gary would accompany him...
Hillary Clinton: 'Get in There and Mix It Up'
Byline: Michael Hirsh Hillary Clinton on Obama, Iran, and a world of troubles. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sat down for a 40-minute interview last week with NEWSWEEK's Michael Hirsh at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Tallinn, Estonia, where...
Movement 'Mother'
Byline: Ellis Cose The legacy of Dorothy Height. Dorothy Height's name is unknown to most Americans. Yet her death last week at the age of 98 spawned tributes worthy of a saint. President Barack Obama proclaimed her "the godmother of the civil-rights...
Obama's Bad Cop
Byline: Michael Hirsh Clinton's played the heavy with Iran, Russia, and even Israel--and her sometimes hawkish views are finding favor with the president. It was almost like one of those moments in a buddy-cop movie when the two partners who...
Requiem for 'Responsible' Republicans
Byline: George F. Will The reddest state has the most endangered one. Utah, the reddest state, may soon become redder because it has the nation's most vulnerable Republican senator. Senate candidate selection events there (May 8), in Indiana...
Rock and Roll's Day Has Come
Byline: Jeremy Mccarter On second thought, maybe the Beatles didn't kill the Broadway musical. For half a century, theater folk have cursed rock and roll---including a certain diabolical quartet from Liverpool--for driving show tunes from American...
The Coffee Party Heats Up
Byline: Steve Tuttle Tired of all the Tea Party talk, Annabel Park decided to throw a Coffee Party--and 200,000 people showed up. When Annabel Park imagined what it would be like to head a new national political movement, here is what she had...
The Days the Earth Stood Still
Byline: Daniel Gross With a huff and a puff, mother nature grounded the global economy--and pointed up the need to fix our fragile system. As the ash cloud emanating from an Icelandic volcano wreaked havoc on global travel, Cisco Systems completed...
The Religious Case for Church-State Separation
Byline: Jon Meacham Here we go again. On April 15 a federal judge in Wisconsin ruled that the National Day of Prayer, slated for May 6, was unconstitutional. The usual voices have been heard rising in objection (Sarah Palin and Franklin Graham among...
The Streets Run Red in Thailand
Byline: Joshua Kurlantzick As Thailand's protracted political crisis spirals into violence, almost everyone keeps repeating the same diagnosis: class warfare between rich Bangkok residents and the poor masses, clad in red shirts and out for blood....
The World Upside Down
Byline: Rana Foroohar Is Greece the new Paraguay? Europe has had plenty of embarrassing moments in recent weeks. Aside from the inept response to the Icelandic volcano, which also shot a cloud of jokes onto Facebook (my favorite: "Europe to Iceland:...
'This Is Brand New'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The CEO of Bloom Energy on a new way of powering the planet. K. R. Sridhar spent years building technologies for NASA that could sustain life on Mars. Now, as CEO of Bloom Energy, he's trying to perfect a device that could...