Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 6

A New 'Wind Tunnel' for Companies
Byline: Rana Foroohar Companies are always trying to predict the future. These days, the field of experimental economics--which replicates market and business scenarios in the lab--is giving the crystal ball an upgrade. Hewlett-Packard scientists,...
A Taxicab at 30,000 Feet: Aviation Mavericks Are Trying to Mint a New Class of Airplane-And Air Travel
Byline: Brad Stone It's hard to expect world-altering change from the two biggest airplane manufacturers, Boeing and Europe's Airbus; they have too big a stake in the status quo. Boeing's new plane, the 7E7 Dreamliner, due in 2008, will use new...
Business's Killer I.O.U. New Factories? More Workers? They'll Have to Wait. Pension Shortfalls Are Costing Corporations Billions
Byline: Keith Naughton With car sales surprisingly strong, J. T. Battenberg III, CEO of auto-parts maker Delphi Automotive, would like to expand his factories and hire some workers. But he can't. And it's not because his products aren't in demand--Delphi...
Cut! No Sequels, Please. the Crazy Recall Campaign Rolls into Its Final Frame
Byline: Karen Breslau The big-budget thriller that began with Arnold Schwarzenegger's dropping a bomb on "The Tonight Show" ends with next Tuesday's recall vote--but not before a climactic chase scene that's one part "Terminator 3" and one part...
Free Pass for the President
Byline: Anna Quindlen The most underplayed story of the past month was the one about the events of September 11 and Saddam Hussein. There is no direct link between the two. This despite the fact that George W. Bush and the members of his administration...
Here's a Bet for Mr. Rumsfeld
Byline: Fareed Zakaria When it comes to Iraq, the Bush administration's attitude toward the world seems strangely self-defeating. Even though America's armed forces are strained beyond their limits, the bill for reconstruction is astronomical and...
Iraq's Mr. Popularity: The French Have Staked out a Position as the Un-America. but That Doesn't Mean Their Advice Is Necessarily Wrong
Byline: Christopher Dickey What is wrong with those Iraqis? The United States and Britain freed them from Saddam Hussein and, sure, the vast majority say that's great: a poll released last week finds that 62 percent think liberty is worth the hardship....
Let's Go to Space! One Hundred Years after the Wright Brothers' Famous Flight, a New Breed of Entrepreneur Is Pushing New Technologies to Their Limits, Turning Science Fiction into Reality
Byline: Brad Stone It was a perfect morning in the Mojave desert last week and almost a calamitous one. At dawn, a white twin-tailed airplane made of graphite composite emerged from the secrecy of an enclosed airport hangar and taxied to the runway....
Losing 'Friends': They Won't Be There for You-Not Much Longer, Anyway. Behind the Scenes as 'Friends' Begins Its Final Season, and Great Sitcoms Become an Endangered Species
Byline: Marc Peyser You'd think it was a simple enough scene. Chandler, Joey and Rachel are in their apartment--that is, the apartment Joey and Chandler shared before Chandler moved in with Monica and Rachel had the baby and moved in with Joey--and...
Newsmakers
Byline: Mark Starr, Jennifer Ordonez Beautiful Losers? Baseball's winners begin the postseason this week, but the losers have the best shot at immortality. Heading into the final Sunday, the Detroit Tigers had lost 119 games, and with one last...
Out of the Blue: Five Years Ago 'Undersea Tourism' Meant Scuba Diving in the Shallows. Now, All It Takes to Fathom the Deepest Waters Is Bravery, Curiosity and a Few Thousand Bucks
Byline: Mary Carmichael There are corners of the ocean that Navy Capt. Alfred McLaren has never seen, but to hear him recount his life story, it's hard to believe they'll stay hidden from him for long. At the age of 4, he decided his life's ambition...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Associated Press, Los Angeles Times, Daily Herald, AFP, "The Sharon Osbourne Show," World Net Daily, Associated Press, State Hornet (Sacramento), Atlanta Journal-Constitution, New York Post, BBC News, Ananova...
Phoenix from the Ashes: Kofi Annan Was a Quiet Diplomat Reluctant to Battle America. an Assault on the United Nations in Iraq Changed All That
Byline: Richard Wolffe Inside the dowdy lobby of the United Nations headquarters, opposite a collection of children's paintings about world peace, there's a photo display of about two dozen U.N. officials. Through the course of last week, as the...
Road Trip: Are You There, God? It's Me, Tom Levinson
Byline: Elise Soukup In the summer of 1999, Tom Levinson, a fourth-generation Jewish New Yorker and a recent Harvard Divinity School grad, packed up his 1994 Nissan Altima and hit the road to talk to people about God. Seventy cities, 105 days and...
Surrender Monkeys --Not: The NATO Supreme Commander Speaks Out
Byline: Christopher Dickey Gen. James L. Jones is the first U.S. Marine to serve as NATO's Supreme Allied Commander, Europe. Having grown up in France, where his father worked for an American company after WWII, he has a keen sense of Continental...
Terrorism: Islamic Clerics at Guantanamo: Worrisome Ties
Byline: Mark Hosenball, Michael Isikoff and Andrew Murr The Pentagon is re-examining its military-chaplain program after officials confirmed that Islamic clerics assigned to minister to suspected terrorists detained in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, were...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker My kids love "Friends." So when I can make it home by 8 o'clock on Thursdays, we order takeout Chinese food and watch as a family. Some things about the show have always bothered me, like the cast's lack of diversity (until...
The Limits of Media Power: We're Often Accused of Spreading 'Gloom and Doom' and Threatening the Economy. the First Charge Is Sometimes True. the Second Isn't
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson In my business, you receive a lot of unsolicited advice and abuse. Some years ago a reader proposed that I "drop dead." Another well-wisher later suggested that "the best thing you could say is nothing at all." One of...
The Unbuilding of Iraq: PERFECT STORM: Wrongheaded Assumptions. Ideological Blinders. Weak Intelligence, Missteps, Poor Coordination and Bad Luck. How Team Bush's Reconstruction Efforts Went off the Rails from Day One
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas The Iraq war had yet to begin, but some nasty fighting was already going on back in Washington between the Department of Defense and the Department of State. Last February, retired Lt. Gen. Jay Garner was trying...
Those Who Hold the Keys Are Listening: At the Hospital I Was Committed to as a Teenager, I Confronted Doctors I Once Considered the 'Enemy'
Byline: Mindy Lewis I stand at the podium looking out at the audience: more than a hundred psychiatrists, psychiatric residents, supervisors, psychologists and other members of the hospital staff. It is a momentous day for me. I am the guest speaker...
Travel: Got a Ticket to Drive
Byline: Tara Weingarten You could hop in the family minivan, tour the countryside and call it a driving vacation. Or you could jump into a sports car and whip around hairpin turns like Jeff Gordon. Now that's a driving vacation. High-performance...
Travels with Brittany: Goodbye, Roasted Marshmallows. A Generation of Adrenaline-Driven Teens Takes Camping to a New Level
Byline: Susannah Meadows Brittany Lagrega, 14, is leaving Long Island, N.Y., in a few days for a camping trip on steroids--rock climbing in the Grand Tetons, white-water kayaking and hiking more than 30 miles with a 50-pound pack on her back, all...
Up, Up and Away: Millionaire Adventurer Steve Fossett May Be Best Known for His Round-the-World Solo Balloon Voyage Last Year-But Now He's Aiming Even Higher
Byline: Jerry Adler Steve Fossett was home last week in Beaver Creek, Colo.--not where you usually find him--keeping an eye on the wind. Before that, he was in Omarama, New Zealand, waiting for the right weather conditions to fly his specially outfitted...
What, Me Worry? HOME ALONE: The Numbers Are off. the World Won't Heed His Call to Arms. but If Bush Is Fretting about His Future, He Won't Show It. Inside Karl Rove's Game Plan
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper Two Septembers ago, George W. Bush seemed to have found a home in Manhattan. Standing on the rubble of the World Trade Center, bullhorn in hand, the president summoned a seething country and a sympathetic...