Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 25

10 Power Tips; What Are the Real Secrets of Success? Here's What Some Proven Winners Say
Byline: Julie Scelfo Be competitive: "To succeed in business you have to want to win," says Liz Lange, founder and president of Liz Lange Maternity. "Too often, women feel they have to be nice. Don't," says Lange. It's not about friendship:...
A Turn for Telenovelas; the Nets Are Looking to Spanish Soaps for Inspiration. Can They Translate Them for English Audiences?
Byline: Jennifer Ordonez Like so many first-generation Latin Americans, Silvio Horta grew up in a Spanish-speaking home in Miami where each night his mother had the TV tuned to one thing: telenovelas . In the Spanish- language soap operas, which...
Beliefwatch 12/21/12
***** CORRECTION: CORRECTION: A photo caption in "Beliefwatch: 12/21/12" (Periscope, Sept 25) erroneously identified Machu Picchu as a Mayan site. It was built by the Incas. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Holly Lebowitz Rossi ...
Documentary: West Virginia Princess
Byline: Elise Soukup It's something that every little girl fantasizes about ... that the phone will ring and the voice on the other end of the line will tell her she's not the lonely, gawky girl that she thought she was. No, she is, in fact, a princess....
Everyday Equality; Each of Us Rose on the Shoulders of Women Who Had Come before Us. Move Up, Reach Down: That Was the Motto of Those Worth Knowing
Byline: Anna Quindlen I came to feminism the way some people come to social movements in their early years: out of self-interest. As a teenager, I was outspoken and outraged, which paired with a skirt was once considered arrogance. When I was expelled...
Fighting over the Kids; Battered Spouses Take Aim at a Controversial Custody Strategy
Byline: Sarah Childress It took six years for Genia Shockome to gather the courage to leave her husband, Tim. He pushed her, kicked her and insulted her almost from the moment they married in 1994, she says. She tried to start over with their children...
Getting Back on Track; Women Who Take Career 'Off Ramps' to Raise Children Often Have Trouble Finding 'On Ramps' When They Are Ready to Work Again. Now Companies in Need of Talent Are Finally Addressing the Problem
Byline: Daniel McGinn (With Robbie Brown and Claudia Adrien) It's 4:30 on a weekday afternoon and ordinarily Caterina Bandini would be tracking headlines, tweaking scripts and preparing to take her seat at the anchor desk for the 5 o'clock news...
Harvard Opts out; Will Ending Early Action Ease Admissions Frenzy?
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh (With Lee Hudson Teslik and Matthew Philips) While many educators fretted over Harvard's announcement last week that it was rescinding its Early Admissions policy, Azusa Pacific University stood firm. It will not end Early...
Hot Wheels; the Classic-Car Market Is on Fire, Thanks Mostly to Nostalgic Baby Boomers with Plenty of Cash
Byline: Tara Weingarten In 1991, shallow pockets forced Bill Wiemann to sell his 12 muscle cars. He got $200,000 for a collection that included a '69 Plymouth 6-Pack Road Runner, a '70 Dodge Charger and a '70 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda (think the General...
Intelligence: How Close Is Iran to Having Nuclear Weapons?
Byline: Mark Hosenball American intel agencies appear to be pushing back against conservatives who claim that their judgments about Iran's nuclear program are not hair-raising enough. In a development that reminded some experts of the fights over...
Leading the Way; These Women Are Poised to Be the Next Generation of Leaders in Their Fields-Whether It's Sports, Business, Finance, Politics or the Arts. in Their Own Words, They Tell How They Got Where They Are and Where They Hope to Go Next
Byline: Interviews by Barbara Kantrowitz, Holly Peterson and Karen Breslau Danica Patrick Race-car driver I started racing go-carts when I was 10 and, to be honest, the competitiveness started right away. It wasn't like a fun car track; it...
Lessons We Have Learned; Accomplished Leaders in Their Varied Fields Share Their Hard-Earned Wisdom about Success, Failure and Not Letting Yourself off the Hook
Byline: Interviews by Holly Peterson and Barbara Kantrowitz Ruth Simmons President, Brown University So often in the workplace, women assume that they have to be just like everybody else, and downplay whatever is unique about them. I think...
Make Room on the Couch for Steve; Our Computers Have Become Great Media Devices for Songs, Pictures and Now TV and Movies
Byline: Steven Levy Steve Jobs's talk last week was nearing an end and coming dangerously close to a letdown. The stuff he introduced--a freshening-up of the iPod line and the ability to download movies on iTunes--had been largely expected. And...
Moms Mean Business; Inspired by the Dot-Com Boom, a Growing Number of Women Are Dreaming Up New Ventures While the Kids Are Napping
Byline: Anna Kuchment It wasn't long into my maternity leave when I hatched my first idea for a new business: I'd start a "night-care center" where sleep-deprived parents could drop off their newborns and head home for eight hours of uninterrupted...
Movies: The Good, the Bad, the Hilariously Gross
Byline: David Ansen The studios like to use the Toronto Film Festival as a launching pad for Oscar hopefuls. Last year "Crash" was unveiled here, and look where that ended. There's a risk involved, of course: every major U.S. media outlet has critics...
My Turn: Fear and Loathing on the 'My Turn' Trail; I Hate This Familiar Column but I Read It Every Week. Who Cares about 'My Turn'? Apparently, I Do
Byline: Derek Haas; Haas lives in Los Angeles. Honestly. Do I really care if some mail carrier is having trouble putting his dad in an old folks' home? Am I supposed to get weepy because a young lawyer struggles to put down her family pet? Week...
Newsmakers: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Whitney Houston
Byline: Devin Gordon, Jac Chebatoris Maggie Gyllenhaal In her latest movie, "Sherrybaby," she plays a recovering addict and mother. In November's "Stranger Than Fiction," she's a baker--and the apple of Will Ferrell's eye. She spoke with Devin...
Perspectives
"They're trying to reinterpret the Geneva Conventions." Senate Armed Services Committee member Carl Levin, on why the committee rebuffed a White House plan for trying and interrogating terror suspects "At this point, there is nothing to implicate...
Questions for the Interrogators; No Other Nation Has Sought to Narrow the Geneva Conventions' Scope by 'Clarifying' Them
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) A fierce debate over military tribunals has erupted in Washington. This is great news. The American constitutional system is finally working. The idea that the war on terror...
Science and the Gender Gap; A Generation Ago, Women Physicists and Chemists Were Rare in the Lab, but Their Number Is Increasing Every Year
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Julie Scelfo To get a sense of how women have progressed in science, take a quick tour of the physics department at the University of California, Berkeley. This is a storied place, the site of some of the most important...
Technology: Want to Be a Video Star?
Byline: Anna Kuchment (With Meghan McCain) Ze Frank's daily video blog looks simple enough. In each installment of "The Show" (zefrank.com/theshow ), one of the most popular "vlogs" on the Internet as ranked by technorati.com , the 34-year-old New...
The Democratic Entourage; Can Rahm Emanuel Deliver the House? His Hotshot Hollywood Brother Is Trying to Help Close the Deal
Byline: Howard Fineman And Holly Bailey (With Sean Smith in Los Angeles) It is getting late in the season, but John Yarmuth still wants in--into the club, the entourage. He is the Democratic candidate for Congress in Louisville, Ky., hoping to oust...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker A year ago, we published our first annual Women and Leadership issue, followed by a day-long conference in New York City how women lead. At a panel on balancing work and family, the biggest laughs and most knowing nods went...
The Pope's 'Holy War'; by Quoting a 14th-Century Christian Emperor on an 'Evil and Inhuman' Islam, Benedict XVI Ignites a Global Storm. What Was He Thinking?
Byline: Jon Meacham (With Edward Pentin in Rome) The setting was familiar, the occasion, the speaker thought, fitting. At 3 in the afternoon last Tuesday, after a quick ride from lunch in the Popemobile, Benedict XVI began a lecture in the Aula...
The White House: The Politics of Torture; Lost amid the Legal Wrangling over How to Interrogate Detainees Are the Techniques Used in the War on Terror
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Mark Hosenball (With Michael Isikoff in Washington) Waterboarding, which dates back to the Spanish Inquisition, is an interrogation method that involves strapping a prisoner face up onto a table and pouring water into his...
'This Topic Annoys Me'; after Years of Fielding Questions about the Role of Gender in Her Career, One Fed-Up Astrophysicist Explains Why She's Done Talking about Being a Female Scientist. Forever
Byline: Janna Levin; Janna Levin teaches physics and astronomy at Barnard College in New York City. She is the author of "A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines" (Alfred A. Knopf, 2006). I don't ever want to talk about being a woman scientist again....
To Recapture a City; with America's Top Officer in Iraq on an Exclusive Inspection Tour of Baghdad's Worst Neighborhood
Byline: Rod Nordland Gen. George Casey, the senior U.S. military officer in Iraq, convenes a battlefield conference in a Baghdad street. Maps are flapping in the rotor wash from the helicopter that has just set him down in Adhamiya--a place that...