Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 4

A Latino 'Spanking'; Bush's Party Lost Favor among Hispanics in 2006. Now the New Republican Chief Has to Woo Them Back
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With Daren Briscoe) Until recently, Jane Barbosa was as reliable a Republican as they come. A Mexican native who arrived in the United States at the age of 2, Barbosa, 60, first got involved in politics as a teenager,...
A Question of Freedom; When Benedict XVI Goes to Turkey, the Media Talk Will Be of Islam, but the Pope's Visit Could Advance Religious Liberty for Orthodox Christians
Byline: George Weigel (Weigel is senior fellow at Washington's Ethics and Public Policy Center and the author, most recently, of "God's Choice: Pope Benedict XVI and the Future of the Catholic Church.") Rome and Constantinople formally parted ways...
A Virulent Enemy; the Story of Yellow Fever Still Has Much to Teach Us
Byline: Anne Underwood It was nature's own bioterror attack. The year was 1898, during the Spanish-American War, and the United States was losing more soldiers to yellow fever than to combat. In the disease's final, hideous stages, patients turned...
Back Pain: To Cut or Not to Cut
Byline: Karen Springen Each year, about 300,000 Americans have surgery for herniated disks, at a cost of $10,000 to $15,000 per procedure. Is it worth it? Maybe. And maybe not. A report in last week's Journal of the American Medical Association...
Beliefwatch: Good Books
Byline: Lisa Miller Noah's Ark is the perfect children's tale. You have animals, a big boat, bad weather, a happy ending (good luck, though, answering the question: why did God kill all those people?). It's not difficult to find a charming, well-written,...
Defense: The Pentagon Handoff
***** CORRECTION: In "The Pentagon Handoff" (Periscope, Dec. 4), we misidentified Texas A&M University's executive vice president and provost. He is David B. Prior. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: John Barry and Gretel Kovach...
First Comes Junior in a Baby Carriage; Four in 10 Kids Are Now Born to Unmarried Moms
Byline: Debra Rosenberg and Pat Wingert (With Karen Springen and Daren Briscoe) Tara Rhodes always assumed her life would unfold in the usual order--she'd date her boyfriend, they'd get married and then have a kid or two. But then Rhodes, a legal...
Heartbreak's Revenge; Some States Allow Suits for 'Alienation of Affection.'
Byline: Julie Scelfo When George Berg's wife, Sandra, began spending three nights a week studying for an MBA, he didn't mind. But when the manager of the family's Myrtle Beach time share called two years ago to say someone left behind a Blockbuster...
Investigations: Putin, Russia and an Ex-Spy's Mysterious Death
Byline: Mark Hosenball, Michael Isikoff and Owen Matthews Until a few days ago, U.S. and British government inves-tigators had never heard of anyone being poisoned by the obscure and unstable isotope polonium-210. Now its extreme rarity is adding...
Let's Kill the Turkeys before They Can Fly
Byline: Allan Sloan Now that Thanksgiving has passed and we're stuffed with good cheer, it's time to start thinking about New Year's resolutions. Nowhere do we need resolve more than Washington. Given my contrarian nature, I'd like to suggest things...
Let's Talk about Race; in the Aftermath of Michael Richards's Meltdown at the Laugh Factory, It's Time to Tell the Truth about What's Too Scary to Say out Loud
Byline: Raina Kelley (With Joshua Alston) If you're just back from Thanksgiving in Antarctica, let me be the first to tell you that Michael Richards, the actor best known as Cosmo Kramer from "Seinfeld," let loose a racist tirade on a couple of...
Letters to the Magazine
Calling On the Former President's Men Some readers of our cover package expressed wary hope that Bush Senior and his team might help direct the country and rescue George W. Bush's presidency. "In the past, Bush 43 shunned his father's advice that might...
Making Your Grass Greener; Your Utility May Offer Free or Low-Cost Energy Audits That Can Help You Find Ways of Cutting Your Heating and Cooling Bills
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; Reporter associate: Temma Ehrenfeld Kermit the frog should love it. Everybody wants to be green. Now it's the real-estate industry, out to save energy, save the planet and save money for their clients. With only a little...
Moving into a New Office; What's in the Next Word, PowerPoint and Excel? A Radically Changed Look That Tries to Unleash Features
Byline: Steven Levy Julie Larson-Green had presented her work to Bill Gates earlier in her career, and like just about everyone in her shoes, had to manage some butterflies beforehand. But in January 2005, the stakes were higher. The 39-year-old...
Newsmakers: Matthew Broderick, Peter Jackson, Clay Aiken
Byline: Devin Gordon, Nicki Gostin Matthew Broderick: The stage and screen star has a new film called "Deck the Halls." He spoke with Nicki Gostin. I'm going to ask you something and you have to tell the truth. OK. How much do you hate...
New Speaker, Old Virtues
Byline: George F. Will There has been an admirable absence of chivalry in assessments of Nancy Pelosi's stumbling steps toward the speakership. She dismayed colleagues by saying that in order for her to be an effective leader she needed John Murtha...
One Brit vs. the Utopians; A Master Playwright Takes on Old Russia's Prerevolutionaries. Sound Dry? Just You Wait
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan He's back at last, that daredevil Brit--the guy who's so clever with quips but deep down is dead serious, who's as deft as an acrobat but tough enough to go the distance. No, no--not the new James Bond. We mean Stoppard....
Perspectives
"Our bellies are full of blood." Baghdad resident Imbrahim Tabour, responding to a barrage of insurgent attacks that killed more than 200 Iraqi civilians in one day "I never in a million years thought ... we'd be donning Leaf sweaters." Actor...
Politics: Out of the Running?
Byline: Michael Isikoff House speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi is exploring compromise candidates to resolve the furious lobbying fight over who should chair the House intelligence committee. Pelosi has agreed to meet this week with Rep. Alcee Hastings,...
Publishing: No More Free Rein for Regan
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts In Rupert Murdoch's global media empire, few hired hands have operated with the same level of autonomy as Judith Regan, the bad girl of publishing behind the O. J. Simpson "confession" book scandal. Apparently her freedom...
Scenes from a New Mall; Shoppers Can Now Find 'Downtown' in Suburbia
Byline: Jamie Reno Like so many suburbs, Lakewood, Colo., near Denver, never had a downtown. Now it does. Well, actually, what it has is Belmar, a shopping center--only this isn't your basic strip mall. It's what's called a "lifestyle center," an...
Sorry Isn't Just Another Word; I'm Not a Racist, That's What's So Insane about This, and Yet It's Said, It Comes through, It Fires out of Me. --Michael Richards
Byline: Ellis Cose Never apologize and never explain" may have been a fine creed for the cavalry officer played by John Wayne in "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon," released in 1949. But today, public figures reject such counsel out of hand. When caught...
'Stuff That Will Take Your Breath Away'; the Father of Inventions, Dean Kamen
Byline: Brad Stone It hasn't been a great year for Dean Kamen's personal transporter, the Segway. Earlier this year the company Ka-men founded recalled all 24,000 units it has sold in the United States, to repair a software glitch that can make...
Sword of the Shia; He Can Deal out Death through His Black-Clad Followers and Roil the Government Any Time He Chooses. Why Moqtada Al-Sadr May End Up Deciding America's Fate in Iraq
Byline: This story was written by Jeffrey Bartholet with reporting from Kevin Peraino and Sarah Childress in Baghdad; Michael Hastings in Amman; Dan Ephron, Michael Hirsh and John Barry in Washington; Christopher Dickey in Paris; Melinda Liu in Beijing;...
Technology: Are Hi-Def Discs for You?
Byline: Steven Levy In the next few weeks millions of people will buy TV sets with humongous high-definition screens. They will arrange with their cable and satellite providers to get HD television shows to fill all those pixels. And then they will...
The Coolest Mogul; Multimillionaire Business Exec Shawn Carter-Jay-Z to You-Is 36 and Still Hasn't Lost His Street Cred. How'd He Manage That?
Byline: Lorraine Ali No flashbulbs go off when Jay-Z enters the small downstairs lobby of Soho House, an exclusive hangout looking down on Manhattan's trendy meatpacking district. In fact, no one really even notices the 6-foot-2 guy in droopy jeans...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham There was a time, in the spring of 2003, when a relatively smooth transition from tyranny to democracy in Iraq did not seem an outlandish prospect. Baghdad had fallen; Saddam Hussein was on the run; soon the president of the...
The Elusive Hunter; It's a Way of Life That Dates to the Dawn of the Nation. but Hunting Is on the Wane in America. A Sportsman's Lament
Byline: Steve Tuttle I remember the first time i ever killed something. It was a rabbit, and I was about 12 years old. I put my gun to my shoulder and aimed--taking care to lead the target--and pulled the trigger. The animal seemed to tumble end...
The Last Man Standing; with the Neocons in Disarray, Elliott Abrams May Be Their Best Hope for Keeping President Bush Onboard
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Dan Ephron It's been a rough season for neoconservatives, the group that has dominated U.S. foreign policy since the attacks of September 11. They've been largely run out of the Bush administration, beset by infighting,...
The Maverick of Movieland; Robert Altman, 1925-2006
Byline: David Ansen Robert Altman never courted an audience's affections. A cool, iconoclastic customer, he scorned sentimentality, upended the rules of genre, spurned happy endings. Why, then, did his best movies produce in me a happiness unlike...
The Next Step? Think Vietnam. There Is Much Moaning in Washington about the Return of the 'Realists.' but What We Need Is a Kissingerian Effort to Extricate America
Byline: Fareed Zakaria If you want to understand the futility of america's current situation in Iraq, last week provided a vivid microcosm. On Thursday, just hours before a series of car bombs killed more than 200 people in the Shia stronghold of...
Thou Shalt Not Turn Me into a False Idol; Because I'm a Pastor's Wife, Everyone Thinks My Life Is Perfect and They Have Me Figured out. Not So Fast
Byline: Eileen Button (Button lives in Davison, Mich.) I married a banker. I like to remind my banker-turned-pastor husband of this when we're having a particularly difficult time in the ministry. Although I wouldn't trade his occupation--some would...