Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 26, June 30

America's Least 'Wanted'
Byline: David Ansen The trailers for the action movie "Wanted" promise some hot romantic sparks between stars Angelina Jolie and James McAvoy. "Is this when we start to bond?" asks McAvoy. "Would you like to?" Jolie purrs. Then there's a shot of...
Back on the Black Market
Byline: Mark Hosenball Tehran is pushing back against Bush administration efforts to crack down on Iranian agents who buy U.S. military equipment on the black market. In a development that angered and baffled American investigators, Hong Kong authorities...
Bucky's Very Large Dome
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Buckminster Fuller's inventions didn't always work, but his ideas still inspire. In the summer of 1948, the maverick inventor Buckminster Fuller was teaching at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, and his audacious...
Disconnect in the District
Byline: Evan Thomas Yes, we can? Your answer to this question may depend on just how far you are from northwest Washington. I went to a party two Sundays ago given by a friend, a well-known journalist, who is well connected in Washington and...
'He Should Never Have Gone to Iraq'
Byline: Dan Ephron; With Daniel Stone In Washington More borderline troops are being sent to the front, sometimes with tragic results. Pvt. David Dietrich had a history of cognitive problems. He struggled in boot camp at Fort Knox, Ky., striking...
Houston, We Have No Problems
Byline: Daniel Gross Houston has become a sort of Silicon Valley for the global energy industry. Urban cowboy? Think suburban geek. To find a hot spot where soaring oil and commodity prices, and the booming economies of the developing world,...
In Need of 'Wins on the Ground'
Byline: Lally Weymouth Jordan's King Abdullah warns that the clock is running out on the idea of a two-state solution. King Abdullah of Jordan sat down at Petra with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth last week and reflected on the state of affairs in...
In Search of Cindy McCain
Byline: Holly Bailey ***** Correction: In "In Search of Cindy McCain" we referred to her son Jack, who is at the U.S. Naval Academy, as a cadet. In fact, he is a midshipman. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** She may be the next First Lady....
Inside the Prison Escape
Byline: Sami Yousafzai This month's spectacular prison escape in Kandahar began with a jailed guerrilla's phone conversation with the No. 2 leader of the Afghan insurgency, according to one of the roughly 350 Taliban fighters who broke out. Speaking...
In the Driver's Seat
Byline: Richard M. Smith The CEO of Nissan and Renault on turnarounds. Ever since Lee Iacocca saved Chrysler from doom in the 1980s, CEOs who succeed in turnarounds are accustomed to some degree of adulation. But few become as celebrated as Carlos...
It's Not about the T Shirts
Byline: Matt Frei; Frei Is Chief Anchor Of "BBC World News America." Europeans should beware the perils of Obamamania. In Berlin his face stares out from T shirts and baseball caps. In Naples one enterprising restaurant has named a pizza after...
'Look, I Am My Husband's Best Friend'
Cindy McCain talks about long-distance marriage, dirty politics and calls from her son in Iraq. While her husband has been in Washington, Cindy McCain has been carving out a life of her own: last week she was in Vietnam to do charity work with Operation...
Making A Splash
Byline: Keith Naughton Speedo's new and controversial high-tech LZR suit is helping swimmers smash dozens of records. How the company plans to capitalize on Olympic gold. Michael Phelps steps onto the blocks of a large indoor pool in Omaha. He's...
McCain's Boeing Battle Boomerangs
Byline: Michael Isikoff One of John McCain's most celebrated achievements in recent years was his crusade to block a Pentagon contract with Boeing for a new fleet of midair refueling tankers. Incensed over what he denounced as a taxpayer "rip-off,"...
Microsoft after Gates. (and Bill after Microsoft.)
Byline: Steven Levy The icon of the tech world will focus on philanthropy as the company he founded faces turbulent seas. In some respects, this week won't be terribly different for bill Gates than the previous 1,712 weeks he has spent working...
Mr. Obama's Washington
Byline: Jonathan Darman; With Sarah Kliff He wants to change the culture there. But it's hard to fix a place you've never really known. Mr. Obama's Washington The life of a young senator in Washington can be lonely. After winning a Senate...
Perspectives
"I mean, 'whitey'? That's something that George Jefferson would say." Potential First Lady Michelle Obama, on unsubstantiated rumors circulating on the Web that she had once used the slur in a speech "The balance is zero." American Red Cross...
Reinventing the 'Fuzzbuster'
Byline: Daniel McGinn New GPS-powered features could help reposition a gizmo that has historically appealed to the young and the reckless. Like Dustin Hoffman's character in "Rain Man," I like to think that I'm an excellent driver--but that wasn't...
Return from Exile
Byline: Joshua Alston After 15 years, Liz Phair fights the ghosts of 'Guyville.' A reporter recently asked Liz Phair what it was like to be hated by everyone. "He said it just like that, totally matter of-fact," says Phair, still in disbelief....
Take A Three-Martini Nap
Byline: Tina Peng If Kristine Johnson gets fewer than seven hours of sleep at night, she barely makes it through the workday. So when that happens, Johnson, a 33-year-old San Francisco office manager, takes a nap. She's slept in a lawn chair on...
Telegram from A Parallel Universe
The newest Pulitzer Prize historian on America before the Civil War and the messages that can help make sense of the world we're in now For 10 years I immersed myself in writing a big book about the United States between 1815 and 1848. Now that...
The $10,000-A-Month Psychic
Byline: Tony Dokoupil When business people need a crystal ball, they turn to consultant Laura Day, the 'intuitionist.' When Seagate Technology, the $11 billion-a-year maker of hard drives for the Playstation 3 and Microsoft Xbox, went searching...
The Art of Chinese Cooking
Byline: Vanessa Hua; Hua Lives In Claremont, Calif. I can make a mean seafood paella, but I never learned to cook the food my grandmother made. I stood before the electric stove, poised to crack an egg on the side of a frying pan and into a mound...
The Best Brand? No Brand
Byline: Tony Dokoupil "I'm not much of a consumer." It's a refrain that New York Times columnist Rob Walker heard a lot while researching "Buying In," his fascinating new book about the dialogue between who we are and what we buy. His salient point:...
The Booze Is Back in Baghdad
Byline: Larry Kaplow; With Jessica Ramirez In Washington And Hussam Ali, Salih Mehdi And Yassar Ghani In Baghdad Slowly, in certain urban pockets, a more liberal, secular culture is returning to Iraq's streets. Elias Khalaf's cracked grin may...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham The roots of this week's cover can be traced back to Holly Bailey's observation that almost everything almost everybody seems to think about Cindy McCain is wrong. "Covering her husband's campaign, I've spent a lot of time observing...
The High Court: A User's Guide
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick The next president could appoint up to three justices--the constitutional equivalent of a straight flush. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court will hand down its final opinions for the term, and after that happens, nobody...
Vanessa's College Tour
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Nanessa Hudgens, star of Disney's "High School Musical," has a new CD called "Identified." She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Are you really on the set of "High School Musical 3"? I'm in San Francisco. Part of the movie is...
Vienna's Newest Boy Band
Byline: Lisa Miller Chant is popular among young people because 'there's a big harmony with those melodies.' The question comes off like an old "Monty Python" gag. What musical group in Britain is more popular than Paul Simon or the Ting Tings?...
We're Bossy-And Proud of It
Byline: Kathleen Deveny; With Karen Springen and Joan Raymond What is the difference between being bossy and being assertive? We ask girls to walk a very fine line. My daughter is a little bossy. It's not surprising, really, because I'm a little...
What Obama Should Say on Iraq
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Barack Obama needs to give a speech about Iraq. Otherwise he will find himself in the unusual position of having being prescient about the war in 2002 and yet being overtaken by events in 2008. The most important reason to...
When Inflation Means Starvation
Food prices have surged for many reasons. But giving timely assistance to ward off further suffering among the world's poor has become a moral obligation. Inflation is a cruel tax. It places a very heavy burden on the poorest countries. And when...