Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 02, January 12

A Hip-Hop Survival Tip
Byline: Seth Colter Walls If you want rap music with a shelf life longer than milk, take a listen to Q-Tip's 'The Renaissance.' Real art guards its stature carefully. New styles and schools and stars can spend years in the woodshed, working to...
Almost Killing Hitler
Byline: George F. Will The July 20, 1944, attempt was one of perhaps 15 by the German Resistance, which was neither negligible nor contemptible. Impressed by a written report from a colonel, Adolf Hitler exclaimed, "Finally a general staff officer...
An Inexact Analogy
Byline: Jonathan Darman The left can breathe easy. Rick Warren is not Obama's Billy Graham. The furor over Rick Warren is not about Inauguration Day but what comes after. When Barack Obama announced last month that Warren, the pastor of Saddleback...
A Plan of Attack for Peace
Byline: Daniel Klaidman; With Dan Ephron, Christopher Dickey and Michael Hirsh With Gaza in flames, the prospects for a Middle East deal seem minuscule. But there is a way out, and both sides know what they must do. In the remorseless logic of...
A U.S. Office in Iran? Not Yet
Byline: Mark Hosenball Score one last win for the Bush hard-liners: the White House appears to have nixed a plan to open a diplomatic office in Iran. Factions within the administration had been debating the proposal for two years, and just before...
Don't Ask Too Fast
Byline: Dan Ephron On gays, Obama's Joint Chiefs chair is caught between his boss and a conservative military. Admiral Mike Mullen likes to talk to the enlisted troops. On a recent tour of Iraq and Afghanistan, he gathers them around at each...
Don't Muffle the Call to Serve
Byline: Jonathan Alter From FDR to Bill Clinton's AmeriCorps, leadership in service has always come from the president. The day before the inauguration is the Martin Luther King holiday, and the president-elect wants it to be devoted to service....
Give Us a Sonnet, Doggonit
Byline: Samantha Henig In many ways, it is an unenviable task: write a poem grand enough for a presidential inauguration but accessible enough for the wide swath of Americans tuning in--and artful enough to keep critics at bay. Only three poets...
If Obama Is Serious
Jews worry for a living; their tragic history compels them to do so. In the next few years, there will be plenty to worry about, particularly when it comes to Israel. The current operation in Gaza won't do much to ease these worries or to address Israel's...
'It Is Never over, Never Escaped'
Byline: Aarti Tikoo Singh; Singh lives in Queens, N.Y. For years, only news from Kashmir could stir my nightmares of childhood terror. Then came Mumbai. I am 11 years old. I am panting as I run alongside my parents through the dark, narrow, deserted...
It's Survival of the Weak and Scrawny
Byline: Lily Huang Researchers see 'evolution in reverse' as hunters kill off prized animals with the biggest antlers and pelts. Some of the most iconic photographs of Teddy Roosevelt, one of the first conservationists in American politics, show...
Jailed for 23 Years, an Old Spy Asks for a Fresh Start
Byline: Dan Ephron In a spectacular case of criminally divided loyalties, Jonathan Jay Pollard, a former U.S. naval intelligence analyst, was sentenced to life in prison 23 years ago for selling to Israel some of America's most guarded secrets....
Made Money with Madoff? Don't Count on Keeping It
Byline: Mark Hosenball The lucky folks who cashed in and got out before Bernard Madoff's $50 billion investment empire came crashing down might not be as lucky as they think. Sources close to the Madoff case say that a recent court ruling in a similar...
Membership Has Its Penalties
Byline: Daniel Gross Among the city's elite, investing in Bernard Madoff's too-good-to-be-true fund became a status symbol--a costly one. Palm Beach is ground zero of the Madoff affair. The posh sliver of land is home to a high concentration...
On Second Thought
Byline: Sharon Begley Scientists are supposed to change their minds when evidence undercuts their views. Dream on. When politicians do it, they're tarred as flip-floppers. When lovers do it, we complain they're fickle. But scientists are supposed...
Perspectives
"I consider myself a casualty, one of the many casualties of the war on terror." Former attorney general Alberto Gonzales, announcing that he is writing a memoir about his tenure in the Bush administration "We used to fight about who gets to...
Remains of the Day
Byline: Eve Conant; With Rana Fil in Lebanon Nineteen hijackers died on 9/11. What should be done with what's left of them? In the grim, sleepless months of excavation after the September 11 attacks, forensic pathologists in New York City worked...
Sam Huntington, 1927-2008
Byline: Fareed Zakaria With ideology disappearing as a source of identity, he saw religion moving to the fore. If there is one central, recurring mistake the United States makes when dealing with the rest of the world, it is to assume that creating...
The Case for Walking Away
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld Normally I'd say suck it up, cut spending and repay your debt. But not if you're going broke. In January, we're supposed to sit down and organize our personal finances. This year...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham He still remembers the chocolates. As a former Jerusalem bureau chief, Dan Klaidman, who is now the magazine's managing editor, is particularly well qualified to write this week's cover on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict over...
The Last Day of the Iraq War
Byline: Larry Kaplow; With Salih Mehdi, Ahmed Obeidi and Saad Al-Izzi in Mahmudiyah and Baghdad It's too late to fix Iraq before the pullout date. All U.S. troops can do now is keep trying to slow the killing and get out. They call it 'Iraqi good...
Too Much of a Bad Thing
Byline: Joshua Alston No one on TV can be merely good or evil anymore. That's why we're suffering from Antihero Overload. In a recent episode of "The Office," clueless boss Michael Scott (Steve Carell) decides to dispatch his workplace nemesis...
What's Race Got to Do with It?
Byline: Jerry Adler Nine clinical trials around the world are studying treatments in groups defined by race, gender or both. It is the question that almost never gets raised in polite company, although almost everyone has an opinion about it....
When Bling Was Still King
Byline: Allison Samuels 'Notorious' revisits Biggie, and rap, in their primes. Though there was little surprise by the end--how could there be?--"Notorious,'' a movie about the life and death of rapper Christopher Wallace (a.k.a. The Notorious...