Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 06, February 9

Always on My Mind
Byline: Suzanne Smalley David Kennedy's obsession with drug dealers has made him a highly sought-after criminologist. The image of a drug dealer driving a Mercedes is a Hollywood favorite, so maybe it's not surprising that the African-American...
An Opening Move: Swap Prisoners?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Speaking to reporters, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton last week invited Iran to show its willingness "to engage meaningfully" with the international community--language that seemed to signal the Obama administration was...
A 'Slumdog' in Heat
Byline: Fareed Zakaria 'Slumdog Millionaire' is being called this year's feel-good movie. So why are Indians so angry about it? Produced with a budget of only $15 million, "Slumdog Millionaire" is this year's Hollywood rags-to-riches story--in...
A Turnaround Strategy
Byline: Fareed Zakaria We're better at creating enemies in Afghanistan than friends. Here's how to fix that--and the war, too. In May 2006 a unit of American soldiers in Afghanistan's Uruzgan valley were engulfed in a ferocious fire fight with...
Authentic Americana
Byline: Andrew Romano Why Grandpa's clothes are suddenly chic. Fok-Yan Leung doesn't look out of place at the local field-and-stream emporium. His Maine Guide Jacket is nearly indistinguishable from the coats his fellow Moscow, Idaho, residents...
A Vast and Sudden Sadness
Byline: Claudia Kalb; With Andy Murr Each year thousands of families experience stillbirth. As science seeks causes, parents use photography to honor their babies and cope with their grief. Marirosa Anderson was still sweating from a workout...
Conjunction Dysfunction
Byline: Jennie Yabroff At last, a school film without a Hollywood ending. Soulemayne has a stunning smile. He also has an explosive temper and a tattoo he claims is a passage from the Qur'an that translates as, IF YOUR WORDS ARE LESS IMPORTANT...
Dare I Trust My Intuition?
Byline: Mary Carmichael Recently, a friend sent me a 2006 clip from "The Oprah Winfrey Show" featuring a room of fussy newborns and a woman who claimed she could translate their cries. I'm a skeptic by nature, but around March 4, I will have a newborn...
Fear and Loathing in Davos
Byline: Daniel Gross Many CEOs, having endured flying commercial for the first time in years, were treated to an avalanche of doom. CNBC's James Cramer likes to say that there's always a bull market somewhere. When one sector or region is down,...
Imagining Life without Lawyers
In many cases, fear of liability can impede good judgment. But the cure for too much law shouldn't be too little. So what are we to do about all these lawyers? Philip K. Howard, founder of Common Good and author of "The Death of CommonSense," is...
Less Shouting, More Talking
Byline: Richard Mouw; Mouw is the president of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. Yes, I voted for Prop 8. Yes, I oppose gay marriage. But that doesn't make me a religious fundamentalist. On the morning of Nov. 4, I saw an angry...
Managing along the Cutting Edge
Byline: Daniel McGinn Think smaller: Most CEOs have strategies for good times. This recession will require a new set of skills. They carry briefcases, not resuscitation equipment. But if a consulting team from AlixPartners suddenly shows up at...
Mohamed ElBaradei
Also in Davos, Mohamed ElBaradei, the controversial director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), sat down with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth to defend his record. Several Bush administration officials as well as some nonproliferation experts...
Obama's Vietnam
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas; With Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai The analogy isn't exact. But the war in Afghanistan is starting to look disturbingly familiar. About a year ago, Charlie Rose, the nighttime talk-show host, was interviewing...
Of Voodoo and the Brain
Byline: Sharon Begley Patterns of neural activity and thoughts or feelings are not as tightly linked as scientists have claimed. It is a brave, or perhaps foolhardy, scientist who uses the term "voodoo" to describe results in a high-profile field...
Perspectives
"Change has come to Washington, and I hope Karl Rove is ready for it." Michigan Rep. John Conyers, pressing Rove to testify before the House regarding allegations of politically motivated U.S. attorney firings in 2006. Rove once again invoked "executive...
Predators on the Hunt in Pakistan
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Mark Hosenball; With Michael Hirsh, Ron Moreau and John Barry A barrage of pinpoint strikes may be unsettling Al Qaeda. After one of the latest U.S. Predator attacks in North Waziristan, a Taliban subcommander visited...
Problems in Paris, Texas
Byline: Gretel C. Kovach and Arian Campo-Flores A brutal death has caused long-simmering racial tensions to flare anew. To his loved ones in Paris, Texas, Brandon McClelland was affectionately known as "Big Boy," a 284-pound gentle giant. He...
Stimulating Times
Byline: George F. Will Cows should die in Wisconsin so that mothers in Watts will pay more--a price government deems 'reasonable'--for their children's milk? During World War II, Oscar Levant, the pianist and wit, was asked by his draft board,...
Survival Tips from the Top
The playbook: Our roundtable of corporate experts explains how to thrive during the downturn. A Perfect Time to Invest Craig Barrett, Recently retired chief executive officer of Intel There is a general rule in business life: market share...
The Alchemist of the Mundane
Byline: Claire Messud John Updike was a man of his time: daring, controversial, prolific and profound. Very few--indeed, few writers--have so incisive an awareness, so frank and unsparing an eye, as did John Updike, who died of lung cancer on...
The Blue and the Great
Byline: Malcolm Jones Fifty years ago, Miles Davis recorded 'Kind of Blue.' If you own one jazz album, this is probably the one. At 2:30 on March 2, 1959, the 32-year-old trumpet player and bandleader Miles Davis took six sidemen into a New York...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Not so long ago, everybody, it seemed, believed in the Afghan war. Put in 20th-century terms, Afghanistan was World War II (the Good War) while Iraq was Vietnam (the quagmire). During the campaign, there was hawkish talk of dispatching...
The Pope's Denial Problem
By reconciling with extremist bishops, Benedict embraces the far-right fringe. Ever since Pope John XXIII made history by the reforms of the Second Vatican Council, there have been believing Roman Catholics who regarded the whole thing as having...
The Spy and the Sex Scandal
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff He seemed just the sort of spy the CIA is looking for to fight the war on terror. Andrew Warren is a 6-foot-4 African-American schooled in the martial arts. Steeped in Middle Eastern history, he is a convert...
The Spymaster of New York
Byline: Christopher Dickey David Cohen and the NYPD are pioneering a new way of fighting terrorism. In sweltering Mumbai last November, two days after the terrorist rampage that killed or wounded more than 500 people, some odd figures joined...
The Stimulus That Didn't Stir
Byline: Jonathan Alter A depression that didn't happen (if it doesn't) will likely be pocketed more than credited. President Obama says the $18.4 billion in bonuses paid to those financial wizards who drove the economy off a cliff is "the height...