Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 16, April 19

100 Places to Remember before They Disappear
Some of the most beautiful locales on earth could change radically--or vanish altogether--if climatologists' predictions prove correct. This sampling from a Newsweek special issue (on newsstands now) reminds us what's at stake--not just for the people,...
A Coup and a Close Call in Kyrgyzstan
Byline: Owen Matthews The violence that gripped Bishkek, the Kyrgyz capital, last week quickly turned into a dictator's worst nightmare when the snowballing riots forced President Kurmanbek Bakiyev to flee for his life. But by week's end most pundits...
Beyond the Bad Boys
Byline: Julia Baird A quiet revolution in male behavior. infidelity is one thing between a man and his maker, declared the English author Samuel Johnson, but between a man and his wife it means nothing: "Wise married women don't trouble themselves...
Bring in the Big Guns
Byline: Jonathan Alter Obama prioritizes nonproliferation. An enduring mystery of modern global politics is why the biggest threat to security--the one most likely to kill hundreds of thousands or millions of people--has been such an afterthought....
Contempt for Karzai
Byline: Michael Isikoff, Ron Moreau, and Sami Yousafzai Last fall President Obama made what may be his most agonizing decision yet, sending 30,000 more U.S. troops to Afghanistan. But now White House officials are making little secret about how...
Follow the Money
Byline: Howard Fineman The sad, sordid way we pay for campaigns. I'm a little shaky on the social geography of WeHo (a.k.a. West Hollywood), so I called friends in the entertainment business to get a fix on the Voyeur club. You know the place:...
Hate
Byline: Evan Thomas and Eve Conant Antigovernment extremists are on the rise--and on the march. Stewart Rhodes does not seem like an extremist. He is a graduate of Yale Law School and a former U.S. Army paratrooper and congressional staffer....
He Ate, She Ate
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Women connect food to their hearts. For men, it's a different organ. Kate Moses grew up with a glamorous, self-dramatizing mother who instructed her children to refer to her as the babysitter. Starved for maternal affection,...
How to Be Invisible
The joy of travel is to let different cultures seep into your identity. It's not to bring your own culture with you so you can inflict it on the native populace. Recently, while circling the earth for a travel book, I experienced one of my greatest...
'I Do Pack, and I Will Not Blink'
Byline: Jon Meacham The country is in a bad place at the moment. As Evan Thomas and Eve Conant report this week, we are seeing a disturbing number of threats against lawmakers, a grim manifestation of the inchoate political and cultural anger on...
No Wonder They Called Her Grace
Byline: Sarah Ball A museum show of Grace Kelly's wardrobe puts her style in its place. Guarded with the same ferocity as "plans for a fifteen-hundred-mile ballistic missile," the design called for white, poured like a healthy slug of milk into...
Short-Circuiting Malaria
Byline: Daniel Lyons The Silicon Valley startup Intellectual Ventures is using computers to eradicate malaria--one mosquito at a time. Plus: eight more cutting-edge companies to watch. Philip Eckhoff and Karima Nigmatulina don't need to be working...
Stevens's Real Legacy
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why the E word matters. Just around this time last year, Justice David Souter announced his resignation from the U.S. Supreme Court and President Obama explained to the White House press corps that he was looking for a...
The Comeback Country
Byline: Daniel Gross How America pulled itself back from the brink--and why it's destined to stay on top. In the wake of the 2008 financial meltdown and the deep, long recession that followed, the decline of America has become the preferred intellectual...
The Jennifer Syndrome
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Two stars, one first name. How Aniston and Lopez lost the fame game. Pop quiz: Bennifer. Raise your hand if you still remember what that means. Before there was Brangelina or TomKat, there was Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck,...
'The Language God Talks': Raising Caine
Byline: Louisa Thomas Herman Wouk's legacy was assured with 'The Caine Mutiny.' Yet he's still writing, 60 years later. The Library of Congress's Center for the Book once hosted a conference commemorating the work of Herman Wouk. The occasion...
The Shape of Things to Come
Four leading economists predict the trajectory of the recovery. Nouriel Roubini Professor at New York University and chairman of Roubini Global Economics We expect a decade of growth at or below potential. Policy responses to this crisis have...
The Stevens Court
Byline: Evan Thomas and Stuart Taylor Jr. John Paul Stevens went from judicial conservative to liberal light, but the court he served for 35 years stayed mostly in the middle. The 35-year career of justice John Paul Stevens, who announced last...
This Nuclear Option Is Nuclear
Byline: George F. Will The costs of fads and superstition. The 25 people killed last week in the West Virginia coal-mine explosion will soon be as forgotten by the nation as are the 362 miners who were killed in a 1907 explosion in that state,...
What Will Betty Crocker Look like at 100?
Byline: Number 17, NYC and Matthew Philips Even the oldest, best-known consumer brands like to keep things fresh, which is why some of today's most familiar logos look so different from their humble beginnings. As companies adapt to changing...
William Johnson: 'You Have to Take a Risk
Byline: Richard M. Smith The CEO of H.J. Heinz on leadership and a bruising proxy fight. On paper, William Johnson had the perfect background to run H.J. Heinz, the $10 billion food company. He'd worked as a marketer in the company's flagship...