Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 15, October 11

A Los Angeles Rises in Western China
Byline: Isaac Stone Fish The dusty silk road oasis of Kashgar sits at the precipice of empire. China's western-most city, bordering the remotest parts of Afghanistan and Pakistan, has long been poor: average income hovered at about $1,000 a year...
Android Invasion
Byline: Daniel Lyons How a tiny piece of software created by a few Google engineers is ushering in the mobile revolution and reshaping the fortunes of the world's biggest tech companies. Nobody ever imagined how quickly the Android mobile-phone...
Break the Banks
Byline: Charles Ferguson I dreamed of being a trial lawyer, a character from the courtroom dramas I devoured as a boy in San Francisco. I attended trials, persuading my father to take me to the city's superior courthouse, known grandly as the Hall...
Dare to Care
Byline: Lisa Miller A minister and the politics of poverty. In a political season, it's easy for a journalist to be cynical--until David Beckmann walks into your office. Beckmann, in his blue blazer, looks like any Washington lobbyist, down to...
From 2010 to 2012
Byline: Andrew Romano When GOP presidential hopefuls say they're focused on helping the party win as many seats as possible in upcoming midterm elections, they're not lying, per se. They're just not telling the whole truth. In reality, the bigger...
From Lockers to Lockup
Byline: Jessica Bennett; Follow the author on twitter (twitter.com/jess7bennett) School bullying in the digital age can have tragic consequences. But should it be a crime? It started with rumors, a love triangle, and a dirty look in a high-school...
Good Business
Byline: Joel Schectman Is it possible to do good and do well? Businesspeople with a goal to better society--known as social entrepreneurs--think so. Unlike traditional nonprofits, these do-gooder companies turn a buck while pushing for environmental...
Hiding Behind the Web
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Like a journalistic Zorro, a Mexican blogger works where reporters fear to tread. Is he doing a public service, or is he just a tool of the cartels? After all the bloody mayhem that had taken place, the July 17 edition...
If You Build It --
Byline: Ezra Klein Now's the time to invest in infrastructure. People say the government should be run more like a business. So imagine yourself as CEO. Your bridges are crumbling. Your air-traffic control system doesn't use GPS. The Society...
I'm Mad as Hell? .?.?. and I'm Going to Vote!
Byline: Sharon Begley The psychology of an angry electorate. Given that the tea party movement was launched with a furious on-air outburst by CNBC's Rick Santelli in February 2009, when he called for a "Chicago Tea Party" to protest the White...
More 'Jihadistans'?
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau Taliban sources in Afghanistan say jihadist allies from Central Asia have started heading home. Though the exodus is being encouraged by relentless American drone attacks against the fighters' back bases in...
Red Menace
Byline: Joshua Kurlantzick Why Beijing has turned so pushy. For months, the rest of Asia has watched China with rising alarm. It goes far beyond the recent standoff in which Beijing forced Tokyo to release a Chinese ship captain who had been...
Remaking Martha
Byline: Raina Kelley The domestic doyenne is hoping to sell you a new set of kitchen cabinets and a bucket of paint. At a time when housekeeping seemed like retrograde drudgery, Martha Stewart built a media empire based on an idea of domestic...
The Anti-Rahm
Byline: Jonathan Alter What Rouse brings to the top job. On the day Barack Obama took the oath of office, Pete Rouse, already his most unassuming adviser, turned down a prime seat on the inaugural platform to watch the historic event on TV. On...
The Bright Nowhere
Byline: Louisa Thomas Death has long been fodder for Seamus Heaney's poems. This time, it's personal. As a famous poet, Seamus Heaney is often considered in isolation, but Heaney himself has always focused on what links people, generations, and...
The Real Jobs Machine
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Without startups, we're sunk. If you're interested in job creation--and who isn't these days?--you should talk to someone like Morris Panner. In 1999, Panner and some others started a Boston software company called...
The True Cost of Money
Byline: Peter Tasker Why countries are trying to manipulate their currencies. The Japanese are doing it again. The South Koreans prefer to do it when nobody's watching. The Chinese are at it brazenly and on an enormous scale. The Swiss tried...
Turn on the Red Light
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Sami Yousafzai Muslim-bashing politicians may be getting votes, but they're raising the threat to Europe. The most popular film in France for the past three weeks has been Of Gods and Men. It's based on the true...
Twilight of the Snobs
Byline: Seth Colter Walls You know the score on Wagner--he's long-winded and punishing, strictly for the devotees. But a new production coming to a theater near you wants non-superfans to pay attention. There is little about Richard Wagner's...