Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 157, No. 08, February 21

A Tale of Two Bad Laws
Byline: George F. Will 'Obamacare' collides with Ohio's regulation of the truth. No person, during the course of any campaign--shall--make a false statement concerning the voting record of a candidate or public official. --An Ohio law the...
Fashion's Surprising New Face
Byline: Robin Givhan Michelle Obama's glamour has democratized fashion and given rise to an unlikely star. Bonnie Morrison is a celebrated social schmoozer. She can shift from an entertaining riff on the merits of The Real Housewives to an astute...
Inside the Killing Machine
Byline: Tara Mckelvey President Obama is ordering a record number of Predator strikes. An exclusive interview with a man who approved 'lethal operations.' It was an ordinary-looking room located in an office building in northern Virginia. The...
Is Alex Trebek in Jeopardy?
Byline: Daniel Stone A computer invades the venerable quiz show. Alex Trebek bounds across the blue-toned stage, past the giant board of clues, eager to take questions from the studio audience. It's somewhere around the 6,000th episode of Jeopardy!...
Japan's Big Bad Boys
Byline: Takashi Yokota In Japan, sumo wrestlers are supposed to be the (ample) embodiment of classical virtues such as discipline and honor. But these days the sport is governed by a dysfunctional, hidebound organization and constantly mired in...
Kitchen Influential
Byline: Katrina Heron Tech tycoon Nathan Myhrvold serves up the ultimate cookbook, a 2,438-page manifesto on the art and science of what we eat. For a wunderkind who began his career as a research assistant to Stephen Hawking, went on to become...
P. J. Harvey Is Keeping Her Shirt On
Byline: Seth Colter Walls The first-person characters in P. J. Harvey's early songs never thought twice about oversharing. "I wanna bathe in milk, eat grapes," she declared in the fuzzed-out opening of 1993's "Reeling," before howling: "Robert De...
The Facebook Freedom Fighter
Byline: Mike Giglio Wael Ghonim's day job was at Google. But at night he was organizing a revolution. The telephone call from Cairo came late on Thursday, Jan. 27. "I think they're following me," the caller told the friend on the other end. "I'm...
The Last Company Town
Byline: Tony Dokoupil There was a time when employers provided everything: houses, hospitals, bars. Such a place still exists--but not for long. Welcome to Scotia, Calif. When the Pacific Lumber Co. started logging in 1863, there were few towns...
The Siren of the Financial Meltdown
Byline: Mary Ann Sieghart Brainy, beautiful economist Dambisa Moyo castigates the West for its economic profligacy in a provocative new book. She talks with NEWSWEEK about rising from Zambian roots to the heights of Davos. When Dambisa Moyo wrote...
The Tragedy of Mubarak
Byline: Christopher Dickey The Egyptian president had ruled for decades. Then his grandson died, and the unraveling began. The night before he finally stepped down as Egypt's president, the protesters in Tahrir Square heard Hosni Mubarak deliver...
Wanted: A Grand Strategy for America
Byline: Niall Ferguson NEWSWEEK's new columnist on Obama's Egypt debacle and the vacuum it exposes. "The statesman can only wait and listen until he hears the footsteps of God resounding through events; then he must jump up and grasp the hem...
Who's Eating Your Lunch?
Byline: Lauren Streib AOL has been forced to become a content company and team up with Huffington Post now that we all get our Internet from the cable guy. Meanwhile, MySpace is sporting a FOR SALE sign and Borders is facing Chapter 11, while their...