Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 159, No. 21, May 21

A Mighty Wind
Byline: Trevor Butterworth Did Flatulent dinosaurs really cause climate change? A strong wind is blowing across the field of paleontology, and it stinks. According to a short paper by three British academics, sauropods--veggie-munching dinosaurs...
Apartment Therapy
Byline: Rebecca Dana 'Wellness real estate' for the green 1 percent. Terry McAuliffe, Deepak Chopra, Dick Gephardt, Dr. Oz, and a team of scientists from Columbia University walk into a luxury Manhattan apartment building.?.?. Sounds like...
Barack Obama's Gay Marriage Evolution
Byline: Andrew Sullivan The President of the United States shifted the mainstream in one interview. It was the spring of 2007, back when Barack Obama's bid for the presidency seemed quixotic at best. I'd seen Obama speak to a crowd and was impressed...
Blame the Right
Byline: Paul Begala The GOP puts party before country every time. As the poet predicted, the center cannot hold. But it's not because both the right and left are tearing at it equally. In an age in which journalism and punditry are terrorized...
Captains Courageous
Byline: Tina Brown We the people want our leaders to lead. I'm Told that Obama seemed "almost giddy" after coming out with his milestone pronouncement in favor of gay marriage. The sheer relief of not being suffocated by hairsplitting political...
Coming (Eventually) to America
Byline: Josh Dzieza Why The Avengers debuted overseas. Bad news, American superfans: you're late to the party, and you probably will be from now on. Even if you lined up for a midnight screening of The Avengers, you were behind fans in France,...
Hemingway's Fiery Rival
Byline: Alexandra Fuller War reporter Martha Gellhorn finally gets her due. Ernest Hemingway endures: his inimitable writing; his dramatic death by self-inflicted gunshot at the relatively young age of 61; his big-game hunting, hard-drinking,...
Innumerate Indians, Irreverent Thais
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Dissident U Is there a bidding war on for Chen Guangcheng? The blind dissident lawyer, whose Houdini-like escape from his boorish incarceration in rural China sparked an almighty Sino-U.S. kerfuffle, has been offered...
My Favorite Mistake: Eli Broad
On his billion-dollar cable screw-up. You always learn lessons in business. Fortunately, I haven't made too many mistakes in life, but this was the biggest one measured in dollars. Back in 1966, Kaufman and Broad Corp., which I founded in 1957...
My Warrior Women
Ridley Scott on directing kick-ass leading ladies. the lead in my new film Prometheus was always going to be female, like Sigourney Weaver in the original Alien. Then I came across Noomi Rapace when I was watching The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo...
Risky Business
Byline: Zachary Karabell The $2 Billion Lesson Of Jpmorgan Chase. Question: When does risk aversion become risky behavior? Answer: when you are a large financial institution in today's world, especially a behemoth bank like JPMorgan Chase, attempting...
She Knows How to Beat Obama
Byline: Andrew Romano Why the country's first Latina governor might be Mitt's best veep pick. Unless you happen to live near vast stretches of sand, sagebrush, and adobe, chances are you have no idea who Susana Martinez is. That's a pity, because...
Spider-Man 2.0
Byline: Marlow Stern Rebranding the webslinger for 2012. What compelled you to sign on to this Spider-Man franchise reboot? Director Marc Webb: When they brought it to me, the 17-year-old kid in myself was excited. I was hesitant at first,...
Tammy Duckworth
Byline: Michelle Goldberg An Iraq War vet takes on the Tea Party. After Tammy Duckworth lost her 2006 run for Congress by 2 percentage points in one of the country's most expensive House races, she swore she'd never run again. One of the few...
The Body Bomb
Byline: Daniel Klaidman And Christopher Dickey Forget underpants. Al Qaeda's diabolical new plan. after the explosion, as the air cleared in a Saudi villa, the grotesque remains of the suicide bomber littered the room. His mission on that night...
The Dictator's Demands
Byline: Admiral General Aladeen What Sacha Baron Cohen's alter ego watches. Jachnoon! Death to the West everyone! Newsweek asked me, Admiral General Aladeen, to make a list of my all-time-favorite movies. I fell in love with movies when I...
The European Farce
Byline: Niall Ferguson Will the continent act to avert an economic cataclysm? With the sap rising and the governments falling, all the European powers are merrily acting in national character. In the midst of a severe financial crisis, the...
The Sorrow beneath the Sea
Byline: Callum Roberts Imagine an underwater world without whales, sharks, and dolphins, where jellyfish and algae rule. It's already happening. Like children the world over, my daughters love turtles. At once incongruous and graceful, they connect...
The Speculator
Byline: Nick Summers Ted Sarandos is placing the future of Netflix on a single high-stakes bet: original programming. A man waving around money in Hollywood does not want long for attention: usually the talent comes to him. One Saturday morning...
Yahoo's Frontal Loeb
Byline: Rob Cox Hell hath no fury like a hedgie scorned. When the clouds descended on the slopes at Davos one Saturday in January, Dan Loeb called it quits and headed for the gym. The poor visibility, the hedge-fund manager told me, wasn't letting...