Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 19, November 5

A Downward Spiral
Byline: Suzanne Smalley And Arian Campo-Flores; With Frederick Burger After his arrest on a drug charge, the 'Preppy Killer' could be headed back to jail for the rest of his life. The neighbors always suspected that something shady was taking...
A Mission of Her Own
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Gynecologist Hilda Hutcherson is fighting to help women combat the constant pressure to be perfect. In 20 years as an obstetrician and gynecologist, Dr. Hilda Hutcherson has helped poor women and very wealthy women....
A 'Modern' Boss Rises in Beijing
Byline: Melinda Liu and Jonathan Ansfield Henry Paulson, U.S. Treasury secretary, once called Xi Jinping "the kind of guy who gets things over the goal line." This month Xi scored the goal of his career. He has emerged as the favorite to become...
A New Intelligence Failure?
Byline: Mark Hosenball The Syrian Desert facility that Israel apparently attacked in a shadowy Sept. 6 raid -- and that some administration officials believe was a secret nuclear reactor -- might be several years old. Israel bombed the complex near...
Another Turn of the Screw
Washington levies drastic new sanctions on Tehran. Is the diplomacy dead? One of the most severe sanctions packages in U.S. history was ready six weeks ago. But never before had Washington branded virtually the entire military of another country...
A River Runs through It
Byline: Larry McMurtry The Rio Grande has long inspired the best -- and darkest -- of stories. The author of 'Lonesome Dove' explores a new film chapter: 'No Country for Old Men.' If we allow that Cervantes kicked off the novel with "Don Quixote"...
Art with A Real Bite
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Damien Hirst's shark arrives in New York. The title card for the new installation of the Damien Hirst piece at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York lists the materials as "glass, steel, formaldehyde, shark," a deceptively...
A Terrorist Walks Free
Byline: Michael Isikoff Cole bomber Jamal al-Badawi already escaped from jail once. This time the government opened the door. One of the first big breakthroughs in the U.S. government's war against Al Qaeda came in January 2001, when a grimly...
Babs's Stepson Also Rises
Byline: Marc Peyser You might call Josh Brolin the Rory Culkin (or Stephen Baldwin or Lorna Luft) of the moment. He's one of those actors who are better known for their bloodlines -- dad James Brolin, wife Diane Lane, stepmother Barbra Streisand...
Bringing TV to Your Handheld
Byline: Cathy Lu Thanks to a new wave of handheld, video-friendly devices, it's never been easier to keep yourself (or the kids) entertained. But before you buy a portable boob tube, there are a few things to consider. If you plan to eye lots...
Combat's Inner Cost
Byline: Gretel C. Kovach The Army has no other facility like it anywhere on earth. The Restoration and Resilience Center, opened in July at Fort Bliss, Texas, is the laboratory for WARP -- the Army's experimental Warrior Resilience Program. "This...
Cool It with the Lights
Byline: Karen Springen This year, Americans will send nearly 2 billion holiday cards, use more than 38,000 miles of ribbon and leave millions of Christmas trees on the curb. Does that mean you should feel guilty for having a great time? Nah. Neither...
Dear John: We Beg You, Make It Stop
Byline: Keith Naughton Our country is growing weary of "Our Country." The Chevy truck commercials featuring John Mellencamp's melancholy anthem have become so ubiquitous that they're driving sports fans to distraction. ESPN columnist Bill Simmons...
Fear and Allergies in the Lunchroom
Byline: Claudia Kalb; With Karen Springen, Joan Raymond In Shaker Heights And Mary Carmichael It's 1 p.m. at Mercer Elementary School in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and Lena Paskewitz's kindergarten class is filled with the happy hum of kids getting ready...
Ignore the Noose Makers
Byline: Ellis Cose Because of lynching's violent, racist history, the mere invocation of it can make people insanely angry. IN AN AGE WHEN LYNCHING IS NO LONGER ACCEPTED, WHAT IS THE MEANING of a noose? When a twisted rope, evocative of such...
Is Age Just a Number?
Byline: Jessica Bennett ***** Correction: In "Is Age Just a Number?" (Periscope, Nov. 5), we said that MySpace cofounder Tom Anderson would turn 38 on Nov. 8. Born in 1970, Anderson, in fact, just turned 37. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. *****...
'It's Not a Silver Bullet'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria A prominent plant biologist says that biofuels are only one part of a green energy solution. Much hope for an affordable clean-energy solution has been placed on the potential of biofuels like ethanol. Stanford University's...
It's Not Easy Being Green
Byline: Karen Breslau Does your vinyl shower curtain contribute to global warming? Will using a plastic razor doom the polar bears? How many bike trips does it take to offset your environmental sins? For well-meaning but utterly confused consumers,...
Knocking Yourself Up
Byline: Lorraine Ali ***** In "Knocking Yourself Up" (Nov. 5), we referred to the Fathers & Family Web site. The correct name is Fathers & Families. NEWSWEEK regrets the errors. ***** Some women laugh about turkey basters replacing...
Mariska, off the Cuff
Byline: Nicki Gostin Mariska Hargitay is back for her ninth season as Detective Olivia Benson, one of the toughest women on primetime, in "Law and Order: SVU." She spoke with Nicki Gostin. NEWSWEEK: DO you ever turn on the TV and say, "I can't...
Messy, but Not A Mess
Byline: George F. Will The always-evolving nomination process provides ample time and challenges to compel candidates to reveal their characters and skills. Someone urging a "bold," "decisive," "comprehensive" solution to this or that problem...
On 'Perfecting' the Jews
Byline: Lisa Miller Nobody is perfect, least of all Ann Coulter -- and I'm not going to worry about what she thinks about me. Imagine, if you will, a world in which the right-wing pundit Ann Coulter were not a grating opportunist who said horrible...
Opening A New Chapter
Byline: Michael G. Herman; Herman Lives In Beverly Hills, Calif. For 18 years, I kept a diary of my son's life. Now that he's in college, what will become of these journals? Two months ago, my wife and I sadly, reluctantly proudly abandoned our...
Pespectives
"This was truly an appointment with destiny." Elizabeth Gibson, on finding a painting by Mexican artist Rufino Tamayo nestled between two big garbage bags on a New York City street. The abstract piece, missing since 1970, is expected to fetch $1...
Picasso: No. 1 with A Palette
Byline: Peter Plagens We all know who's the most celebrated artist of the century. The question is: why him? By the mid-1920s, PabloPicasso was one of the most celebrated men in Paris, and he liked people to know it. He rode around town in a...
SoCal under Siege
Byline: Andrew Murr Even as flames raced up the dry canyon toward his house in rural Agua Dulce, north of Los Angeles, Bob Baker refused to evacuate. In minutes, the inferno was roaring at his backyard. "It's all over," Baker thought. But then,...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham With the possible exceptions of who assigns the arrows in the Conventional Wisdom Watch and where to send My Turn submissions, the question we are asked most frequently is how we decide what goes on the cover. Like politics,...
The Ghosts We Think We See
Byline: Sharon Begley Normal brain functions, such as seeing patterns, make us more likely to believe in the supernatural. Bruce Hood usually conducts experiments under much more rigorous conditions than this, but since he had a large audience...
The Once and Future Queen
Byline: Jonathan Darman Elizabeth's imperiled England is a lot like the America Clinton could well wind up leading. Queens are meant to be looked at, not touched. Early in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age" (in theaters now), England's Elizabeth I,...
The Pain of A Lost Memory
Byline: N'Gai Croal It's not very often that the head of a tech company makes me feel guilty. But that's what happened last month during a conversation with Seagate Technology CEO Bill Watkins, whose company is the world's largest hard-drive manufacturer....
The Scorched- Earth Obsession
More than one California fire is being blamed on arson. Inside the mind of the fire starters. They call it the "devil winds." Dave Hillman woke up at 2 a.m. last Monday feeling sick. The weather reports forecast high winds, and Hillman, chief arson...
'The Strangest Kind of Limbo You Can Imagine'
Byline: Jamie Reno Stay? Go? One family tries to make up its mind. Last Tuesday morning, NEWSWEEK's Jamie Reno wrote this account of his family's anxious vigil in their home as the Witch Creek fire burned just north in hard-hit Rancho Bernardo...
Viva Las Vegas! Viva America!
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Ashley Harris Gambling may be many things: a bad habit, an addiction to some, a sin to others. In America, it's a massive industry. A British couple strolls around the corner from St. Mark's Square and asks for a canal-side...