Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 13, March 31

A Sisterhood of Suffering
Byline: Carla Drew; Drew Lives In Warrenton, Va. When I miscarried, I was devastated. But I soon learned there were many more out there like me. The little panel flashed the word "pregnant" at me, and my hand jerked in surprise. The damning wand...
A Slip-Up, Then a Spin
Byline: Michael Hirsh An offhand assertion by Sen. John McCain last week has become a litmus test for one of the presidential campaign's biggest questions: who's really ready to be commander in chief? While in the Mideast, McCain asserted that it's...
At Liberty to Laugh
Byline: Joshua Alston Tracey Ullman just became a citizen. So how does she celebrate? By making fun of her new home. America is the land of optimism, and since becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen last year, Tracey Ullman, the British-born, shape-shifting...
Because It's Right
Byline: Anna Quindlen It's hard to serve your country in Baghdad or Kabul. It shouldn't be hard to pay for college once you've come back home. James Webb, the Vietnam Vet and senator from Virginia who was once secretary of the Navy, likes to...
Everything Is Illuminated
Byline: Malcolm Jones Classics Illustrated once introduced millions of children to the pleasures of a great story. A new generation of publishers is betting they can do the same. Memory lane is often a dead-end street, all promise and no delivery....
For Those Who've Fallen, Salvation amid the Suds
Byline: Allison Samuels The new gospel of the post-Wright pastors A few blocks away from the Ebenezer Baptist Church in downtown Atlanta, the congregation that Martin Luther King Jr. once led, sits the neighborhood carwash. It's a rough place...
From Search Wars to Star Wars
Byline: Steven Levy Want to explore the mysteries of deep space from your desktop? Google can help you. And soon, so can Microsoft. Normally my digital peregrinations take me to destinations like Facebook, YouTube and BOINGBOING.net. But lately...
Garbage in, Garbage Out
Byline: Mary Chapman How do you know when your city's sewage problem has gotten out of control? When a tall geyser explodes through the ground and swallows a Corvette. It happened late last year near Raleigh, N.C., according to local officials,...
Girls Will Be Girls. or Not
Byline: Julia Baird; With Karen Springen, Catharine Skipp And Jac Chebatoris Why aren't more powerful public women caught up in sex scandals? Catherine the Great was a woman with an extravagant, exacting sexual appetite. During the 34 years of...
Glimpses of A Golden Age
Byline: Mark Starr While Major League Baseball opens its season Tuesday showcasing its future--the Oakland A's face the champion Boston Red Sox in Tokyo--former MLB commissioner Fay Vincent has kept a keen eye on the game's past. His second volume...
Hillary: What's in a Name?
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and Martha Brant Preston Bynum still remembers Hillary Rodham. The former chief of staff for Arkansas Gov. Frank White, Bynum worked on White's campaign to oust a young Bill Clinton from the governor's mansion in 1980, an...
Hold the Hysteria (for Now)
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The real economy of production and jobs is not yet in a state of collapse, even though much of the commentary suggests it's on the edge of ruin. Regarding the economy, it's hard not to notice this stark contrast: the...
How a Lack of Faith Pounded the Markets
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Ashley Harris and Barrett Sheridan in New York, and Daniel Stone in Washington Once-mighty Bear Stearns has become the latest victim of Wall Street's growing crisis of confidence. Last Monday morning, $2 bills could...
It's Time to Trim the Fat
Byline: Linda Stern Sara and Michael Brady, new parents in Springfield, Pa., are wearing this season's new fashion: tight belts. She's a systems analyst, he's a CPA, and together they've squeezed $200 a month out of the family budget. They've halved...
It Was Always Headed Here
Byline: Ellis Cose Obama invited some serious thinking, an invitation that's been extended many times in the past. Last Wednesday, Barack Obama finally found himself in a role that he had previously managed to avoid: that of explaining the history...
Mugabe's Last Stand
Byline: Scott Johnson; With Karen MacGregor In Durban A former close ally may offer the best chance yet of toppling Zimbabwe's dictator at the ballot box. Politics is dangerous business in Robert Mugabe's Zimbabwe. So this crowd of 4,000 tired-looking...
Pass the Mint Jelly All Year
Byline: Julia Reed Everybody eats more lamb than we do. In Australia and New Zealand, they consume 40 times as much. When I was growing up I spent as much time as I could visiting my maternal grandparents in Nashville. While I really loved my...
Perspectives
"So?" Vice President Dick Cheney, responding to ABC News's White House correspondent Martha Raddatz, after she cited a recent poll showing that most Americans do not believe the Iraq War was worth fighting "The American people have input every...
Retirement Postponed
Byline: Daniel McGinn and Temma Ehrenfeld Baby boomers who'd expected to quit work by now discover they can't afford it. Blame the meltdown. Charles Burge had been counting the days until retirement. He spent decades as a New York City employee,...
Run for 'The Hills'
MTV's hit reality show "The Hills" returns this week, and we're betting that if you're older than Mischa Barton-- or don't know who Mischa Barton is--you've never watched. We asked Lauren Conrad, the queen of "The Hills," to give us seven reasons anyone...
Saddam's Files
Byline: Michael Isikoff They show terror plots, but raise new questions about some U.S. claims. President Bush said lots of things about Saddam Hussein in the run-up to the Iraq War. But few of his charges grabbed more attention than an unscripted...
Stay-at-Home Mad
Byline: Susanna Schrobsdorff A reality show touches off some real drama about when a soccer mom should get back in the game. What do soccer moms fantasize about? That list would probably be too long--and semi-unprintable. But some of them dream...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham What politicians call themselves reflects how they think, and how they would like to be thought of. FDR used FDR, partly because it echoed his great ancestor TR and partly because, I suspect, it sounded imperial. LBJ echoed his...
The Myth of 'Best in the World'
Byline: Sharon Begley A spate of new research shows the U.S. behind other countries in cancer survival and diabetes care. Not to be heartless or anything, but let's leave aside the dead babies. In international comparisons of health care, the...
The Next Saffron Revolution
Byline: Melinda Liu; With Sudip Mazumdar In Dharamsala, Jonathan Ansfield In Tongren And Mary Hennock In Beijing The Dalai Lama wants to talk peace, but the anger of his long-suffering people is only hardening. The streets of Dharamsala, India,...
The Obama Dividend
Byline: Jonathan Alter Instruct. Illuminate. Rearrange our mental furniture. That's a president's challenge. "The Presidency," Franklin D. Roosevelt told a reporter shortly after he was elected in 1932, "is pre-eminently a place of moral leadership."...
The Working-Class Smoker
Byline: Jerry Adler Increases in life expectancy in recent decades have left behind those who didn't go to college. Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire mayor of New York City, is a fanatical opponent of smoking, and if you had his life, you'd...
Ways We Can Fix This Giant Mess
Byline: Robert Rubin, Carly Fiorina, Gene Sperling, Bob Lutz, Joseph Stiglitz, Robert Shiller, Douglas Holtz-Eakin Economists and businessmen from both sides of the aisle tell us what needs to be done to solve the crisis. Robert Rubin Chair...
When Barry Became Barack
It didn't happen overnight. But in college, the young Barry took to being called by his formal name. What this evolution tells us about him. Barry Obama decided that he didn't like his nickname. A few of his friends at Occidental College had already...
With A Quiet Blessing, U.S. Attacks on Al Qaeda Spike
Byline: Mark Hosenball, Zahid Hussain And Ron Moreau The United States has stepped up its use of pilotless planes to strike at Qaeda targets along Pakistan's rugged border area, a measure that in the past drew protests from President Pervez Musharraf...