Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 16, April 20

A Dead Man Scheming?
Byline: Mark Hosenball It's a mystery what the head of Scotland Yard's anti-terrorism squad was thinking when he walked into the U.K. prime minister's office at 10 Downing Street carrying in plain view a "secret" report about Al Qaeda's attack planning....
A Fighter Disarmed
Byline: Allison Samuels Mike Tyson is done with being a poster boy for bad behavior--but don't ask him what comes next. When "Tyson" debuted at the Cannes film festival last May, the audience jumped to its feet--and stayed there, clapping, for...
Agony, Hope & Resolve
Epilepsy entered our lives more than 25 years ago, and unless things change, I fear that outcomes for families in the future won't be any better than they were for us. Twenty-three mind-numbing medications. Brain stimulation. Special diets. Countless...
A Racial Divide
Byline: Jesse Ellison Blacks experience heart failure earlier and at a far greater rate than whites. Todd Bowen, a 42-year-old father of seven, has been visiting the In the Cut barbershop in Inglewood, Calif., every two weeks for seven years....
A Serious Cup of Joe (Scarborough)
Byline: Seth Colter Walls The former GOP congressman has a hit TV talk show that succeeds by being substantive at sunrise. When it comes to viewership, you cannot stop Fox News--you can only hope to contain it. But while the pioneers of finger-jabbing...
A Storm in the Brain
Byline: Jon Meacham The toll of epilepsy has been overlooked--and the research underfunded--for too long. A call to action. The statistics are stark and sobering-- and for the uninitiated (which is to say most of us), startling. Epilepsy in America...
Debt Be Not Proud
Byline: Daniel Gross One moment the government is solicitous of bondholders. The next it tells creditors to go jump in a lake. At a conference earlier this month on the panic of 2008, a group of distinguished academics tried to puzzle out the...
Don't Call It Country
Byline: Steve Tuttle In what the reactionary me considers the good old days, Johnny Cash "shot a man in Reno just to watch him die." George Jones sang, "If drinkin' don't kill me, her memory will," and he lived what he sang, missing concerts and...
Epilepsy in America: What Must Be Done
Byline: Jon Meacham It was supposed to be an ordinary Saturday. on Feb. 16, 2008--a cool but not cold late winter's day--my wife and I had plans for a late breakfast with a colleague of mine in New York when the call came. The bright, beautiful...
Faith, Fear and the Wages of Columbine
Byline: Matthew Philips and Lisa Miller Two pastors from opposite ends of the theological spectrum are still haunted by the school massacre. How do you preside over the funeral of a 17-year-old boy who went to school one Tuesday morning and,...
Gay-Pride Grenade
Byline: Joshua Alston Gay- and lesbian-rights activists have been waiting for a soundtrack with sufficient snarl. But no more. The gays and lesbians fighting for equal rights have a lot going for their movement. There's the whole tide-of-history...
How A New CEO Took A Crash Course in Biology
Byline: Richard M. Smith Amgen's Kevin Sharer on the lessons of General Custer, nuclear subs and asking good questions. There are many differences between overseeing the nuclear reactor on a Navy submarine and running a $15 billion biotech company....
'In the Great Ship Titanic'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Nobel physicist Steven Chu is out to revitalize U.S. industry and save the world--if he can. The Department of Energy is at the center of U.S. efforts to end our dependence on foreign oil, roll back climate change and create...
In the Grip of the Unknown
Byline: Jerry Adler and Eliza Gray; With Sarah Kliff It takes courage and discipline to live every day with the haunting uncertainty of epilepsy. A good doctor helps, too. The worst thing about the epileptic seizure Dan Wheeless suffered on the...
Is Robert Gates A Genius?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In the past, weapons production has existed in a dreamland, regardless of enemies, costs or trade-offs. When a true genius appears," the English satirist Jonathan Swift wrote, "you may know him by this sign; that all the...
It Doesn't Have to Hurt
Government should use the lessons of behavioral economics to get us to invest more for retirement. Aging Americans are facing a perfect storm when it comes to retirement. Many have done little saving over the past two decades and have now seen what...
Let's Get Ready to Reconcile!
Byline: Jonathan Alter Republicans are shocked that a tool they used might now be used for Obama's agenda. Sex, drugs and rock and roll. Sounds fun, except that this column is about reconciliation, obfuscation and cap-and-trade. A pity, I know,...
Mail Call: From the Left, an Attack on Obama
'Obama Is Wrong': Readers responding to our April 6 cover story were divided--and often passionate--in their views about the Nobel Prize-winning economist. "I am not a very religious person, but I thank God for Paul Krugman," one wrote. Another argued...
Modernity's Worldwide Belief Boom
Byline: Eve Conant The Economist's John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge's new book, "God Is Back," argues that as the world grows more modern, it also becomes more religious. This is a good thing, the authors say: although religion can spawn...
No Headline
"I hate to say this, but he's a serial exaggerator. If I was being unkind, I would say 'liar'." Republican strategist Karl Rove, on Vice President Joe Biden's claim that he rebuked President George W. Bush during private meetings "We will --...
Obama Gets Gun-Shy
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Suzanne Smalley Despite a recent spate of killings, the president and fellow Democrats choose not to wage war on assault weapons. On the morning of April 4, Richard Poplawski had a quarrel with his mother. It was...
One Serious Dude, Indeed
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Kal Penn has hung up his hospital scrubs. His character died on "House" last week so that Penn can start a new job--in the White House. He'll work as associate director at the Office of Public Liaison, as the point person...
Power Up
Byline: Rana Foroohar; With Mac Margolis in Rio de Janeiro and Jason Overdorf in New Delhi The world has long expected China to emerge as an economic superpower, but the downturn may cause it to happen sooner. As Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao informed...
Sex, Race and IQ: Off Limits?
Byline: Sharon Begley Scientists who study intelligence risk adopting a policy of 'unilateral disarmament.' Granted, the study of racial and sex differences in intelligence has not exactly covered itself in glory. There was that unfortunate incident...
Tear Down This Wall
Byline: Patrick Symmes; Symmes is the author of "The Boys From Dolores: Fidel Castro's Classmates From Revolution to Exile." Instead of just closing the Guantanamo Bay detention center, how about if we throw the place wide open? Dayana Mendoza,...
The Debt Crusader
Byline: Daniel McGinn Inspired by Dr. Phil, Harvard's Elizabeth Warren has gone to D.C. to change the way America borrows. The stereotypical image of Harvard law school is of a crowded lecture hall dominated by a crusty, intimidating professor--think...
The Few, the Proud, the Savvy
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas In his farewell address in January 1961, President Dwight Eisenhower warned against the military-industrial complex, the cozy relationship between the Pentagon, Congress and defense contractors. In April 2009,...
The New Shopping Superpowers
Byline: Jim O'Neill; O'NEILL is chief economist at Goldman Sachs. As U.S. consumers flag, foreigners are picking up the slack. China's February trade surplus plunges, industrial production falls to record lows, electricity consumption slows dramatically,...
The Real 'Green' Innovation
Byline: Daniel Gross Alternative energy depends more on financial tricks than simple engineering. Amid this withering contraction, at least one clean-energy company is booming. The 380 employees of SolarCity, based in Foster City, Calif., are...
'The Real Spinal Tap'
Byline: Jennie Yabroff 'Spinal Tap' made mockumentaries the art form of our time. It also made life hell for every struggling hair-metal band--just ask Anvil. True story: when "This Is Spinal Tap" premiered in 1984, audiences thought it was a...
The What of Nations?
Byline: George F. Will A pandering Obama praised Europe's 'leading role in the world.' Actually, Europe exercises almost no leadership, even in Europe. "He's a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start...
We Are Not in This Together
Byline: Zachary Karabell; Karabell is president of River Twice Research. Young, minority men who didn't earn much to begin with are hit hardest by unemployment. More than 4 million Americans have been fired since last fall, and the job losses...
Why Is It A Sin to Read for Fun?
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Jodi Picoult makes lots of people love books--but has she become too successful to be taken seriously? The young woman with blonde ringlets has a question: where did Jodi get her green-velvet hair scrunchie? Jodi, who has...
Women: Truly the Fairer Sex
Men, the theory goes, prefer law with rigid rules and clear lines; women tend to favor an 'ethic of care' over an 'ethic of rights.' It's a near certainty among Supreme Court watchers that President Obama will fill the bench's next vacancy with...