Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 24, June 15

A Casualty of the Abortion War
Byline: Amanda Robb; Robb is an author living in New York City. My mother left me a voice mail on the afternoon of May 31. Before she even spoke, I could hear that she was crying. "Another doctor has been killed," she said, then hung up. Suddenly...
A Prosecutor Gets Personal
Byline: Michael Isikoff Patrick Fitzgerald may be the most feared prosecutor in the country, but even as he's racked up headlines for big-name convictions (Scooter Libby) and indictments (Rod Blagojevich), the hard-charging U.S. attorney from Chicago...
A Reader's Guide to the Colbert Issue
Byline: Jon Meacham This is, to say the least, not your usual issue of NEWSWEEK. It is about Iraq, which is not unusual, but it has been guest-edited by Stephen Colbert, which is decidedly unusual. The story of how this came to be is told on the...
Canada's New Leaf
Byline: Gretel C. Kovach America's war deserters could always take comfort in Canada. Now, it's the country that's deserting them. Kimberly Rivera thought joining the Army would solve her problems. Before she enlisted in 2006, she was struggling...
Children of Conflict
Byline: Jessica Ramirez Since 9/11, more than a million kids have had a parent deployed. their childhoods often go with them. The Harding girls have their own name for the local Applebee's--"the bad-news place." The last two times their father...
Color My World Burnt Sienna
Byline: Louisa Thomas For a child, a box of Crayola crayons can be a wondrous thing. When I was in elementary school, I was particularly taken with burnt sienna. It was neither brown nor red, but seemed taken from the earth, and it had the most...
Confessions of a Dangerous Novelist
Byline: Nicki Gostin Barris created The Dating Game, The Newlywed Game and The Gong Show. But since his retirement he's become a writer best known for Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. His novel Who Killed Art Deco just came out in -paperback. He...
Deflation and Inflation?
The Fed could end up facing both. To make sense of today's most perplexing economic debate--whether we're flirting with inflation or -deflation--it's worth recalling what happened after World War II. Under intense political pressure, President Truman...
Don't 'iTune' Us
It's geeks versus writers. Guess who's winning. Attention, would-be professional bloggers: the nice folks at Amazon have good news and bad news for you. The good news is that Amazon now lets anyone create a blog and sell subscriptions to owners...
From Bench to Bedside
Byline: Sharon Begley Academia slows the search for cures. Now that President Obama has almost all of his top science picks in place--from the Department of Energy to the FDA--the lack of an appointee for director of the Nation-al Institutes...
Iran-Iraq
Byline: Larry Kaplow; With Hussam Ali and Saad Al-Izzi in Baghdad and Hassan Al-Jarrah in Najaf Nuri Al-Maliki steps out of Iran's shadow. Decades later, the memory still rankles Iraq's prime minister. Nuri al-Maliki was an exile in southern...
Iran Turns against Its President
Byline: Maziar Bahari Mahmoud Ahmadinejad--Holocaust denier, nuclear aspirant and the West's favorite bugbear--may soon become the ex-president of Iran. According to recent government-funded polls seen by NEWSWEEK, some 16 million to 18 million...
Letters: 'Crazy Talk: Oprah, Wacky Cures & You'
Oprah's not perfect, but that's why we love her. She can be full of herself at times--but at least she's authentic and trying to help people. She's done a lot of good. Julie Coan, Houston, Texas I've wasted many hours reeducating my patients...
Love Is a Battlefield
Byline: Daniel Stone, Eve Conant and John Barry; With Larry Kaplow in Baghdad For some soldiers, there's no place like combat. Staff Sgt. Shaun McBride would rather be in a war zone than at home. He likes the adrenaline, he says, even the "fear...
Our Real Prison Problem
Why are we so worried about Gitmo? The public-opinion two-step on the wisdom of closing the prison camp at Guantanamo is fascinating, and not just because, as recent polling shows, Americans are inclined to keep it open forever. The current legal...
Peanut-Butter Politics
Byline: jonathan alter; Alter has made three appearances on The Colbert Reporttwo of them were good. S.C. Education funding is a sticky issue. "education is the dullest of subjects," Jacques Barzun wrote in the very first sentence of his astonishingly...
The Battle over the Battle of Fallujah
Byline: Dan Ephron; With Dina Maron in Washington A videogame so real it hurts. peter tamte was months away from completing his dream project--turning the largest urban battle of the Iraq War into a videogame--when it all seemed to fall apart....
Victory in Iraq
How we got here is a matter for history. But the democratic ideal is still within reach. By Fareed Zakaria "America is not the crude stereotype of a self-interested empire," said President Obama in his Cairo speech. There are many in the Muslim...
Why I Took This Crummy Job
Byline: Stephen Colbert, Guest Editor No, your eyes aren't deceiving you. You're reading Stephen Colbert. And for that I apologize. The last thing I want is to contribute to the corrosive influence of the print media. I prefer to yell my opinions...
Worried They Will Miss the War
Inside the Mind of West Point's Class of 2009. A festive crowd gathers on a beautiful spring afternoon at the United States Military Academy. Camouflage-clad cadets, middle-aged professors, assorted civilians and even a few children line the road...