Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 8

Beliefwatch: Blasphemy; "Hi My Name Is Lindy and I Deny the Existence of the Holy Spirit and You Should Too."
Byline: Jerry Adler With that five-second submission to YouTube, a 24-year-old who uses the name "menotsimple" has either condemned herself to an eternity of punishment in the afterlife or struck a courageous blow against superstition. She's one...
Bill Clinton; Recollections of the Public and Private Gerald Ford. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Bill Clinton, Nancy Reagan, Brent Scowcorft, James Cannon Bill Clinton The 42nd President 'I was grateful for his counsel' Thirty-two years ago, when President Ford took the oath of office, I was running for Congress in Arkansas....
Contrition as Leadership; Smarter Today Than Yesterday. That's True of the American People on Iraq. It Would Be Good to Learn That It's True of Their Leader as Well
Byline: Anna Quindlen When word circulated that the president would make a speech to the nation on Iraq in the new year, there was speculation about what he would say. Some suspected he would just repeat boilerplate sentiments about bringing freedom...
Death of a Tyrant; He Killed Not Only Kurds and Shiites but Baathist Rivals. His End Was Ignominious
Byline: Christopher Dickey (With Michael Hastings and Scott Johnson in Baghdad, Richard Wolffe in Washington and Babak Dehghanpisheh) President George W. Bush was sleeping at 9 p.m. at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, when Saddam Hussein's body plunged...
Dick Cheney; Recollections of the Public and Private Gerald Ford. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Dick Cheney Dick Cheney Vice President 'Confidence in His Bearing' He was an unassuming man, our 38th president, and few have ever risen so high with so little guile or calculation. Even in the three decades since he left office,...
Environment: Bears on Thin Ice
Byline: Jerry Adler An adult polar bear needs, on average, four to five pounds of seal blubber a day to survive, and it earns every ounce of it: crouching for hours in the Arctic cold alongside an opening in the ice, waiting for a seal to surface...
Environment: Easy to Be Green
Byline: Joan Raymond You don't have to ditch leather or sell your car to help the environment. We've gathered 10 simple tips for living greener in 2007. Hey, it's a lot easier than losing those 15 pounds. 1Feed The Bees Pesticides, pollution...
Ford's Long Shadow; an Unlikely President, Ford Steadied America and, in an Unpublished Interview, Mused about Her Fate
Byline: Michael Beschloss He was a larger figure than you might have thought. Many familiar personalities--politicians, movie stars, newscasters--are smaller in fact than they are on television or in photographs. In his 1970s-modern desert house...
Henry Kissinger; Recollections of the Public and Private Gerald Ford. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Henry Kissinger Henry Kissinger Former Secretary Of State 'He Moved With Calm' I first met president ford in the mid-1960s, when I was a professor at Harvard. I was conducting a defense-policy seminar. It was customary to invite...
In Memoriam; Recollections of the Public and Private Gerald Ford. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: George Herbert Walker Bush George Herbert Walker Bush The 41st President 'He Gave Us A New Day' I got to know Jerry Ford when I was running for the Senate down here in Texas in 1964. I lost that one, and then he campaigned actively...
Iran: A Brewing Battle of Heavyweights in Tehran
Byline: Maziar Bahari Iranians are deserting the president they elected by a landslide in June 2005. Not only did university students heckle Mahmoud Ahmadinejad with chants of "Death to the dictator!" during a speech last month in Tehran, state-run...
James Brown, 1933-2006
Byline: David Gates It's been almost 40 years since james brown gave the most overwhelming concert I've ever attended, or ever will. On April 5, 1968, he played the Boston Garden--less than 24 hours after the assassination of Martin Luther King....
Letters to the Magazine
Readers responding to our cover story on the recommendations of the bipartisan Iraq Study Group were nearly unanimous that a new direction is necessary. One said, "The realities articulated by the ISG are some of the loudest, most credible and brutally...
Newsmakers: Clive Owen, Keith Urban, Nicole Kidman, Rosie O'Donnell, Donald Trump, P. Diddy, Arnold Schwarzenegger
Byline: Nicki Gostin Clive Owen Owen stars in "children of Men," a futuristic thriller about saving the only pregnant woman in a society thought to be entirely sterile. He chatted with Nicki Gostin. Take this as a compliment--I wanted to stick...
Oprah Goes to School; True, the World's Most Successful Woman Has Always Shared Her Wealth. but Her Latest Project Is Really One for the Books
Byline: Allison Samuels Two thousand and six was the year Africa went Hollywood: Madonna, Clooney, Brangelina. And now, in 2007, the most exclusive spot on the continent will undoubtedly be in the town of Henly-on-Klip, about 40 miles outside Johannesburg....
Perspectives
"Where does [Bush] get his advice?" Former president Gerald R. Ford, in a just-now-published New York Daily News interview from last May, opposing President Bush's reasoning for the Iraq war "The governor was awake, alert and talking in the...
'Surge' Strategy; the Military Mission Is Shifting. Are More Troops Really the Answer Anymore?
Byline: Michael Hastings, Michael Hirsh and Richard Wolffe He was caught just like a rat." Those were the simple, happy words of Ray Odierno three years ago, after units of his Fourth Infantry Division cornered Saddam Hussein in Tikrit. The hulking...
The 38th President: More Than Met the Eye; as a Youngster, Ford Survived a Turbulent Family Life by Learning the Art of the Deal-And He Used That Skill to Thrive amid the Wars of Washington
Byline: Evan Thomas (With Barbara Kantrowitz) On the morning of Sunday, Sept. 8, 1974, after he had been president for about a month, Gerald Ford took communion at St. John's Episcopal Church on Lafayette Square, across from the White House. He...
The Bushes' Saddam Drama
Byline: Howard Fineman Evil was on the loose in the world, President George W. Bush had told the country, and on his first Thanksgiving in office--November 2001--he was on his way to Fort Campbell in Kentucky to dine with newly trained troops heading...
The Economic Mega-Worry; It's Productivity, Which Is the Wellspring of Our Rising Living Standards. Growth Has Been Strong for the Last Decade, but It May Now Be Slowing
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The start of a new year is a good time to take stock, and there are few better indicators of our long-term economic prospects--and also our prospects for political and social peace--than productivity. As anyone who's...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham It was nearly noon on an over-cast August day in Beaver Creek, Colo., in 1998, and former president Gerald R. Ford, wearing a pressed golf shirt and seated on a flowered sofa, was revisiting the past. He had kindly granted NEWSWEEK...
The Importance of Being Neighborly; the People Next Door Are Strangers, but They Don't Need to Stay That Way. Why I Invited One Man Inside
Byline: Thea Rhiannon (Rhiannon lives in Bend, Ore.) The oil stain on my garage floor has faded to a dusty umber, the same nondescript color as the other random blots that collect on concrete over the years. Once, it was a shallow black puddle,...
Vengeance of the Victors
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The saga of Saddam's end--his capture, trial and execution--is a sad metaphor for America's occupation of Iraq. What might have gone right went so wrong. It is worth remembering that Saddam Hussein was not your run-of-the-mill...
Wanna Buy a Bridge to Big-Time Debt?
Byline: Allan Sloan It's the happiest of New Year's on Wall Street, which is positively awash in money. No, I'm not talking about the jaw-dropping eight-digit bonuses at Goldman Sachs or the even bigger unpublicized paydays for heavy hitters at...