Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 16

Across the Divide
***** CORRECTION: In "Across the Divide" we should have said the State of the Black Union event that Cornel West participated in was in Hampton, Va., not Atlanta. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline: Richard Wolffe and Daren Briscoe ...
A Dangerous Patch
Byline: Joseph Contreras and Ed Caram The Pentagon prides itself on the ability of U.S. combat units to operate under cover of darkness. But that advantage could be eroded if a key item--infrared patches that troops use to ID each other at night--were...
After the Trailblazers; They Represent a 'Sea Change' in Black Politics: Leaders Who Appeal to All Races by Stressing Consensus over Conflict
Byline: Daren Briscoe When Cory Booker first ran for Newark city council in 1998, one of his opponents, George Branch, said, "[Booker's] a Rhodes scholar; I'm a roads scholar." The implication was not just that Booker lacked street smarts--it's...
Back on His Feet Again; How a Stretch in Prison Made Shoe Designer Steve Madden into a Better Man-And a Better Manager
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Steve Madden is showing off his spring collection: gumball-colored sneakers with wedges that look like souvenirs from an acid trip. Fix, they're called, appropriately enough. "Fix?!" groans a Brooklyn shoe-store owner, whom...
Barbarian No More; Henry Kravis Is Learning the Value of Being Second
Byline: Daniel Gross The afternoon of Tuesday, July 3, was dead calm on Wall Street. The markets had closed early at 1 p.m., and traders and brokers had long since hustled off to the Hamptons. But at 5:19 p.m., KKR & Co. quietly set off its...
Beware the Red Rings of Death
Byline: N'Gai Croal Even before Microsoft launched its Xbox 360 videogame console, there were signs it might not be ready for prime time. Shortly after the first units arrived in the hands of journalists and reviewers during the fall of 2005, the...
Border Disorder; Sgt. Julio Cesar Pacheco Won a Purple Heart in Iraq. Now He Sits in a Laredo Jail. What Happened in Texas?
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores and Monica Campbell (With Gretel C. Kovach and Alexandra Gekas) Sgt. Julio Cesar Pacheco had just returned from a nighttime mission in Iraq in August 2004 when mortars began raining down on his camp. Worried about his...
Coach, Teacher, Believer; for Tony Dungy, There's a Lot More to Life Than Winning the Super Bowl
Indianapolis colts coach Tony Dungy never envisioned becoming the next hot management guru by writing a boastful "how I won the Super Bowl" book. But so many friends and fans urged him to share his views on faith, family and personal responsibility...
Doctor of Death; A Busted Terror Plot in Britain Puts the Spotlight on Radicalized Muslim Professionals
Byline: Evan Thomas and Mark Hosenball (With Stryker Mcguire, Ginanne Brownell, Emily Flynn Vencat in London, William Underhill in Glasgow, Silvia Spring in Newcastle-Under-Lyme, Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad, Sudip Mazumdar in New Delhi, Christopher...
Friends in High Places; Inside Bush's Decision to Give Scooter Libby a Pass
Byline: Michael Isikoff As is often the case in the Bush White House, it was a decision made swiftly, and with stealth. For weeks, allies of I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby had aggressively lobbied the president to pardon Dick Cheney's former chief of...
Indelible Love: My Son's Tattoos and Me; Alec Loves His Inked-Up Arm, and I Love Alec. So I've Gradually Come to Respect His Body Adornment
Byline: Lois Desocio (Desocio lives in Maplewood, N.J.) My 21-year-old son, Alec, has beautiful blue eyes, but the first thing people notice about him is his right arm. That's because waterfalls, big cats, Buddha and a host of Zen symbols cover...
Inspection Shutdown
Byline: John Barry The most successful international team ever assembled to probe suspected WMD activities is shutting down this week--thanks to U.S. and British insistence. The team (the U.N. commission initially acronymed UNSCOM and then UNMOVIC)...
Justice: The Newest Parent Trap
Byline: Sanhita Sen Elisa kelly of virginia probably thought she was being responsible when she bought alcohol for a party and let her underage son and his friends imbibe it under supervision. Instead, she and her then husband, George Robinson,...
Kiss, Kiss, Blah, Blah; the Last Two 'Harry Potter' Movies Soared, but the Dull 'Order of the Phoenix' Never Really Takes Flight
Byline: David Ansen Decidedly older, definitely angrier, Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) goes through his darkest days in "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix." He has good reason to be both paranoid and rebellious. Dementors attack him on...
Little Guy Has Little Recourse
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Remember the "ownership society" that the administration swore to promote and protect? Remember the admiration lavished on the so-called shareholding class? You probably thought that...
Newsmakers
Byline: Lorraine Ali Q & A: Slash Ex-Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash is back with a new album by his group Velvet Revolver. He spoke to NEWSWEEK's Lorraine Ali. Do you still get asked about what's happening with Guns N' Roses? I get that...
On the Road Again; Real Stars Never Die-Or Retire. Meet the Country Legends Who Are Taking Nashville's Kids to School
Byline: Brian Braiker Slouching slightly in an easy chair as he watches ESPN, Porter Wagoner suggests a kindly grandfather. His voice has thickened with age, his pace slowed by an abdominal aneurysm that nearly killed him last year. But those lady-killer...
Perspectives: Quotes in the News
"I rule nothing in or nothing out." President George W. Bush, after commuting the sentence of Lewis (Scooter) Libby, on whether he will grant a full pardon before leaving office "We cannot continue asking our troops to sacrifice indefinitely...
Reaching the High Notes
Byline: Katrine Ames Beverly Sills made her 1975 metropolitan Opera debut in Rossini's "The Siege of Corinth"--almost a decade later than she should have. The audience went wild. They knew that the soprano, born Belle (Bubbles) Silverman in Brooklyn,...
Road Rules for Gadgets
Byline: Cathy Lu You've probably seen them: drivers texting furiously on their BlackBerrys while stuck in traffic. Beachgoers hunched over laptops. Commuters juggling briefcases, cell phones and iPods. But as gadget lovers hit the road this summer,...
Signs of Progress; Obama Can't Take the 'Minority Vote' for Granted. That Reflects How Far We've Come in the Struggle to Get beyond Race
Byline: Ellis Cose (With Jemimah Noonoo) His is a peculiarly American paradox: Barack Obama is both transracial and largely defined by race. He stands with one foot in a longed-for postracial future and the other in America's thoroughly racialized...
Sisyphus in the Senate
Byline: George F. Will Sen. Ron Wyden, the Oregon democrat, has not received the memo explaining that Congress can accomplish nothing in an election year or the year before one. He calls himself the Senate's designated driver, the one not running...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Daniel Klaidman When Barack Obama burst onto the national political stage in 2004, there were many things about him that Americans found fresh and intriguing. He was young and optimistic; he seemed able to rise above the nasty partisanship...
The Flames of Hope; A Berkeley Physicist Has Found a Way to Help Keep Darfurians Alive, by Building a Better Kitchen Stove
Byline: Barrett Sheridan As for so many of us, the genocide in Darfur was merely an abstraction to Ashok Gadgil, a scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. But in September 2004 he got a call from the U.S. Agency for...
The Men of Summer; No 'House'? No 'Lost'? No Sweat. This Is Basic-Cable Season, and AMC's 'Mad Men' Is Its Must-See TV
Byline: Devin Gordon Is it weird that television's best new drama of the summer is on a channel called American Movie Classics? No more peculiar than MTV's thriving for years without playing much music, right? Besides, in the era of "The Sopranos,"...
The Power Broker; in an Exclusive Interview, Justice Kennedy Discusses Life, Center Stage
Byline: Stuart Taylor jr. and Evan Thomas (With Katie Connolly) In 19 cases during the past year, the Supreme Court split down the middle along ideological lines. The court's four conservatives--Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. and Justices Antonin...
The Stradivari of Ramadi; Some Americans in Iraq Spend the Off-Duty Hours on Their Game Machines; Others Keep Blogs or Work on Their ABS and Pecs. Sgt. Geoffrey Allison Made Violins
Byline: Dan Ephron Sgt. Geoffrey Allison had stuffed into his rucksack only enough wood to make two violins. An Army medic about to embark on a yearlong posting in Iraq, Allison figured he would be too busy to devote much time to his hobby. But...
The Toxic Republic; for Profit's Sake, China's People Are Getting Poisoned
Byline: Melinda Liu (With Jonathan Adams and Jonathan Ansfield in Beijing) Wang Hai's phone won't stop buzzing. Everyone in China seems to want urgent help from the country's No. 1 consumer-rights advocate. He helps not only ordinary buyers of defective...
Trouble in a 'Black Box'; Did an Effort to Reduce Teen Suicides Backfire?
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Seventeen-year-old Michael didn't want to end up crazed and suicidal like the Columbine killers. The Massachusetts teen had read that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were taking antidepressants when they rampaged murderously...
Weaponized Hamburgers? an Attack on the Food Supply Is Hard to Execute but Could Sicken or Kill Thousands. Complacency Makes 'Hard' Not Hard Enough
Byline: Sharon Begley To a post-9/11 lexicon of phrases like "threat level" and "homeland security," we need to add another: food defense. The possibility that the nation's food supply could be targeted by terrorists has existed since at least the...
Why We Went Nuts about the iPhone; People Hate Their Cell Phones, Steve Jobs Said, in Attempting to Explain the iPhone Anticipation
Byline: Steven Levy It's hard to determine the wackiest aspect of iPhone craziness leading up to the launch of Apple's eagerly (to say the least) awaited venture into the cell-phone world on June 29. Was it the relentless media attention, which...
Wii Can't Wait to Play; Steven Spielberg Makes His Return to Videogames
Byline: N'Gai Croal A true artist can find inspiration anywhere. But not many get to find it while playing Wii Tennis against Nintendo's legendary designer, Shigeru Miyamoto. For director Steven Spielberg, however, that's just another day out of...