Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 16, October 15

A Boom in 'Poorism'
Byline: Roxana Popescu Most tourists scrupulously avoid grubby alleys in foreign cities where they might brush past gun-toting drug lords, but Kevin Outterson, a law professor at Boston University, actually paid to do it. It was precisely the kind...
A Life Lesson Learned at the Stop & Shop
Byline: Jeffrey A. Blout; Blout Lives In Stoneham, Mass. I was obsessive about managing my time, until a small act of kindness slowed me down. It's noon on a Wednesday; I've got plenty to do, but I need to pick up a few things at the grocery...
A Magical Keyboard
Byline: Linda Stern A college student's experimental keyboard may help unlock the musical ability trapped inside individuals lacking the physical mobility to play traditional instruments. The keyboard was created by a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute...
An Authentic Life
Real power comes from confronting the challenges each woman faces and passing on hard-won wisdom. Like most women of my generation, I was raised to believe that real power comes from your work, from a particular job or title. Early on, I struggled...
A Shot through the Art
Byline: Eve Conant Randolph College needs cash, so it's selling some paintings. Some say the school is also selling its soul. The Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College is closed to tourists on Mondays, so Karol Lawson, the museum's director,...
Blackwater Is Soaked
Byline: Rod Nordland And Mark Hosenball; With Larry Kaplow In Baghdad And Michael Hastings In Washington An arrogant attitude only adds fuel to the criticism. The colonel was furious. "Can you believe it? They actually drew their weapons on U.S....
Capital Ideas
Byline: Linda Stern The U.S. housing bubble may have burst, but many American investors are looking at real estate in Europe and Asia. It's been a smart play: foreign real estate doesn't move in tandem with the U.S. market, so it can be a good way...
Cell Phones Gone Crazy
Byline: Emily Flynn Vencat; With Sophie Grove In London The iPhone may be a tempting target for hackers. The phenomenal visibility of Apple's iPhone may spell the end of the cell-phone industry's age of security innocence. Mobiles have been largely...
Did Hillary Duck A Sucker Punch?
Byline: Howard Fineman Last March, Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia introduced a bill to insist that President Bush get congressional authorization if he wanted to attack Iran. A few of Webb's fellow Democrats, including Sen. Joe Biden, the chairman of...
Disorder in the Court
Byline: Dan Ephron Military commissions were supposed to ensure easy terror convictions, but that hasn't been the case. By the time he quit, Col. Morris Davis had endured more than his share of abuse. As chief Guantanamo Bay prosecutor for the...
Edison's Dimming Bulbs
Byline: Daniel Gross Fluorescents still cost more upfront. But Wal-Mart's attention and the policies of many governments are pushing incandescents toward extinction. Compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) cost more than regular incandescent bulbs....
Hard Driving
Byline: Steven Levy Digital storage is vital. But Seagate's CEO says we don't respect it -- and the country needs to keep it. Bill Watkins says storage is the Rodney Dangerfield of technology. Arguably, the advances in hard-disk drives and solid-state...
Honey, iBricked the New Mobile Phone!
Byline: Steven Levy It wasn't like Apple didn't warn them. The small but proud number of owners who had "unlocked" their iPhones to work with networks other than AT&T knew that the warranty forbade such hacking. If that weren't enough, Apple...
In All Their Glory
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Americans could elect our first female president in 2008. What the most powerful women of the past can teach us about how to rule in the future. She was born into a profoundly dysfunctional family. Her father married...
Lessons from the 1987 Crash
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We used to think that financial panics were a thing of the past. Now we know that they are a clear and present economic danger. The stock-market crash of 1987 was horrifying even to Americans who weren't shareholders....
Life Lessons from Kid Rock (No Hat Required)
Kid Rock has done a lot of living in his 36 years: a quickie marriage to Pam Anderson, single parenthood, a brawl with Tommy Lee, and now his 11th album, "Rock and Roll Jesus." Some survival tips from the man formerly known as Bob Ritchie: 1On being...
Lost in Translations
Byline: Malcolm Jones 'War and Peace' has been the Everest of literature for more than 150 years. Two new English versions remind us why Tolstoy's tome is still worth the climb. War and Peace" still looms large over the literary landscape, intimidating...
Mail Call: A Burst of Innovative Global Giving Pays Off
Readers hailed the health initiatives and proposals in our cover story "How to Heal The World." "Helping spread technology to students in poor countries by giving them $200 solar-powered laptops is a great idea," one wrote. Another praised an initiative...
My Journey to the Top
Byline: Interviews For This Package Were Conducted By Barbara Kantrowitz And Holly Peterson These 11 women came from many different backgrounds, but they all had big dreams. The path to power meant facing obstacles and their biggest fears. Arianna...
Now This Is Woman's Work
Byline: Karen Breslau There are more female governors in office than ever before, and they are making their mark with a pragmatic, postpartisan approach to solving state problems. In 1998, voters in a focus group were asked to close their eyes...
Out of Bounds
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Jimmy Dolan's sports empire is a humiliation. Does that make him unfit to run Daddy's cable company? If Madison Square Garden owner James Dolan ever needs material for his blues band, JD and the Straight Shot, he doesn't...
Out of the Skyboxes
Byline: Anna Quindlen It takes a special kind of confidence to wrestle democracy to the ground out in the open. That's what happened in Houston 30 years ago. Thirty years ago next month, 2,000 elected and appointed delegates and 18,000 observers...
Perspectives
"You have to evolve. Otherwise you're useless." Lt. Col. David Woods, on an experimental Pentagon program that enlists anthropologists to study insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan "If we took away women's right to vote, we'd never have to worry...
Quick Read
Byline: John David Sparks McIlhenny's Gold: How a Louisiana Family Built the Tabasco Empire by Jeffrey Rothfeder While pretentious restaurant menus may insist on recounting the provenance of even the most ordinary ingredients (artisanal hand-gathered,...
Rudy Giuliani: Would You Buy A Used Hawk from This Man?
Byline: Michael Hirsh; With Sarah Elkins And Steve Tuttle ***** CORRECTION: In "Would You Buy a Used Hawk From This Man?" (Oct. 15), several captions for photographs in an accompanyinggraphic ("Rudy's Right Hands") were inadvertently transposed....
Sleepwalking to Sanctions, Again
Byline: Fareed Zakaria If the purpose of sanctions is to bring about a better system for a country, devastating its society is a strange path to the new order. The Burmese government's grotesque crackdown on pro-democracy protests will have one...
Snide and Prejudice
Byline: Joshua Alston Two new sitcoms use such a tired comedic device they're positively prehistoric -- and offensive. The characters of ABC's "Cavemen" are saddled with all sorts of stereotypes, though not the hairy-back, drooling-mouth ones...
Spa Makeover
Byline: Daniel Mcginn; With Catharine Skipp In Miami And Roxana Popescu In Boston Canyon Ranch is the ultimate in health resorts. Now it's expanding to condos, day retreats and a cruise ship. Mel Zuckerman and Jerry Cohen were hiking in the Arizona...
Staying Power
Byline: Richard M. Smith In the land of TV, the talent's always on the move. At A&E, the CEO began her career there 23 years ago. In the entertainment industry, actors, directors and producers aren't the only ones who hop between projects...
'Strong like Saddam'
Byline: Kevin Peraino; With Larry Kaplow In Baghdad And An Iraqi Staff Reporter In Basra Kanan Al-Sadid was not yet 10 years old on the afternoon that his father opened the trunk of the family car and Saddam Hussein popped out. It was the early...
Terror, Torture and A Veil of Secrecy
Byline: Michael Isikoff Eager to show how aggressively it was revising U.S. counterterrorism policies, the White House released a statement two years ago touting its adoption of 37 of the 39 reforms recommended by the 9/11 Commission. But one of...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Skepticism -- not cynicism, but a healthy wariness -- is a reasonable reaction when you hear journalists engage in hyperbolitis ("more than ever before" is a good signal phrase of the affliction). Sometimes, though, a superlative...
They Shoot Horses, Don't They?
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Wild mustangs carried pioneers, cowboys and soldiers. Today, they're being sold for slaughter. An American dilemma. Chain saws don't usually take center stage in the rarefied world of equestrian showmanship. But that didn't...
To Catch a Cheat
Byline: Peg Tyre The pressure is on for schools to raise test scores. Some, it seems, are willing to resort to anything. For a while it seemed as though Forest Brook High School in Houston was a shining example of school reform. In 2005, after...
Visitors Wanted Now
Byline: Christian Caryl; With Sonia Kolesnikov-Jessop In Singapore Creating a brand identity for any country is hard. Being honest is the first step. Japan may be an export powerhouse, but it has a serious problem when it comes to importing tourists....
We're Not Gonna Take It
Byline: Allison Samuels One woman's case opens a dialogue about black misogyny. Will 2007 be remembered as the year black women said "Enough is enough"? At no small personal cost, Anucha Browne Sanders stood up and demanded an end to the kind...
Whacking Hackers
Byline: Mark Hosenball In a single case this summer, an attack by hackers disabled a reported 1,500 Pentagon computers. And the siege is continuing. The Defense Department detects 3 million unauthorized "scans" -- or attempts by would-be intruders...
What I Learned
Byline: These interviews were conducted by Barbara Kantrowitz and Holly Peterson Whether they're running universities, political campaigns or major corporations, these 11 remarkable women have found their own ways of overcoming obstacles. Amy...
What's in A Name?
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Shake-up is rare in the centuries-old business of backyard sports, but there's a new game in town: cornhole, a version of beanbag toss in which players score points by chucking bags of corn through a hole in a tilted board,...
'You Do What You Have to Do'
How two Hollywood women who faced family tragedies use their fame and contacts to help others At first glance, Lilly Tartikoff and Holly Robinson Peete seem to have only one thing in common: busy Hollywood lives. Tartikoff found fame, visibility...