Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 08, August 25

A Financial Earthquake
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Harvard dramatically overhauled its aid rules. Other colleges had to follow to compete for top students. How to make sense of it all. Jennie D'Amico first heard the news in an ecstatic e-mail from her father in Brewer,...
A Hassle at the Border
Byline: Mark Hosenball Next time you visit Canada, don't forget your doctor's note. Travelers who've had recent radiation treatment, like a bone scan or thyroid therapy, could face unexpected hassles when they enter U.S. border checkpoints from...
A Murder Mystery in Syria
Byline: Dan Ephron, Mark Hosenball and Kevin Peraino What happens when a cloak-and-dagger general is shot dead in an Arab country where the regime is secretive and the press regularly gagged? It ignites a blogosphere bonanza. The assassination early...
Buildings That Can Breathe
Byline: Fareed Zakaria A green designer says we need to save energy by making our architecture more efficient. Fareed Zakaria Architect William McDonough draws his green-building techniques from the world around him. Before attending architecture...
But I Did Everything Right!
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Jeneen Interlandi and Anna Kuchment in New York and Karen Springen in Chicago DNA discoveries are revealing why even the best parenting doesn't have the effects experts promise, from breast-feeding to letting kids learn...
Coddling Human Guinea Pigs
Byline: Sharon Begley Endless red tape and paternalism toward study volunteers is having a stifling effect on clinical research. Let's agree that people who are altruistic enough to volunteer for experiments should know what they're in for--if...
Don't Call Me-I May Call You
Byline: Howard Fineman Soon after he wrapped up the Democratic nomination in June, Sen. Barack Obama invited some of Sen. Hillary Clinton's key financial supporters--"bundlers" in the trade--to a private cocktail party and dinner in Washington....
Fussy Kid, Flustered Mom
Byline: Anne Underwood; With Anna Kuchment Kylee Smith, 5, of Richmond, Va., loves cheese--grilled cheese sandwiches, mac and cheese, cheese quesadillas. It's what she doesn't like that has her mom worried. Kylee won't eat meat, other than chicken...
John McCain's Court Jester
Byline: Holly Bailey All Steve Duprey wanted to do was make John McCain laugh. Riding on his campaign plane last June, the candidate was feeling low. The day before, he'd flubbed the delivery of a major speech in New Orleans and was being lampooned...
Kids, Put Down Your Cell Phones!
Byline: Kurt Soller Recent headlines have reported new concerns about the links between cell-phone use and brain cancer. Last month the Toronto Department of Public Health advised teenagers and young children to limit their cell-phone use, and Dr....
Making Do without the Minivan
Byline: Jennifer Perrow; Perrow lives in Seattle. Why do I love the high price of gas? It's helped my family stop being so dependent on our cars. The gas pump shuts off automatically when you hit $100, or so my sister-in-law tells me. I'm pleased...
Ms. Hilton Goes to Washington
Hillary Clinton, watch out: there might be a woman in the White House after all. Paris Hilton is now running for president of the United States of America. OK, not really. But after John McCain released an ad that compared Barack Obama to celebrities...
My Real Hollywood Ending
First Person: Romance led this former East Coast student to the harmonies of a cappella. The SoCal VoCals turned out to be life-changing. Going to school in Los Angeles is, in many ways, like being part of a giant Hollywood film. Out here, the sun...
Now This Is Umbrella Insurance
Byline: Daniel McGinn WeatherBill sifts through historical weather data to calculate the odds it might rain or snow on any day or week. We're in the homestretch of summer, and my family is squeezing in as much fun as we can. We're staying late...
On Realty Road, It's a Rough Ride
Byline: Jamie Reno and Catharine Skipp Real-estate agents are an optimistic bunch, but it's hard to put a positive spin on the nation's deepening housing bust. In the past year, the average U.S. home has lost 16 percent of its value, and the number...
Perspectives
"We don't sentence based on passion, we sentence based on law." Defense lawyer Charlie Swift, during the trial of Salim Ahmed Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's former driver. Hamdan received five years in prison for abetting terrorism--far less than the...
Remember to Flip Your Baby (Over)
First, the good news: The American Academy of Pediatrics' Back to Sleep program, which teaches parents to put their babies to sleep on their backs instead of their stomachs, has helped reduce cases of sudden infant death syndrome by 40 percent. The...
Rethinking Fathers' Rights
Much of what's wrong with family law today lies in warmed-over stereotypes of men as unsuited to caring for their children. Every few years, some father who believes he's been wronged by the family court system grabs headlines and draws attention...
Rise of the Sea Turtles
Byline: Melinda Liu And Duncan Hewitt China's most modern citizens aren't drawing it any closer to the West. Charles Zhang is practically the personification of hip, 21st-century China. The flamboyant, MIT-educated entrepreneur founded and runs...
Take the Bananas and Run
Byline: Jennie Yabroff At 72, a superstitious Woody Allen is still working hard, but is terrified of the void, the 'meaningless flicker' of life. Woody Allen cuts his banana into seven slices each morning. Six slices, or eight, and something...
The 12 Top Rivalries
Harvard and Yale officially deny any competition between the two Ivies. Ditto Annapolis and West Point. But Ohio State and Michigan invite students to bring it on. Who's really the best? You decide. Rivalry? What Rivalry? Ask our most famous colleges...
The Case Still Isn't Closed
Byline: Michael Isikoff When the FBI publicly branded the late Dr. Bruce Ivins as the anthrax killer, it unsealed court affidavits suggesting a possible motive for the mailing to one target: NBC anchor Tom Brokaw. According to the affidavits, Ivins...
The Caucasian Card
Byline: Anna Quindlen It can be tough being black in America. But the tough stuff builds character. Maybe that's why Barack Obama got this far this fast. Much of America's political conversation is couched in code. And so it was that recently...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham A few years ago--I cannot recall exactly when, but suspect it was 2005, after President Bush won his second term--I was on a plane from Nashville to New York and found myself in a conversation with a middle-aged, somewhat beefy...
The Great Energy Confusion
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Judged by their rhetoric, you might think McCain and Obama differ dramatically on energy. But their agendas overlap substantially. Forget about a candid national conversation on energy. As john McCain and Barack Obama...
The Pickens Profile You Haven't Read
Byline: Karen Breslau; With Daniel Stone in Washington and Ashley R. Harris in New York T. Boone has re-invented himself as a green wildcatter. Can he finish what Al Gore started? T. Boone Pickens can't read his lines. Squinting at his teleprompter,...
The Predators' Ball
Byline: Michael Hirsh Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have helped defang laws that might have prevented the subprime mess. Roy Barnes is a self-described "small-town" lawyer with a mane of silver hair and an Andy Griffith drawl. But like Griffith's...
Time to Hang Up the Keys
Byline: Temma Ehrenfeld Worried about your elderly parents' driving? Gerontologist Elizabeth Dugan (author of "The Driving Dilemma") and caring.com offer these tips on how you can catch signs of trouble and, when the time comes, encourage them to...
What Bush Got Right
Byline: Fareed Zakaria For the next president, simply reversing this administration's policies is not the answer. Compared with the flutters and flurries of the near-daily polls in the presidential race, one set of numbers has stayed fixed for...
What Rielle Hunter Told Me
Byline: Jonathan Darman A seeker and a New Age spiritualist, John Edwards's other woman believed she could help him make history. The first time I laid eyes on Rielle Hunter, I could tell she was a story. She had frizzy blond hair with DARK roots,...
Who's Too Old to Test?
Byline: Karen Springen Several new medical studies are reopening the debate over which men should be screened for prostate cancer, at what age the testing should stop and how doctors should interpret the test results, especially in obese men. What...
Would You Give This Boy A Statin?
Byline: Karen Springen Statins used to be for aging boomers and their parents. Now the American Academy of Pediatrics says the cholesterol-lowering drugs can help kids as young as 8 who suffer from extremely high cholesterol levels. (The FDA has...
You Don't Have to Be a Nerd
Byline: N'Gai Croal The videogames you're most likely to see at the moment are ones that will actually hold the interest of a nongeek. I still get questions every now and then from people looking for advice on how to get their hands on a Nintendo...