Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 19, November 10

A Darker Future for Us
It's not just the financial crisis: higher taxes, energy costs and health spending also threaten growth. We Americans are progress junkies. We think that today should be better than yesterday and that tomorrow should be better than today. Compared...
A Very Brady Confession
How the actress who played Marcia overcame cocaine and depression For most of my life people have expected me to be perfect. That's because I played the role of Marcia Brady--a pretty girl from a flawless family--from 1969 to 1974. She was perky,...
Back from the Lion's Den
Byline: Jesse Ellison In the new PBS documentary "Lioness," Specialist Shannon Morgan, a brawny, tattooed Army vet, conveys the anguish of post-traumatic stress disorder in one simple line. In the woods of her native Arkansas, she sits with a rifle...
Batting for the Cure
Byline: Michael Goldsmith; Goldsmith lives in Heber City, Utah. Diagnosed with a deadly but uncommon illness, I call upon the game of my youth to take action. I received my death sentence in September 2006 when doctors told me I had amyotrophic...
But Words Will Never Hurt Me
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey; With Suzanne Smalley and Anne Belli Perez The president, friends say, is handling the attacks on him with characteristic equanimity. If George Bush took the insults personally, he didn't let it show. On...
Cooperation Hits a Snag
Byline: Dan Ephron and Mark Hosenball Syrians say the Oct. 26 U.S. commando raid across its border targeting a Qaeda smuggler came as a surprise, ruining what appeared to be a thaw in relations between the two countries. Just two months ago, Secretary...
Here Today. Tomorrow?
Byline: Mark Hosenball No matter who wins the presidential election on Nov. 4, U.S. spy agencies worry that the intelligence community could be big losers, with heads rolling either way. Sources close to both campaigns did little to assuage those...
Hey, Brad, Get Ready for Cloris
Cloris Leachman-- At 82, the oldest (and spunkiest) contestant ever on "Dancing With the Stars"--was voted off the show last week. She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Are you demanding a recount? I should have. I don't know what possessed me not to....
Moving from Votes to Volts
As the election ends, Gingrich says the real energy challenges begin. During the presidential campaign, voters have heard endless talk about the candidates' plans to overhaul U.S. energy policy. Starting this week the winner will begin working to...
Narcissus Has Left the Pool
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan A trio of memoirs tells all about the lives of Hollywood heartthrobs. In 1954, Life Magazine ran a photograph of a trio of Hollywood heartthrobs. Rock Hudson, Tony Curtis and Robert Wagner posed hanging off a ladder,...
No Insurance? That's a Killer
Byline: David Noonan Uninsured patients are 50 percent more likely to die of traumatic injuries than those with health insurance. Reading medical journals can be a real headache. Sure, the topics are important, but the demands of scientific accuracy...
Perspectives
"I was shocked by the number Obama was able to draw -- It's just a stunning number." CBS chairman Leslie Moonves, on Sen. Barack Obama's 30-minute television campaign ad, which drew 33.6 million viewers across seven channels--more than last season's...
Roe V. Wade V. Kristi
Byline: Sarah Kliff You'd think Kristi Burton would be a hero to the pro-life establishment. She's only 21, still lives with her parents in Peyton, Colo., and is still in law school, but Burton has already succeeded where many like-minded activists...
Spread the Wealth? What's New?
McCain's attack implies that an Obama presidency would lead us toward the Swedish model. Unlikely. In the last lap of his campaign, John McCain is claiming that Barack Obama "believes in redistributing wealth." The problem with this charge is not...
Taliban Two-Step: Can't Sit Down Yet
Everyone's talking about talking to the Taliban. But before we jaw-jaw, there will be more war-war. Don't even ask Mullah Sabir about peace talks. There's nothing to talk about, says the tall, burly Afghan, one of the Taliban's highest-ranking commanders....
The Beltway's Man Who Never Sleeps
Byline: Suzanne Smalley It's 5 a.m. and Mike Allen has already been awake for nearly two hours. The baby-faced, 44-year-old reporter for Politico, the Beltway-obsessed Web site, gets up each morning at about 3:30 to compile Mike Allen's Playbook,...
The Change Agent
Our politics are rooted in the grand, complicated presidency of Andrew Jackson. In late January 1861, president-elect Abraham Lincoln was at home in wintry Springfield, Ill., contemplating his course. The South was seceding, the Union in danger...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham In his new book, "The Great Inflation and Its Aftermath: The Past and Future of American Affluence," NEWSWEEK columnist Robert J. Samuelson makes a compelling case that the current crisis is only one of a series of complicated...
The Laugh Factory
Byline: David Ansen Comedies mixing raunch and sentimentality are wildly successful, but they are starting to feel stale. If a new American comedy starts out with curses that would have made your great-grandmother blush and an obsession with...
The New Mainstream
Byline: Orlando Patterson; Patterson, author of "The Ordeal of Integration," is professor of sociology at Harvard University. Obama's win would be the culmination of a process of inclusion that began with Andrew Jackson. Victory for Barack Obama...
The Prospect of an Odd Couple
Byline: Kevin Peraino One morning this past summer, Barack Obama sat down around a conference table in Jerusalem's King David Hotel with Benjamin Netanyahu, the leader of Israel's Likud Party. Neither man ran a country but both had high hopes. The...
Today's Forecast: Cloudy
Byline: Daniel Lyons People are going to be putting their information not into some device but into some service that lives in the sky. Scott McNealy of Sun Microsystems used to call it "the big friggin' web-tone switch" ("Web tone" being the...
Untangling Charlie Kaufman
Byline: Jeremy McCarter Up all night with the director of 'Synecdoche' This is lame. I really should not be writing myself into an essay about Charlie Kaufman. Or should I? Kaufman does that sort of thing all the time. In "Adaptation," for instance:...
Waiting in Line
Byline: Anna Quindlen If the millennials seize the (election) day, they could transform the terms of American civic engagement for decades to come. Over the past decade American children have, from time to time, lined up at malls and on Main...
What Michelle Can Teach Us
Byline: Allison Samuels Forget Claire Huxtable. She could be a real-life role model for black women. Throughout this long, tense election, everyone has focused on the presidential candidates and how they'll change America. Rightly so. But selfishly,...
Where Are the Cures?
Byline: Sharon Begley Scientists call the gulf between a biomedical discovery and new treatment 'the valley of death.' It has been years since Hans Keirstead worked his biological magic, injecting stem cells into rats with severed spinal cords...
Why It's Time for a 'Green New Deal'
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Tracy McNicoll; With William Underhill in London and Jessica Ramirez in Washington, D.C. Essay: As the world faces economic turmoil, cleaner energy can create jobs and reignite global growth. In rented offices on...
Why We Need to Call a Pig a Pig (with or without Lipstick)
Byline: Jennie Yabroff We know Orwell for his novels, but it's the way he saw the politics of language that makes him relevant. In 1944, a young British writer named Eric Blair sent the publisher Jonathan Cape a manuscript for a novel-length...