Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 12, September 20

A New Weapon in the War on Terror
Byline: John Barry The land battle in Afghanistan grinds on, but the drone war is accelerating. So far this year there have been 62 reported strikes against Afghan Taliban and affiliated insurgent groups in Pakistan. This compares with 53 strikes...
A War Within
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas Robert Gates has one last, crucial mission before he leaves office, and it's not in Afghanistan or Iraq. It's in Washington--within the hallowed halls of the Pentagon. Last May, Defense Secretary Robert Gates...
Big Ben
Byline: Caryn James 'The Town' proves that Affleck is one actor-director worth his hyphen. Remember when Ben Affleck was an easy punchline, tagged with the mashup name Bennifer during his tacky, tabloid-friendly engagement to Jennifer Lopez,...
Eastern Star
Byline: Owen Matthews Turkey's prime minister has become a hero in the middle east for standing up to the west. But Islam isn't what's driving him. Gambling may be forbidden in Islam, but that hasn't kept Turkey's prime minister from being both...
Fidel Tells the Truth in Cuba
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores and Andrew Bast He has outlasted eight U.S. presidents, survived countless CIA efforts to do him in, and his communist regime has remained in power for a generation after the collapse of his Soviet sponsors. So what does...
House of Karl
Byline: Dana Thomas How much longer can Chanel's indefatigable designer keep going? Karl Lagerfeld presented his 55rd ready-to-wear collection for Chanel in March in typical over-the-top fashion. Staged at the mammoth Grand Palais in Paris, the...
How to Build a Better App
Byline: Josh Hyatt Who says America doesn't make things anymore? The U.S. market for smart-phone applications has soared past $1.5 billion, thanks to ingenious developers who pit vengeful birds against thieving green pigs, or help bowlers overanalyze...
Kitchen Monumental
Byline: Raina Kelley How Thomas Keller transformed American cuisine by combining French snobbery with a greenmarket sensibility. Once upon a time, a young chef, still reeling from a failed restaurant in New York City, found himself in beautiful...
Lost in Translation
Byline: Louisa Thomas Ishiguro wants his fiction to be unfilmable. 'Never Let Me Go' comes close to granting his wish. Never let me go takes its title from a song that Kathy H. likes to listen to as a young student at Hailsham, an unusual but...
Married to the Mob
Byline: Joshua Alston HBO is gambling on a crime drama set in New Jersey. Sound familiar? Some narratives grow so large and amass such power that they become bulletproof. Such is the case with the conventional wisdom regarding cable TV's big...
Redefining Failure
Byline: Julia Baird Maybe Willy Loman wasn't a loser. We've spent more than 60 years dissecting Willy Loman, the character artfully sketched by Arthur Miller in Death of a Salesman. Willy is, perhaps, America's consummate loser, a failure to...
Responsible Rider
Byline: Andrew Romano Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels is small, stiff, and unimposing, So why is he attracting legions of fans? Hint: it's not the motorcycle. It's lunchtime at frontier Elementary School in Brookston, Ind., and Gov. Mitch Daniels,...
Rock-Bottom Prices!
Byline: Daniel Gross How our new lowball culture is hurting the recovery. The strike of about 300 workers at a Mott's apple-juice plant in Williamson, N.Y., is nearly four months old. Union members walked off the job after Mott's parent company,...
Run of DeMille
Byline: Malcolm Jones At last, the legendary director is ready for his--well, you know. In 1926, while filming The King of Kings, director Cecil B. DeMille moved his cast and crew to Catalina Island, off the coast of California. There, while...
Shantanu Narayen: 'I Look for Passion'
Byline: Richard M. Smith The CEO of Adobe talks hiring, e-mail--and Apple. Software maker Adobe Systems Inc. is responsible for many of the big-name products in Web publishing, including Flash, Photoshop, and Acrobat. Under CEO Shantanu Narayen,...
The Trouble with Going Global
Byline: Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus American universities are eagerly recruiting foreign students and setting up outposts overseas. What's wrong with the new expansionism. Perhaps it was inevitable. Just as American businesses and banks...
We're Safer Than We Think
Byline: Fareed Zakaria But no one wants to admit it. Are we safer now than we were on 9/11? It sounds like a simple question, amenable to an answer or at least a serious conversation. But we are so polarized in America these days that it almost...
What Crisis?
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why vacancies on the bench matter. Maybe it's a failure of language. Perhaps we've been referring to it as the "judicial-vacancy crisis" for so long that nobody believes it's a crisis anymore. Maybe we should upgrade it...
What Parents Really Want
Byline: Davis Guggenheim It's not about charters vs. public schools. The director of 'Waiting for Superman' explains why. If you read the paper, there are a lot of confusing facts and opinions about education. The latest debate is about charters...
Where's the Outrage?
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores As polls show voters defecting in droves from Democrats, one bastion of support you'd think the party could count on is Hispanics. They turned out in force in 2006 and 2008 to punish Republicans for their shrill rhetoric...