Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 02, July 11

2011 Half Time Report
Earthshaking disasters, GOP chaos, a royal wedding, bin Laden's burial--and Charlie Sheen. Our tour of 2011's madcap first six months. Usually magazines wait until the end of the year before stepping back and taking stock. But this year--or the...
America's Dumbest Budget Cut
Byline: Niall Ferguson Why Republicans are wrong to put fiscal arithmetic ahead of global influence. Bring the troops home. Considering how polarized American politics is supposed to be, the consensus on this one point verges on the supernatural....
Buying Art You Can't Take Home
Byline: Blake Gopnik Are the collectors who spend thousands on conceptual works crazy--or on the cutting edge? At the Great Art Basel fair that wrapped up recently in Switzerland, you got what you paid for: $1 million bought you a sculpture of...
Daddy, Why Is My School Falling Down?
Byline: Kristen Lombardi - The Center for Public Integrity's IWatchNews The troops returning from Afghanistan this year face a bleak homecoming: the nation's commitment to their families is flagging--particularly at the broken-down schools that...
Diana at 50
Byline: Tina Brown Chilling with the Middletons. Tweeting from Davos. And still the people's princess. If not for that tragic night, what her life might look like now. After Diana's death, nine years after the car crash in the Paris tunnel, I...
Good Girl, Interrupted
Byline: Jaimie Etkin Selena Gomez has a new film and album, but her Disney image has taken a knock lately. Call it the Nutella defense. After teen star Selena Gomez was rushed to an emergency room in early June, she quickly sought to quell any...
Hit and Hacked, Sony Fights Back
Byline: Joanne Lipman CEO Howard Stringer on battling cybercrime-and taking on Apple. Sir Howard Stringer started his career as a journalist, and as he ushers me into his bookshelf-lined conference room, with its glossy table and framed photo...
Interview with Lt. Gen. David Rodriguez
Byline: Ron Moreau With President Obama revealing his plans to withdraw troops from Afghanistan, the commander of 150,000 troops talks before his own withdrawal from the front. Are the Afghan security forces and government up to the task of taking...
Lost in Afghanistan?
Byline: Stephen L. Carter Obama would rather not talk about victory. But there's no other way to assess a war. Did we win? The question came to mind after President Obama, in a prime-time -address, announced a plan to draw down American forces...
Married to the Mob
Byline: Nancy Hass Big Linda and Little Linda are living proof that the glitzy stereotypes of life in a crime family are pure fiction. Their years as girlfriend and daughter of murderous capo Greg Scarpa have left them trapped by poverty and gruesome...
My Favorite Mistake
Anthony Bourdain on the wild life that killed his culinary career. I was lucky enough to go to the Culinary Institute of America in my 20s, and my big mistake was that I was offered a chef's job very quickly after I graduated, and I took it. I did...
Obama's 2012 Game Plan
Byline: Michael Tomasky How can the president rev up and mobilize his demoralized liberal base? It was a rare confessional moment for Barack Obama. At a Miami fundraiser in mid-June, the president acknowledged that it's "not as cool" as it was...
Taming a Provocateur
Byline: Robin Givhan A Jean Paul Gaultier retrospective spans cone bras, corsets--and feminist politics. Fashion designers find inspiration in a variety of places: classical paintings, the beats of an audacious musician, or the eccentricities...
The Death of the Password
Byline: Dan Lyons Your pet's name won't get you into your email anymore. Here's how you'll protect your data online in the future. Are passwords passe? It's starting to seem like it. Everybody hates them, and nobody can remember all the ones...
The Founding Fathers, Unzipped
Byline: Simon Schama The Constitution's framers were flawed like today's politicians, so it's high time we stop embalming them in infallibility. He may have written the Declaration of Independence, but were he around today Thomas Jefferson wouldn't...
The Most Dangerous Show on Television
Byline: Andrew Romano 'Breaking Bad' is as addictive as the meth cooked by its cancer-stricken lead character, and just as insidious. It's also TV's finest hour. Bryan Cranston is Freaking me out. The skinheaded actor and I are sitting on the...
Union Jacked
Byline: Christopher Dickey A new history shows how the British almost turned the tide in the Civil War. When Americans look back on their great Civil War from 1861 to 1865, and they're doing that a lot right now, they tend to see it as exclusively...
Welfare for Dictators
Byline: Aram Roston A NEWSWEEK investigation reveals how Pentagon billions are flowing to strongmen in the Middle East. Officially, the U.S. does not pay other governments for rights to military bases. The logic is straightforward: funneling...
Where Entrepreneurs Go Shopping
Byline: Gary Rivlin A string of inventors' clubs aims to reinvigorate the spirit that shaped our economy. Between the time Apple unveiled its first iPad, in January 2010, and its release three months later, a 28-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur...
Why I'm Becoming an American
Byline: Simon Winchester Forty years ago, this country embraced a broke Brit. On July 4, I'm giving back--with the oath of citizenship. My love affair with America began with a vast disappointment, back in 1959. My father had been offered a job...