Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 06, August 8

A Dogma to Wreck the Country
Byline: Niall Ferguson It beggars belief that the GOP is willing to risk national default for the sake of antitax purity. Financial crises are complex, baffling things, but we all understand their impact on ordinary families. Take Demi and Rex....
A Full Life of Chaos and Fame
Byline: Blake Gopnik Lucian Freud, the grand old man of British art, caused a stir with his impressive portraiture. On July 20 in London, the great painter Lucian Freud passed away. He was 88 and had long since established himself as the last...
A Scandal Unfolds
Byline: Josh Dzieza May 2000 Rebekah Wade becomes editor of News of the World. January 2003 Wade becomes editor of The Sun. Her deputy, Andy Coulson, takes over NotW. November 2005 After NotW runs a story about Prince William's knee...
A Tea Party Turncoat
Byline: Peter J. Boyer A godfather of the fringe right, Sen. Tom Coburn is now paving the path to compromise. He may pay for it. For a moment, the political warfare over the debt crisis seemed to pause, and standing there bearing the flag of...
A Work of Art You Can Drive
Byline: Blake Gopnik One of the greatest rides ever, it doubles as a scupture. This time of year, fantasies turn to the open road, and convertibles: speeding to Big Sur in a '64 Mustang; taking hairpins in Vermont in a Jaguar E-Type. I have my...
Big Red Passes Buck
Byline: Clive Irving The way Rebekah Brooks told it, editing News of the World was an oddly aloof activity. Her testimony before Parliament describes a newsroom chain of command that other editors would not recognize. First, there was the money....
Citizen Rupert
Byline: Carl Bernstein Parliament's remarkable three-hour hearing on July 19, focusing on the role of Rupert Murdoch and top News International executives in the immense phone-hacking scandal, proved an epic Westminster moment. It's now possible...
David Cameron Loves a Crisis
The Murdoch scandal proves it: the prime minister is brilliant under fire--and otherwise a bit of a muddler. By Andrew Sullivan George Orwell Once said that England, "like all living things, [has] the power to change out of recognition and yet...
Deng! the True Story of Wonder Wendi
To those conditioned to think that a beautiful young woman married to a multibillionaire twice her age could be motivated only by money, Wendi Deng Murdoch--as the world now knows--has offered up a startling riposte. In an unscripted display of...
Egypt Boils Over
A NEWSWEEK/DAILY BEAST poll of Egyptian voters portends trouble for the West with this fall's elections approaching in Egypt. ARAB SPRING Resentment of the United States Egyptians rightly feel that they overthrew Hosni Mubarak on their own, and...
Interview: Juan Williams
Byline: Howard Kurtz The Fox News analyst talks about losing his NPR job, the Murdoch haters, and why he can't get a TV show. Are you still angry about being fired by NPR? I was upset at the idea of how personal it became. I felt NPR engaged...
Madman in Chief
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Was Richard Nixon too normal? Abraham Lincoln exceptionally deranged? Why we should look for a little bit of crazy in our leaders. By now, the 2012 Republican presidential contenders have all been tattooed by the opposition,...
My Favorite Mistake
Byline: Madeleine Albright Madeleine Albright on the time she stuck it to Putin. When I was America's biggest diplomat, I made a really bad mistake. This is how it happened. In 1999, President Clinton, Defense Secretary William Cohen, and...
My Favorite Summer Read-Ever
Not your typical beach reads: from Kathryn Stockett to Junot Diaz, writers pick the book that made their season. For most of us, "summer reading" is a casual shorthand for light fare, pure entertainment, even frivolity. It could be translated to...
Perspectives
Highlights from NEWSWEEK's website, thedailybeast.com ON DEBT The GOP Has Double Amnesia If the debt-ceiling negotiations reveal anything about America in 2011, it is this: we live in an age of political amnesia. From Sept. 11 to Barack Obama's...
Rupe's Hacks Dodge Flak
Byline: Geoffrey Robertson; Robertson heads the U.K.'s largest human-rights law practice. There is an Australian legend about the young Rupert Murdoch, his local newspaper, and a politician who displeased him. "Whaddaya want?" Rupert asked him....
The Bitter Dads' Club
Byline: Tony Dokoupil A new wave of burned-out fathers is coming to screens--and they're angrier than ever. American dads have never had much to complain about. For decades--make that centuries--they were one-act parents, their main physical...
The Empire Strikes Back
Byline: Howard Kurtz The inquiry was grinding on, and Rupert Murdoch looked exhausted when he had trouble remembering what he'd said when he appeared with his loyal aide Rebekah Brooks. "I walked outside my flat," Murdoch said, "and I had 20 microphones...
The Maid's Tale
Byline: Christopher Dickey & John Solomon She was paid to clean up after the rich and powerful. Then she walked into Dominique Strauss-Kahn's room--and a global scandal. Now she tells her story. "Hello? Housekeeping." The maid hovered...
The Scariest Summer
Byline: Chris Lee Parks are upping the fear factor this year with new coasters, flight simulators, and full-on vertical drops. (Bring your Pepto-Bismol.) Nothing says summer like being whipped through the air at 60 miles per hour while screaming...
The Secret-Keeper
Byline: Meryl Gordon On the eve of her 101st birthday, reclusive philanthropist Bunny Mellon, the wealthy zelig who cavorted with Kennedys and stood by John Edwards, talks exclusively to Meryl Gordon about life with Paul, her famous friends, and...
Too Proud to Be Jealous
Byline: Buck is a writer, actor, and former editor in chief of French Vogue. She was pretty and successful. He was a skirt chaser now accused of attempted rape. Why does wife Anne Sinclair put up with DSK? How French women think. By Joan Juliet...
When Dictators Shoot Back
Byline: Tahar Ben Jelloun Gaddafi and Assad are unyielding and murderous. Has the Arab Spring turned into an Arab Hell? Muammar Gaddafi and Bashar al-Assad agree on at least one point: Spring must be eliminated; the year should have just three...