Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 16

A Secret Life; Mark Foley's Explicit E-Mails Could Bring Down the GOP. His Story, and the Fallout
***** CORRECTION: CORRECTION: We erred in "A Secret Life" (Oct. 16) by reporting that a St. Petersburg Times editor said that the newspaper received inappropriate e-mails sent by Mark Foley from a source in Congressman Rodney Alexander's office....
A Smooth Ride; Thanks to Savvy Marketing and a Smart Blend of Modern Technology and Old World Craftsmanship, Bentley Is Winning the Battle of the 'Budget' Luxury Cars
Byline: Keith Naughton The rapper Xzibit made his name customizing cars. But when it came time for the host of MTV's "Pimp My Ride" to purchase his most expensive car ever, he didn't change a thing. His $200,000 gray green Bentley Continental GT...
Behind the Schemes; in 'Borat,' Sacha Baron Cohen Plays Unsuspecting Folks for Big Laughs. Meet the Real People Who Became Punch Lines
Byline: Devin Gordon He arrives at the very last second for his interviews, and he doesn't stick around afterward for small talk. As soon as the camera's off, he vanishes. "His crew wouldn't let anybody near the guy," says Jim Sell, a car salesman...
BeliefWatch: Dead Zone
Byline: Lilit Marcus and Lisa Schneider In the 1990s it was "Touched by an Angel." Then it was John Edward's "Crossing Over." Now it's the increasingly popular "Medium" and "The Ghost Whisperer." Americans have always seemed fascinated by the idea...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Memo to those who think it's OK to pay fees of 3 percent or more for tax-deferred annuities and other investments: in terms of purchasing power, those fees will eat up most--or all--of your future gains. The fees may look...
Case Study: A Standard Approach; Simple Protocols, Rigorously Followed, Make the Difference at Cooley Dickinson
Byline: Mary Carmichael It's been 124 years since caleb Cooley Dickinson, cousin of the poet Emily, endowed the hospital in Northampton, Mass., that bears his name--and he'd barely recognize the modern institution it has become. Cooley Dickinson...
Case Study: A Technology Prescription; Computerized Health Care Is Saving Money and Improving Treatment at Denver Health
Byline: Brad Stone (With Robbie Brown) If you ever have the misfortune to suffer a health crisis known as diabetic ketoacidosis, a critical state of severe high blood sugar, Denver Health hospital is one of the best places in the country to get...
Case Study: Design for a Healing Space; at Arizona's Banner Estrella Medical Center, Architects Created a Serene Ambience
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan (With Cheryl A. Sweet) With sunlight pouring in through the huge lobby windows and New Age music wafting in the background, you might think you have walked into a high-end resort hotel in the desert. Lounge areas are decorated...
Case Study: Facing Up to Mistakes; an Injured Patient and Her Doctor Help to Create Change at Brigham and Women's
Byline: Claudia Kalb Linda Kenney is an advocate for change. Born with club feet, Kenney was a hospital veteran, enduring 19 surgeries before she was admitted to Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital in November 1999. Kenney assumed her ankle-replacement...
Case Study: Fresh Ideas about Food; Local Farmers Are Supplying Strawberries, Kiwi and More to Kaiser Permanente Hospitals
Byline: Dorothy Kalins (With Karen Breslau in Oakland) Hospital food--an infelicitous term evoking gray peas, dry chicken, Jell-O--is a near oxymoron. The connection between good food and good health is so obvious it's almost not worth mentioning....
Case Study: Helping Kids in Trouble; A Rhode Island Hospital Gives Disturbed Youngsters and Their Parents Tools for a New Start
Byline: Julie Scelfo The cheerful space in Rhode Island's Bradley Hospital could easily be mistaken for a classroom. Red sweatshirts and SpongeBob backpacks fill a row of cubbies marked with construction-paper name tags. A giant schedule of the...
Case Study: New Ideas for Nurses; A Major Pittsburgh Hospital Shows How to Reinvigorate a Once Overworked Staff
Byline: Anne Underwood Which of these hospitals would you rather be treated in? At Hospital A, a major southwestern facility, the nursing staff is stretched so thin--and the intellectual and emotional demands of the job are so intense--that nurses...
Case Study: Special Care at the End of Life; Terminal Patients and Their Families Get What They Need at Mount Sinai Medical Center
Byline: David Noonan Somebody is going to have to invent a new word to describe the kinds of cases that Dr. Diane Meier deals with as head of the palliative-care program at New York's Mount Sinai Medical Center--"complicated" just doesn't get the...
Case Study: The Goal Is to Communicate; the Death of a Little Girl Leads to a New Culture of Safety and Openness at Johns Hopkins
Byline: Claudia Kalb Johns Hopkins is a world leader in medicine. So when Sorrel and Tony King found themselves there in 2001 with their 18-month-old daughter, Josie, they were grateful. Josie had climbed into a bathroom tub, turned on the hot water...
Death Squads Online; as If Things Weren't Bad Enough, Now Iraq's Sectarian Butchers Are Posting Their Execution Lists on the Internet
Byline: Christian Caryl and Michael Hastings Not long ago, Mohammed Kika found out that his name had appeared on a London-based Web site run by Sunni exiles from Iraq. The Baghdad man was accused of betraying other Sunnis to a Shiite militia in...
Digital Age: Next: Paperless Medicine
Byline: David W. Bates, M.D., and Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D. (Bates and Komaroff are professors at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. For more information go to health.harvard.edu.) If you're a patient, there are many things...
Disclose, Apologize, Explain
Byline: Lucian Leape, M.D. (Leape is adjunct professor of health policy at the Harvard School of Public Health. For more information, go to health.harvard.edu.) Progress is being made in reducing medical mistakes, but we're never going to abolish...
Don't Get Excited. It's Just the Dow
Byline: Allan Sloan Have you recovered yet from celebrating the Dow's reaching record highs last week? Hope you didn't go too wild. Hangovers can be so nasty--though it sure was fun watching folks on the New York Stock Exchange floor whoop it up...
Family Travel: Make Way for Toddlers
Byline: Paul Tolme Lisa Sladkus gets the same question each time she tells friends she's taking her toddlers skiing: "Are you crazy?" The thought of a ski vacation with young children might evoke visions of temper tantrums and hazardous wipeouts....
Fast Chat: Fiorina's 'Choices'
Byline: Brad Stone Carly Fiorina says she wrote her memoir, "Tough Choices," to share lessons from her 25 years in business, first at AT&T and then as CEO of Hewlett-Packard--not to settle scores. But the HP board members who ousted her in 2005...
Fixing America's Hospitals; No Institution Is Doing Everything Right. but We Found 10 That Are Using Innovation, Hard Work and Imagination to Improve Care, Reduce Errors and Save Money. Fresh Fruit and Digital Record-Keeping, Anyone?
Byline: Claudia Kalb Every day, hospitals across the country care for Americans in need. Babies are born, heart-attack victims are saved, broken bones are healed. But today, as the population ages, medical demands surge and costs rise, America's...
For the Faithful, A Trying Time
Byline: Howard Fineman In Florida, you drive North to reach the South. The "I-4 Corridor" is a Mason-Dixon Line in reverse. I crossed it the other day headed north out of bland, Disney-fied Orlando on a state road with four numerals--past the BBQ...
Get Well Safely; A Hospital Can Be Scarier Than the Problem That Sends You There. What to Look out For
Byline: Eric Schneider; Schneider is associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Readers should consult a medical professional for an accurate diagnosis. West Palm Beach, Fla.: Where can I get accurate information on the safety of...
Hockey: Frozen-Solid Fans
Byline: Nick Summers In November 2004, pro hockey was on the brink of disaster. The lockout that would eventually cancel the 2004-05 season was one month old, and as players and owners waited out the billion-dollar staredown, the worst part was...
Invasive Procedures: Less Is More ... and Better
Byline: Donald M. Berwick, M.D. (Berwick is clinical professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and CEO of the Institute for HealthcareImprovement.) The modern hospital is the cathedral of our time--gleaming, mystical,...
Iraq's Dark Day of Reckoning; If You Were a Shiite, Having Suffered through a Brutal Insurgency and an Incompetent Government, Would You Give Up Your Weapons?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria When Iraq's current government was formed last April, after four months of bitter disputes, wrangling and paralysis, many voices in America and in Iraq said the next six months would be the crucial testing period. That was...
I Think, Therefore I Am Misunderstood; Sure, It Looks like I'm Getting Money for Nothing, but as a Philosopher, I Do More Than You Think
Byline: Erik Wielenberg I mean, what do you do ?" it's the question every professional philosopher dreads. Most of us first face it as undergraduate philosophy majors, when it's put this way: "I mean, what are you going to do with that?" I wonder...
Make the Most of Mealtime
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Think that eating lunch at your desk makes you more productive? Not necessarily. "What you can accomplish in an hour at a business lunch more than compensates for the work you could have done at the office," says Robin Jay....
Making Pain Care a Priority; New Standards Take the Hurt out of Healing at Virginia Mason Medical Center
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Last summer, when Jack Stuckrath learned that he needed surgery to remove part of his esophagus, the Seattle store owner tried not to worry about the pain that would surely follow. It seemed a small price to pay for the...
Newsmakers
Byline: Jac Chebatoris Q &A: Brandon Flowers The multiplatinum Killers just released a new CD, "Sam's Town." Lead singer Brandon Flowers talked to Jac Chebatoris. Your last record, "Hot Fuss," sold millions. Are you feeling any pressure?...
Nursing Education: Training on the Fast Track
Byline: Elissa Curtis What does it take to be a well-trained nurse? The answer used to be two-year associate's or four-year bachelor's degree programs. But as the nursing shortage deepens, a growing number of schools and hospitals are establishing...
Olympics: Will Doha Get the Gold?
Byline: Nick Summers Is the world ready for a Mideast Olympics? While there are no formal campaigns until after the 2014 Winter Games are announced next July, Doha, Qatar, is weighing a bid for the 2016 Summer Games. Speculation about the capital...
One Rich Ragtop; in a Test-Drive, the Bentley Continental GTC Works Its Magic on an Old Detroit Hand. A Perfect Blend of Man and Machine
Byline: Keith Naughton As the sun sets on Golden Vineyards in Napa Valley, I wind my way through mountain switchbacks and become lost. And I couldn't care less. I'm too enthralled by the power and the glory that is the Bentley Continental GTC. At...
Perfect Is Possible; Pilot Projects at Hundreds of Hospitals around the Country Prove That Medical Error Rates Can Be Reduced to Zero
Byline: Donald M. Berwick, M.D., and Lucian L. Leape, M.D. (Berwick and Leape are members of the Harvard faculty. Berwick is CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), and Leape is Adjunct Professor of Health Policy at the Harvard School...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: New York Times, CBS News, New York Times, Associated Press (3), Reuters (2) New York Daily News (2) "We are not going to live with a nuclear North Korea." Christopher R. Hill , U.S. assistant secretary of State for...
Reversal of Fortune; Short-Term Money Isn't Supposed to Yield More Than Long-Term Investments. but Some Money-Market Mutual Funds Are Topping 30-Year Treasury Securities. Huh?
Byline: Allan Sloan We all know there's no such thing as a free lunch. But every once in a while, you may think you see one. So what do you do? Answer: check carefully to find the price--because there always is one. Today's case in point: money-market...
Sky-High Map Guys; Google Earth Brought Satellite Photography to the Masses. as Competitors Try to Catch Up, the Old Business of Aerial Mapping Is Taking off in the Internet Age
Byline: Brad Stone If you were in Los Angeles recently and noticed a twin-engine Cessna Turbo 310 crisscrossing the sky in meticulously parallel lines, several times a day for more than a week, you were probably watching one of Ken Potter's airplanes....
Sticking to the Business; Jake Winebaum Rode the Boom and Weathered the Bust. Now He's Focusing on Work-Dot-Com Style
Byline: Steven Levy While some entrepreneurs in the current boom are proving that there are second acts in America, others are quietly proving that the first act isn't over. Case in point: Jake Winebaum. After starting Disney's first big Web effort,...
The Clinic: A No-Spin Zone; It's the Determination to Stay within the Zone of Privacy That Has Made Abortion an Easy Mark for Cheap Mythology and Easy Demonization
Byline: Anna Quindlen For anyone who has spent a lifetime listening to the bumper-sticker rhetoric of abortion politics, hearing Renee Chelian describe how she does things at the Michigan clinics she oversees is, no question, a shock to the system....
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham A decade ago, my wife and I spent a long, lovely--and, if memory serves, rather liquid--evening in Atlanta with Bill Emerson, a charming bear of a man who had covered the civil-rights movement for NEWSWEEK. Emerson was full of...
The Scissor Sisters; Can Three Siblings Create a Fashion Empire out of Whole Cloth?
Byline: Sarah Childress It's not a stretch to say Samantha, Caillianne and Chloe Beckerman live for fashion. Their Manhattan apartment is crammed with garment racks and the coffee table is littered with sketches and fabric swatches. This is where...
The Worrying Housing Bust; If Home Prices Drop Too Much, the Damage to Consumer Confidence and Spending Won't Be Easily Offset. the Danger: A 2007 Recession
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We are at the endgame for housing. Until recently, our national motto has been "in real estate we trust." Just last week, the Census Bureau reported that median home prices after inflation rose 32 percent from 2000 to...
Tragedy in Amish Country; A Brutal Pennsylvania Slaying Brought Together Neighbors Who Live Worlds Apart
Byline: Susannah Meadows (With Sarah Childress) In his years as a taxi driver, Bob Potts had driven his "FriendlyTransportation" cab all around his home of Lancaster County, Pa. The Amish weren't among his regular customers. When they couldn't walk,...
Why Pyongyang May Test Its Bomb
Byline: Michael Hirsh, Mark Hosenball and Melinda Liu East Asia could be on the verge of the nightmare it has been trying to avert for so long: a North Korean nuclear test that could set off a destabilizing WMD arms race in that part of the world....