Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 6

A Centurion's E-Mails; through the Eyes of a Frontline Fighter: The Marine Captain Asked for a Tougher Assignment. the One He Got Seemed All but Impossible
Byline: Dan Ephron and Christian Caryl (With Lee Hudson Teslik and Sarah Childress in New York) Robert Secher had a passion for history. Until his death in Iraq on Oct. 8, the 33-year-old Marine could recount all the major battles of the Civil War....
A Sacred Mission; the Uphill Battle to Save Our Old Houses of Worship
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan This week, the 200-year-old neoclassical Baltimore Basilica will reopen its weighty oak doors after a two-year, $32 million face-lift. The restoration of America's first Roman Catholic cathedral is a triumph for preservationists,...
As Kids Grow, So Do Risks
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn, Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld Young adulthood isn't what it used to be. Children tend to linger. They're staying in college longer, often taking five or six years to finish. They're boomeranging home after graduation...
Back to the Future; How Do You Save a Franchise That's Getting a Little Long in the Tooth? Press the REBOOT Button and Start the Story Again from Scratch
Byline: Devin Gordon You can always tell the precise moment when a big movie franchise goes completely off the rails. It's never subtle. When George Clooney showed up with nipples on his Batsuit, it was all over. Or when Rocky settled the cold war....
BeliefWatch: Spirit Filled
Byline: Lisa Miller What does it mean to speak in tongues? And who has the right, or the privilege, to do so? These questions, largely theological, have lingered at the fringes of American Protestantism. Now, as charismatic Christianity sweeps the...
Coca-Cola's Holy Grail; Stolen Trade Secrets, Two Guilty Pleas and a Pending Trial Raise Questions about an Old Soft-Drink Legend
Byline: Jessica Ramirez With Catharine Skipp In a vault in the bowels of a SunTrust Bank in Atlanta lies one of the most sacred secrets in the business world: the 120-year-old formula for Coca-Cola. That is the one certainty about the mysterious...
Diller Weaves a Web; He Bought Ask.com Not Just to Get into the Search Game, but to Integrate His $20 Billion Web Portfolio
Byline: Brad Stone The quarterly meetings of execs at Internet conglomerate IAC/InterActiveCorp are a bit like the first day of classes at a strict, strange prep school. Twenty-three CEOs of IAC subsidiaries like Match.com, Citysearch, Ticketmaster...
Execution: What Happens After?
Byline: Lynn Waddell and Arian Campo-Flores The families of Danny Rolling's murder victims filed into the execution viewing room in Starke, Fla., last week. The curtains were pulled back, and there he lay on a gurney, a leather strap across his...
Extreme Makeovers; in Virginia, Three Elite Women's Colleges Reinvent Themselves and Find a New Mission in a Coed World
Byline: Julie Scelfo with Amanda Milner-Fairbanks Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., looks like the Hollywood version of an idyllic Southern campus. Pale yellow buildings with white columns surround a rolling, green lawn. But inside the Umoja...
Fashion: Growing Manes
Byline: Meghan McCain Once a well-kept secret among Hollywood divas, hair extensions have stepped into the spotlight. Unlike wigs, which cover your hair, extensions clip or bond onto your own strands to add fullness and length without hiding your...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Marc Peyser Q&A: Roseanne Roseanne is back with a one-hour comedy special on HBO. She spoke with Nicki Gostin. You talk a lot about aging in your act. I'm trying to get comfortable with aging. It's hard. Reality...
OK, Sister, Drop That Sandwich! Cities Fight Panhandling by Outlawing Food Giveaways in Parks
Byline: Matthew Philips Walking around downtown Orlando, Fla., feels like strolling through "The Truman Show" 's fictional town of Seahaven. But spotless sidewalks, a tidy business district, lush parks and lakes belie a real city with real problems,...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: New York Times, The Washington Post, Daily Mail, AP, The Washington Post, AP (2), Fox, Orlando Sentinel, Dallas Morning News "No one has the right to set a timetable." Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, initially...
Plotting Pluto's Comeback; Some Astronomers Want to Reclaim the Status of Planet for the Distant Ball of Rock and Ice
Byline: Jerry Adler To Bob Millis, director of the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz., Pluto is still the ninth planet, no matter what the International Astronomical Union chooses to call it. It was Lowell's founder and namesake, Percival Lowell,...
Politics: The Sleepers; Iraq Weighs on Voters' Minds, but a Set of Wedge Issues Could Help Tip the Scales
Byline: Jonathan Darman with Lee Hudson Teslik, Debra Rosenberg, Arian Campo-Flores with Jim Moscou in Colorado, Karen Breslau with Debra Rosenberg in Washington and Bill Harlan ins Sioux Falls All politics is local, except when it isn't. Next week...
Positively Broadway; When Twyla Met Bob: A Fascinating Train Wreck?
Byline: David Gates Many people who revere Bob Dylan already know what they think of the Broadway musical "The Times They Are A-Changin'." Granted, it was Dylan who approached the choreographer Twyla Tharp after her hit show with Billy Joel's songs--but...
Putting Detroit in the Shop; American Automakers Have to Move Faster to Make Cars Americans Will Actually Buy
Byline: Keith Naughton Bob Wiley has always driven Detroit iron. So when the 62-year-old retired Air Force man decided this year to trade in his Ford pickup truck for a more comfortable car, he test-drove Ford and Buick sedans. But he was turned...
Rethinking Iraq: The Way Forward; the Drawdown Option: It Is Past Time to Confront Reality. to Avoid Total Defeat, We Must Reduce and Redeploy Our Troops and Nudge the Iraqis toward a Deal. Here's How
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (With Michael Hastings in Baghdad) BY 1952, the last year of his presidency, Harry Truman recognized that the victory he had hoped for was no longer possible in Korea. U.S. forces were not losing, but they were not winning,...
The Big Value of Small Increases
Byline: Allan Sloan; Correction: Harris Associates doesn't run a London-based fund of hedge funds, as I wrote last week. It's run by Harris Alternatives, which split off in 2003. When Social Security announced its latest cost-of-living increases,...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham On a Saturday in mid-October, Air Force Airman 1/c Lee Bernard Emmanuel Chavis--he was Lee to friends, and "Nard" to family--was on patrol with the 824th Security Forces Squadron in Iraq. It was Chavis's second tour of duty;...
The Officer's Pledge: To Serve and Deflect? I'm Just One Proud Police Officer. Please Don't Hold Me Accountable for the Behavior of All Other Cops
Byline: Kristen Roman (Roman lives in Madison, Wis.) On a recent evening, as I walked with my 5-year-old son into the park near our home, I encountered one of our neighbors. I don't know him that well, but I have seen him in the park many times...
Togetherness in Baghdad; A Surreal Facet of the Iraq Fiasco Is the Lag between When a Fact Becomes Obvious and When the Fiasco's Architects Acknowledge It
Byline: George F. Will Many months ago it became obvious to all but the most ideologically blinkered that America is losing the war launched to deal with a chimeric problem (an arsenal of WMD) and to achieve a delusory goal (a democracy that would...
Visions of Hell; Two Yale Grads and a Colorado Pastor Team Up to Present a Demonic Version of a Haunted House
Byline: Matthew Philips and Lisa Miller Worlds collided last month in Brooklyn. In a dark neighborhood of warehouses called DUMBO, in a theater usually reserved for edgy bands and performance artists, real actors performed, straight up and without...
Women on the Verge; Almodovar and Cruz Make 'Volver' a Quirky Triumph
Byline: David Ansen Pedro Almodovar's latest film includes child abuse, murder, cancer, a corpse stashed in a freezer, a ghost and a village obsessed with the dead--in other words, it's one of his most benign movies. That's the wonderful paradox...