Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 23, December 3

A Director Confronts Some Dark Material
Byline: Devin Gordon Daunted by filming 'The Golden Compass,' part one of Philip Pullman's fantasy trilogy, Chris Weitz quit. Good thing he came back. Chris Weitz likes to say that he is both the first and the third director of "The Golden Compass,"...
AIDS and the Pastor's Wife
Byline: Lisa Miller 'I always say, "Before marriage, opposites attract. After marriage, opposites attack",' Rick Warren says with a laugh. You might think of this week as Kay Warren's coming-out party. Her husband, Rick, who is perhaps the most...
A Man out of Step with His Country
Ian Smith, 88, Politician For 15 turbulent years, Smith led the British colony of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) as its prime minister and last colonial leader. He died last week after a massive stroke. F. W. de Klerk, the former South African president...
A New French Revolution
Byline: Fareed Zakaria This could be the start of Europe's biggest turnaround since Thatcher revived Britain. You can measure the change in France by the use of prefixes. Ten years ago, the French railed against American "hyperpower." They played...
A New Shot at History
Byline: Martha Brant And Stuart Taylor Jr. The high court will soon examine D.C.'s handgun ban. In the meantime, life on the street carries on. Washington, D.C., has the toughest gun-control laws in the country. For 31 years, it has been illegal...
A Stunning Sex Scene -- with No Sex
Byline: David Ansen The most erotically charged movie scene I've encountered recently occurs about 30 minutes into "Starting Out in the Evening," a small independent movie by director Andrew ("The Talent Given Us") Wagner. It's not a sex scene,...
Bankrolling Ali's Asylum
Byline: Jerry Adler Ayaan Hirsi Ali stands at the nexus of forces shaping the 21st century -- and it's a very dangerous place to be. The Somali-born author, who repudiated traditional Islam in her best-selling memoir, "Infidel," fled her adopted...
Barack Strikes Back
Byline: Richard Wolffe He's still a little uneasy pursuing politics as a game, played to win. But Obama is suiting up now. Two months ago, Barack Obama traveled to Ashford University in Eastern Iowa to spell out exactly how he would bring troops...
Ben & Jerry's Bitter Crunch
Byline: Suzanne Smalley Some ailing franchisees say the ice-cream maker isn't nearly as sweet as its image. Rainforest Crunch. Cherry Garcia. Peace Pops. Perhaps no other consumer brand's image is so entwined with hippie-inspired idealism and...
Bracing for the Gender Neutral Test
Byline: Andrew Romano For Hillary Clinton, a funny thing has happened on the way to the Democratic nomination: one of her biggest potential handicaps -- her gender -- has become her biggest strength. Seeking to "smash" what she calls "the highest...
China's African Misadventures
Byline: Scott Johnson Beijing has dramatically outpaced its rivals in Africa. But at ground level, things don't always look so rosy. The town of Catumbela, in Central Angola, sits on a sprawling, fertile plateau planted with plantains and mangos....
Growing Up Giuliani
Byline: Evan Thomas And Suzanne Smalley; With Michael Isikoff, Arian Campo-Flores, Lisa Miller And Mark Hosenball Rudy Giuliani was raised to understand that fine, blurry line between saint and sinner. The making of his moral code. On Sept. 16,...
How No. 1s Pick No. 2s
Byline: George F. Will Seriously, now: Have you ever met anyone who voted for a presidential candidate because of his running mate? A high-priced lawyer, a low-priced lawyer and the tooth fairy are sitting at a table on which rests a $100 bill....
In the Mideast, Giving Peace (Another) Chance
Byline: Dan Ephron Israelis and Palestinians have always been better at making peace-deal promises than following through on them. As the latest peace conference gets underway this week in Annapolis, Md., Palestinians are pressing Washington to...
Love, Loss -- and Love
Byline: Karen Springen The death of a young child can devastate a family. How couples decide they're ready to try again. Two years ago, 5-month-old Cody Schmurr died from multiple congenital myopathy -- a rare condition that made his muscles...
Makeover for A Motor City Gem
Byline: Cathleen Mcguigan The reopened Detroit Institute of Arts didn't just get a face-lift. It got an attitude adjustment for the 21st century. When you get off the freeway and head toward the Detroit Institute of Arts, you first notice the...
Messiah on A Hill
Byline: Kevin Peraino Billionaire Munib al-Masri looks to capitalize on Palestinian anger. By car they're only 15 minutes apart, but you can't get much further from the West Bank's desperate refugee camps than the summit of Mount Gerizim, on...
Murder Most Wired
Byline: Barbie Nadeau and Christopher Dickey; With Jessica Au in London Police in Italy have turned to the Web to unravel a gruesome and heartbreaking homicide mystery. Late on the morning of Nov. 2, in the Italian city of Perugia, an elderly...
Not Ready for Crunch Time
Byline: David Ansen In "The Savages," writer-director Tamara Jenkins tackles a subject everybody deals with and filmmakers tend to shy away from: that painful role reversal when a child has to become an aging parent's parent. As anyone who saw her...
Perspectives
"I had unknowingly passed along false information. And five of the highest-ranking officials in the administration were involved in my doing so." Former White House spokesperson Scott McClellan, in his forthcoming memoir, in which he appears to...
Reality Check on an Embryonic Debate
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Jeneen Interlandi So skin cells can turn into stem cells. That doesn't mean cures are in sight. When President George W. Bush vetoed Congress's latest stem-cell bill in June, he tried to soften the blow and minimize...
Reclaiming My Voice
Byline: John Fogerty After Creedence broke up, the musician spent years searching for his own sound. With love, he found it. My new album, "Revival," comes by its title naturally -- a return to making the kind of music I became known for early...
Smile! You're on Camera
Byline: Jessica Bennett The average American is caught on tape some 200 times a day, but for many of us the notion that we're being watched -- at all times -- has yet to sink in. That's what makes Adam Rifkin's acclaimed new film, "Look," so shocking....
The Case for Facing Facts
Why we need to acknowledge that the news from Iraq has been getting better I have been troubled by the reluctance of my fellow liberals to acknowledge the progress made in Iraq in the last six months, a reluctance I am embarrassed to admit that...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Brother Peter Bonventre was an assistant principal at Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School in Brooklyn in the years its most notable alumnus, Rudy Giuliani, studied there. Nearly 50 years on, Brother Peter is a guidance counselor...
The 'Geo-Engineering' Scenario
Byline: Sharon Begley We may soon become desperate to turn down the thermostat faster than reducing CO2 emissions can. After decades spent studying volcanoes, Alan Robock can list 20 reasons why humans should not try to play god with the world's...
The Mind-Body Problem
Byline: David Ansen The hero of 'The Diving Bell and the Butterfly' can move only one eye -- but he sure does get around. Jean-Dominique Bauby, the sybaritic, sophisticated, womanizing editor of French Elle, was 43 when he suffered a massive...
There's No Place like -- Iraq?
Byline: Larry Kaplow, Rod Nordland And Silvia Spring Actually, yes. Refugees are returning -- but it's tough to resettle them without worsening sectarian divisions. Dawood is happy to be back in Baghdad. Not that he had much choice. Late last...
The Ring and I, Analyzed
Byline: N'Gai Croal What do our phones say about us? If you use a blackberry, does that mean you're a round-the-clock workaholic? If you have an iPhone, are you an artsy type who flits from one distraction to another? What does it say when you own...
The Season to Be Wary
Byline: Linda Stern It's a tough year to be a toy-buying parent. In recent months, almost 25 million mostly Chinese-made toys have been recalled because they have dangerous amounts of lead or magnets -- which can cause intestinal damage when swallowed...
The Sermon on the Mall
Byline: Daniel Gross The Christmas season brings out the gleeful child in adults. At dusk, harried midtown Manhattan office workers pause to gaze in delight at the Saks window displays. After Thanksgiving, world-weary grumbling gives way to sincere...
When 'Goodbye' Is A Click Away
Byline: Jackie Lee Thomas; Thomas Lives In Mt. Pleasant, Pa. Ready to start dating again, I decided to try out the Internet. But I discovered it was easy come, easy go. After the end of an 18-year relationship, the last thing I wanted was a date....
Where Are the Monks?
Byline: Lennox Samuels The junta has jailed some of Burma's Buddhist clergy, derobed others and driven many into exile. The 26-year-old monk was one of thousands who took to Burma's streets in late September. Like so many of them he had never...