Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 154, No. 13, September 28

A Dialogue on Race?
Byline: Po Bronson And Ashley Merryman an update to our sept. 14 cover story How our piece on babies and discrimination became ammunition for Rush Limbaugh. New social science suggests that parents and educators need to preach racial tolerance...
A Return to Reality
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Missile defense wasn't the answer. By canceling plans to station antiballistic-missile systems in Poland and the Czech Re-public, President Obama has traded fantasy for reality. Keep in mind a few facts about missile defense....
Attack of the Drones
Byline: Fred Kaplan; Kaplan is the National-Security Columnist for Slate and the author of 1959: The Year Everything Changed. Now that congress has killed the F-22, the Air Force is facing another shock to the system: planes without pilots. For...
Buckle Up-Or Else
Byline: Jacob Weisberg A kinder, gentler paternalism. Last week dawned clear and bright in the nanny state of New York City. Monday's paper brought word that the city's new health commissioner was working on ways to get residents to exercise...
Copenhagen or Bust
Byline: Gordon Brown; Brown is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The time is now for an international deal on climate change. In just 11 weeks, the world will convene in Copenhagen, under the auspices of the United Nations, to forge a...
Defending the Chief
Byline: Allison Samuels When the House of Representatives made the unusual move to pass a "resolution of disapproval" against Joe Wilson after his outburst during the president's speech on health care, it was House Majority Whip James Clyburn of...
Don't Tweet on Me
Byline: Daniel Lyons Twitter shows that stupid stuff sells. The comedian Dane Cook apparently believes he is building his brand by pumping out a steady stream of comments on Twitter, the microblogging site that lets you broadcast 140-character...
Isabella Rossellini
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh What turns Isabella Rossellini on? Sex--specifically animal sex. Green Porno, her series of short movies about the sex lives of animals, is featured on the Sundance Channel and has now been adapted into a book. She spoke to...
Magical History Tour
Byline: William Underhill For the middle-aged pilgrim, the trail is well marked. Stroll west from Liverpool's Central railway station and you're soon in the "Beatles Quarter." There's the site of the Cavern Club, the sweaty dive where the Fab Four...
Not-So-Special Forces
Byline: Mark Hosenball Some U.S. special forces in Afghanistan and Pakistan may be at higher risk than usual of injury and death because the Pentagon has not equipped their units with enough helicopters to transport them safely around the countries,...
Play the Race Card
Byline: Raina Kelley Why avoiding the issue doesn't help. Let me say this clearly so there are no misunderstandings: some of the protests against President Obama are howls of rage at the fact that we have an African-American head of state. I'm...
Something Wilder
Byline: Jeremy McCarter When Thornton Wilder wore his glasses, which was much of the time, he had a mild, professorial air--like an owl, some said. Catch him without spectacles, though, and the change was extreme. His blue eyes had what one reporter...
Surviving Swine Flu
Byline: Laurie Garrett; Garrett is A senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. As I type these words my brain is swarming with mind-twisting immune-system chemicals called cytokines: I am in day six of the swine flu. Yes, I wrote The Coming...
Taliban 2.0 in Pakistan
Byline: Haider Ali Hussein Mullick The Taliban is on the run in northern Pakistan. Thanks to the latest military campaign, by the end of summer the Islamists had lost territory, public support, and their firebrand leader, Baitullah Mehsud. The bickering...
The China Conundrum
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Using tires to send a message. For years, U.S. presidents have faced a China conundrum: how to deal with a country that has predatory trade practices without unleashing worldwide protectionism? President Obama's recent...
The Greenest Big Companies in America
Byline: Daniel McGinn When David Roberts was growing up near the oilfields of West Texas in the early 1960s, it never got dark. Back then, oilfields were lit 24/7 by the gas flares used to burn off natural gas, a byproduct of oil drilling. The flares...
The Jackass-Reduction Plan
Byline: Jonathan Alter Open primaries are step No. 1. It's enough to make me nostalgic for Jackass, the MTV show of a decade ago. At least the yokels performing those stupid stunts were trying to hurt themselves, not act like jerks toward someone...
What Alters Our Genes
Byline: Sharon Begley Was a 'fraud' really a discovery? For a time, it was the most famous fraud in biology. From 1906 to 1923, Austrian biologist Paul Kammerer reported remarkable results in experiments with the midwife toad. Highly unusual...
Words Have Consequences
Byline: Jon Meacham The wars of the Obama presidency--the tea parties, the heckling, the charges of racism--are covered breathlessly, but they are, sadly, all too familiar. Controversial presidents have always inspired epic love and epic hate; Jefferson,...