Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 16, October 17

A Dream for My Daughter
Byline: Nadia Al-Sakkaf Where the explosions she hears are fireworks, not gunfire. Fighting has escalated in Yemen since the return in late September of the badly wounded President Ali Abdullah Saleh, ready, he says, to cede power. Nadia Al-Sakkaf,...
A Legacy of Hope
Byline: Lois Romano Gabriel Time hails from Wyoming. The 23-year-old senior airman had been in Afghanistan for only a day or two this past January when he went looking for support. Time found his way to the USO center in Kandahar. He didn't need...
Behind Obama's Populist Makeover
Byline: Howard Kurtz The president's friends (and foes) on what prompted his lurch to the left--and whether it will work. The populist reincarnation of President Obama since Labor Day--with his stinging attacks on tax-coddled millionaires, corporate-jet...
Color and Chaos in Paris
Byline: Robin Givhan Balenciaga's splashy spring collection brightens a day of surprises. As even the most casual consumer of popular culture knows, the fashion world, at its white-hot core, remains an old-fashioned hierarchy--and nowhere is...
Come on in, the Water's Fine
Byline: Bryan Curtis Never mind the beheadings, the kidnappings, the mass graves. Mexico wants its tourists back. One warm, sunny spring day, I check into Los Flamingos, a pink stucco hotel that sprawls across a cliffside in Acapulco. Los Flamingos...
Interview : Steve Inskeep
Byline: Nick Summers The NPR Morning Edition host talks about Pakistan, the subject of his new book, and why some people might find him annoying. What drew you to Pakistan and Karachi, the country's booming city of 13 million? It began as a...
Investment Pieces for Lean Times
Byline: Blake Gopnik Don't spend the recession staring at bare walls. For the price of a power boat, you can own a great work of art--and it's safer than the stock market. They say that, in uncertain times, small-time investors should stick to...
Jon Stewart, Live at the USO
Byline: Christopher Buckley How America's most scathing liberal war critic ended up at the bedside of wounded warriors--and as outraged as ever. A few days before I spoke with Jon Stewart about his USO tour in Afghanistan, Bob Hope's widow, Dolores,...
Master of Malice
Byline: Jacob Bernstein Frank Langella is back as a lying, cheating scoundrel--and loves it. Six years ago, then known primarily as the man who'd once been Dracula, Frank Langella was weighing three offers--two TV shows and a tiny new play with...
My Favorite Mistake
Chef Jose Andres on getting kicked out of the kitchen. It was December 1990, And I was 21 years old, working in a restaurant outside Barcelona for my best friend, Ferran Adria. Now he's known as the best chef in the world, but back then we were...
Surviving Clarence
Byline: Leslie Bennetts Twenty years after the Clarence Thomas hearings--and a year after Thomas's wife left her a message--Anita Hill isn't giving an inch. On a balmy Indian-summer afternoon in Waltham, Mass., a slender, attractive 55-year-old...
The Coffee Shop Baby
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Meet a 'donorsexual' on the web--and he'll service you anywhere. For months, Beth Gardner and her wife, Nicole, had been looking for someone to help them conceive. They began with sperm banks, which have donors of almost...
Wanted: A New Messiah
Byline: Andrew Romano Who best fits the radical mold of Reagan and FDR--and why can't we find them? On Sept. 27, the governor of New Jersey gave a speech. Normally this wouldn't be a big deal: there'd be a press release from Trenton, a segment...
What Happens If Chris Christie Gets In?
Byline: David A. Graham A snapshot of how the New Jersey governor is roiling the presidential landscape. Oh, hi! AApparently, I actually have to commit suicide to convince people I'm not running.A --One of Christie's many unheeded denials...
Why Is This Guy Smiling?
Byline: Robin Marantz Henig In our era of wars, genocide, and terrorism, Steven Pinker says we're more peaceful than ever. Steven Pinker is the very model of a modern intellectual. Since the 1994 publication of his first bestseller, The Language...
World on Wi-Fire
Byline: Niall Ferguson Feel the chaos? Technology is feeding mind-boggling volatility everywhere. The human race is interconnected as never before. Is that a good thing? Ask the Lords of the Internet--the men running the companies Eric Schmidt...