Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 159, No. 07, February 13

A Dickens for Our Times
Byline: Simon Schama The novelist made masterpieces out of modern cruelties. Two dundred years on from his birth, how close is Charles Dickens to you? Do Pip and Peggotty, Carton and Copperfield, Pumblechook, Squeers, and Creakle have a place...
Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles: Budget Hawks
Byline: Eleanor Clift The deficit continues to climb. Obama ignored the two men who tried to stop it. Alan Simpson And Erskine Bowles When it comes to taking stands that are bound to anger people, former senator Alan Simpson has little competition....
An Ode to 'Good Eats'
Byline: Laura M. Colarusso Tv's smartest chef, Alton Brown, is ending his blockbuster show after more than a decade. A history of his unlikely hit. Before Giada, Guy, and Ina, there was Alton Brown. The creator and host of Good Eats, Food Network's...
Cash Cloud
Byline: Dan Lyons Forget Facebook: Workday may be Silicon Valley's next big IPO. Everybody's talking about Facebook's initial public offering, but unless you're Warren Buffett, you're probably better off looking for a sleeper among the lesser-known...
Christophobia
Byline: Ayaan Hirsi Ali From one end of the muslim world to the other, Christians are being murdered for their faith. We hear so often about Muslims as victims of abuse in the West and combatants in the Arab Spring's fight against tyranny. But,...
Dude Is a Rock Star
Byline: Chris Lee Gustavo Dudamel is the Elvis of the orchestra world, and he has the sold-out concerts to prove it. Meet the L.A. Philharmonic conductor who's bridging the generation gap--and saving classical music. Gustavo Dudamel explodes...
From the Wrap Dress to Grunge
Byline: Robin Givhan Fashion designers pick their most iconic contributions to American culture. Grunge. Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy's wedding gown. The wrap dress. All inventions that changed the fashion industry and resonated throughout the culture....
Hunted in Alabama
Byline: Patrick Symmes The state is driving out its illegal immigrants. Businesses want them back. Meet the men and women in the middle. The front door is locked on this brown-and-cream mobile home, an aluminum outpost at the end of a pine-tree...
My Favorite Mistake
Michael Kors on the dangers of snappy underwear. When I first ventured into menswear, it was fall 1991. My very first show was at Grand Central Terminal in New York, which is not exactly a private venue. I knew that the collection had to be exciting...
My Life with Trig
Byline: Sarah Palin He's nearing his fourth birthday. He has Down Syndrome. And he greets every day with a round of applause. Last week, Rick Santorum and his family offered us a reminder of what really matters. When his 3-year-old daughter,...
Namaste, Starbucks
Byline: Sunit Arora The coffee king has set its sights on India. A decade after it started sourcing coffee from India, Starbucks, the world's largest coffee chain, has decided to serve up its concoctions to an Indian audience. It's been a while...
Newt's Days of Rage
Byline: Lloyd Grove He's been buried by an avalanche of attack ads, and outspent 5-1. That's when Speaker Gingrich is at his most dangerous. In the bunker with 2012's comeback kid. Newt Gingrich insists he's not angry. He's disappointed, certainly,...
Periscope
Bare your fangs. But Don't Bite Poor Immigrants. Ugly, noisy primary fights are such a boon to American democracy. The venom, the scrutiny, and the cash, hurled in great big gobs of defamation, finally break down candidates to the point where they...
Save the Journalists! (or Not)
Byline: Howard Kurtz A New Model for Doing Good When Bill Gates was unveiling his dazzling, high-ceilinged visitors' center in Seattle last week, I asked him about a framed newspaper clipping on the wall. He recalled reading the 1997 New York...
The Endorsement Racket
Byline: Paul Begala So Trump's placed his chips on Mitt, and Cain's gone for Newt. But will it change a single vote? We can all go home now. No more need for primaries or caucuses or voting. The Donald has decided the election for us. America's...
The Eve of Destruction
Byline: Niall Ferguson There are plenty of arguments against an Israeli attack on Iran. And all of them are bad. Jerusalem--It probably felt a bit like this in the months before the Six-Day War of 1967, when Israel launched its hugely successful...
The Master of His Domain
Byline: Ari Karpel Reality shows, comedy films, self-help books--is there anything Kevin Smith can't do? Getting kicked off an airplane for being too fat turned out to be the best thing that ever happened to Kevin Smith. At first, of course,...
The Sunshine Boys
Byline: Michael Daly A spectacular heist. A foiled burglary. Two thieves in their 70s. Where's the diamond? At a time when even Mafia bosses turn informant, two slippery-fingered septuagenarians from Chicago are proving as rare as the famed diamond...
The Wannabe Network
Byline: Rebecca Dana Al Gore's Current TV is remaking itself as the anti-Fox. Can an election year, Occupy Wall Street, and Keith Olbermann propel it out of oblivion? It was early November when tensions between Keith Olbermann and Al Gore escalated...
The World on a Page
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Cardboard Khomeini, suicidal Sarkozy--and dear old Wislawa Szymborska. YES WUKAN! A Chinese village, Wukan, conducted the first free public political election in Communist China. Authorities offered the ballot box to...
Tripping through Time
Byline: Gary Marcus Why has evolution let drugs be fun? When I was in a college, a slightly older friend, smart as a tack and admired by all, died from an overdose of nitrous oxide--a drug that recently popped up in the news when it was alleged...
Who Started This Fight?
Byline: Michelle Goldberg The Planned Parenthood flap was a triumph for conservative mischief-maker Lila Rose. The woman who lit the fuse. Last week, when the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation announced it would stop funding Planned Parenthood,...