Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 3

A Case of Prius Envy; Honda Introduced the Gas-Electric Car to America, but Toyota's Prius Became the Synonym for 'Hybrid.' Here's How Honda Hopes to Regain Its Enviro Street Cred
Byline: Keith Naughton (with Mary Chapman) Peter Kessner, a devout environmentalist, bought a Honda Civic hybrid four years ago to show everyone that he wants to save the planet. The only problem: no one noticed, since, other than the hybrid badge...
A Doctor Says She Didn't Murder Her Patients
Byline: Julie Scelfo The tragic deaths at New Orleans's Memorial Medical Center after Hurricane Katrina were among the most notorious examples of the vast human suffering that resulted from the flooding of the city--and the government's incompetent...
BeliefWatch: Ever After
Byline: Lisa Miller No group is more emphatically and publicly opposed to the practice of polygamy than the Latter-day Saints. The topic is, however, irresistible and perennial. While the Mormon Church banned plural marriage more than 100 years...
Black-Gold Booster; Energy's Future: A Onetime Oilman Admits We Need Alternatives, but Says There's Plenty of Petroleum Left
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Lee Raymond succeeded as an oilman by staying focused on oil. (In the mid-1980s, he was responsible for unwinding the alternative-energy program at his former company, Exxon.) Now chairman of the National Petroleum Council,...
Bush's History Problem; in Vietnam, Our Adversary Had an Alternative Ideology. That Is Not the Case in Iraq
Byline: Michael Hirsh Much was changing in Vietnam when I visited in December 1991, in the waning hours of the Soviet Union. The coziness between Moscow and Hanoi, once comrades, had curdled into mutual contempt. The Russians, aware their empire...
Campus Crusaders; the Complicated Story of Tiny Patrick Henry College, Where Christian Students Prepare for the World's Fight
Byline: Lisa Miller Patrick Henry College, in Purcellville, Va., is the kind of place that would make most coastal liberals run screaming. A tiny college with about 500 students, its stated goal is to "prepare Christian men and women who will lead...
Disinvited to the Party
Byline: Anna Quindlen One of the complaints you hear a lot from readers when you're in my line of work and live in my part of the country is that you can't understand America from the vantage point of New York City. I'm beginning to think there's...
Dissent on the Front
Byline: Nick Summers and Catharine Skipp Are there consequences for soldiers who write publicly, and prominently, against the war? Eight are finding out. "We have failed on every promise," wrote seven 82nd Airborne paratroopers in a stark dispatch...
Dollars for Scholars; A Bold Experiment Pays Parents to Do the Right Thing
Byline: Raina Kelley Paying kids for good grades is a popular (if questionable) parenting tactic. But when school starts next week, New York City will try to use the same enticement to get parents in low-income neighborhoods more involved in their...
Fall Preview: Movies; Summer's over, School Is Back, but the Consolation of Fall Was Always That the Best Films, Shows, CDs and Books Were Ripe for Picking. Now There's Too Much Competition, Too Much Stuff. How to Figure out What's Worthy? Here Is a Warts-and-All Preview, Arranged from Sublime to Subprime
'No Country for Old Men,' 11/9: The mighty Coen brothers have been in a rut. Their last two films, "Intolerable Cruelty" and "The Ladykillers," both big-studio comedies, flopped. But they're back on familiar ground with this eye-popping adaptation...
Fall Preview: Music
'Graduation,' Kanye West, 9/11: West's third record drops the same day rival rapper 50 Cent releases his new CD. A showdown has ensued (naturally), and 50 has vowed to quit the rap game forever if West outsells him (country crooner Kenny Chesney has...
Fall Preview: Television
'Dirty Sexy Money,' 9/26: Start with that title: so deliberately sleazy, so nakedly provocative that it must be a joke, right? Yep, it's a joke, and it's a good one. ABC's "Dirty Sexy Money" is a rollicking satire, a cathartic slap at a culture that...
Fall Preview: Theater & Art
'Young Frankenstein,' 11/8: Can lightning strike twice? We don't mean the lightning crackling around the mad doctor's spooky castle. We mean: can Mel Brooks have a monster hit transforming his 1974 movie comedy into a Broadway musical, just as he...
Into Thin Air
Byline: This story was reported by Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border; Zahid Hussain in Islamabad; Rod Nordland in Tora Bora; Mark Hosenball, Michael Hirsh, Michael Isikoff, John Barry, Dan Ephron and Eve Conant in Washington;...
Mt. Vernon, Va.: Washington Slept Here
Byline: Michael Beschloss Shortly before George Washington retired as president in 1797, two of his cherished house slaves--Martha's helper Oney Judge and their chef, Hercules--ran away. Tracked down at Washington's order, Oney tried to set strict...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Q&A: Scarlett Johansson Her last performance was in a Justin Timberlake music video, but Johansson returns to movies as the nanny in "The Nanny Diaries." She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Did you have a nanny growing up?...
Pakistan's Power Game; Former Leader Benazir Bhutto on the Tumult in Islamabad
Byline: Lally Weymouth It looks like Pervez Musharraf's days as president of Pakistan may be numbered if he does not change course. With one rival, former prime minister Nawaz Sharif, threatening to return to Pakistan, Musharraf has been meeting...
Perspectives: Quotes in the News
"I say to the president ... 'Pick whatever number you wish'." Sen. John Warner, on his proposed withdrawal of an as-yet-undetermined number of U.S. troops from Iraq by winter "Sentencing is about a final accounting. It is a closure; it is a...
Putting Brains on the Couch
Byline: Sharon Begley (With Jeneen Interlandi) For doctors who treat illnesses that strike from the neck down, a patient's symptoms are only the first step toward a diagnosis. No sooner do they hear "It hurts when I climb stairs" than they order...
Taking on Tourette's; A New Approach to Stopping Tics before They Happen Offers Hope to Thousands Who Live with the Disorder
Byline: Catharine Skipp and Arian Campo-Flores Marg MacKrell was just 3 when her parents noticed the first signs of what turned out to be Tourette syndrome. The blond toddler began sniffing her fingers repeatedly, and over the next six years, her...
The Catch-22 of Economics
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We are now in the "blame phase" of the economic cycle. As the housing slump deepens and swings in financial markets widen, we've embarked on the usual search for culprits. Who got us into this mess? Our investigations...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Sami Yousafzai, NEWSWEEK's correspondent in Afghanistan, wasn't counting on the interview. In reporting this week's cover story on the six-year hunt for Osama bin Laden, Sami reached out to a Taliban source who told him to come...
The Love That Will Finally Speak Its Name; It Took the Death of My Dear Life Partner for Me to Find the Courage to Come out of the Closet
Byline: Loraine Barr I was born at a time when to have romantic feelings for another woman was known as "the love that dare not speak its name." I first read Radclyffe Hall's "The Well of Loneliness" around 1938, in my impressionable teens. The...
When Opposites Attract; Washington and Lafayette Were Oddly Matched, but Joined Forces in the Great, Close-Run Fight for Equality and Freedom
Byline: Evan Thomas On July 27, 1777, the Marquis de Lafayette and 14 other French military officers arrived in Philadelphia hot, filthy and exhausted. They had slipped past the British blockade in Charleston, S.C., and trekked for 32 days to the...
You, Too, Can Have A Bionic Body; New Materials and High-Tech Procedures Are Driving a Surge in Hip, Knee and Even Ankle Replacements
Byline: Mary Carmichael Susan Burke's left knee was humbling her. At 54, she wanted to hike and whitewater raft through the national parks or, at the very least, to stroll around the block with her husband at night, as she'd always done. Instead,...