Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 21, November 19

A Century of Destiny
Byline: Jerry Adler It is not just 1968 -- many years are jostling for starring roles in history. It was 1908, a year whose importance was certified at the very stroke of midnight, when, for the first time ever, a ball covered with light bulbs...
A Facebook for Boomers
Byline: Robin Wolaner; Wolaner Is The Founder And CEO Of tbd.Com. As she turned 50, the founder of Parenting magazine wanted more than an AARP card. Her new start-up aims to be a social network for the graying set. I didn't set out to start a...
A Final Journey with Mom
Byline: Joe Hakes; Hakes Lives In Danvers, Mass. When it came time to scatter my mother's ashes, I was able to remember her all over again. When my father makes an announcement, it usually comes after long and deliberate thought. He is 90, and...
A Radical Cleric Gets Religion
Byline: Rod Nordland, With John Barry In Washington, Maziar Bahari In Tehran And Hussam Ali in Baghdad It wasn't so long ago that U.S. commanders considered Moqtada al-Sadr to be the greatest threat to stability in Iraq. Now the Shiite firebrand's...
'Arthur Bremer Is Alone'
Byline: Catharine Skipp And Arian Campo-Flores The man who shot George Wallace is now out of prison, but questions about his stability remain. In the frigid hours before dawn last Friday, Arthur Bremer emerged from the Maryland Correctional Institution...
A Titan of Globalism
Byline: Richard M. Smith The CEO of India's Infosys champions outsourcing. In the past decade, "offshoring" has created much anxiety for American info-tech workers. But for Infosys Technologies, the India-based company that's led the revolution...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Linda Stern Simplicity can sometimes be overrated. Folks may pay a price when they insist on keeping their finances pared down. Here's how to make money by complicating matters. * Use lots of banks: Your neighborhood branch might have...
Chef! This Dish Needs Pain Relief
Byline: Anna Kuchment Some spices improve your health, as well as your cooking. Tip Sheet's Anna Kuchment asked Dr. Mark Lee, medical editor of the "Mayo Clinic Book of Alternative Medicine," for details. NEWSWEEK: What herbs and spices have...
Giving It Everything They've Got
Byline: Jennie Yabroff During the U.S. Men's Olympic marathon trials Nov. 3, runner Ryan Shay, who had been diagnosed as a child with an enlarged heart, died of cardiac arrest. The next day, new mother Paula Radcliffe, who had trained throughout...
His Fine Feathered Friends, and Ours
Byline: Wayne Pacelle; Pacelle Is President And Ceo Of The Humane Society Of The United States. When Pacelle heard about a charity pigeon shoot, he decided to fire back. For as long as I can remember, I've felt a sense of kinship and empathy...
Injection of Reflection
There's wide support for a death penalty, but those who carry it out are increasingly uncomfortable. Texas has long been the hang 'em high state. In 2000, it executed convicted prisoners at the rate of almost one a week. Gov. George W. Bush seemed...
'It's All about Energy, Stupid!'
Byline: Karen Breslau; With Roxana Popescu In Boston And Constance Loizos In Silicon ValleyWith In Boston And In Silicon Valley If you run a business that's into renewable power, expect a presidential candidate to stop by. We profile four such companies...
It's Ms. America to You
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz They did not burn their bras, but feminists ignited a global movement. In a tumultuous year, a demonstration by 100 women on the boardwalk in Atlantic City seemed relatively tame. There were no riots. Some of those...
'J' My Name Is Jessica, and I like --
Byline: Sharon Begley Here at NEWSWEEK, we have a soft spot for Ken Griffey Jr., but that's not why we're making excuses for his 18 percent career strikeout rate -- a notch above baseball's historic average. The excuse is his initial: that K makes...
Just Beware of the White Lightning
Byline: Melinda Liu Car culture is booming in China. So are roadside eateries. On many nice days, the hills north of Beijing are alive with the sound of noisy restaurant attendants, some waving red banners, standing at the side of the road shouting,...
Logging on to Lose Those Extra Pounds
Byline: Joan Raymond; With Roxana Popescu Jeanne Dulaney is a time-crunched software consultant who often eats out on the company expense account. But the 51-year-old from Montgomery, Ala., paid the price for her frequent restaurant dining: 40 extra...
Lost in the Cornfields
Byline: Richard Wolffe Is John Edwards in trouble in Iowa? Peg Dunbar thinks so. She signed up as a county chair for Edwards in the northeastern town of Waverly earlier this year, after backing the former senator's campaign in 2004. Now she has...
Mickey's Management Mojo
Byline: Daniel Gross Disney World, a carefully constructed capitalist fantasyland, clearly has a lot to teach about the realities of business. Compared with war correspondents, business reporters have it easy. Sure, we cope with tough challenges:...
No Reversing This Curse
Byline: Stryker Mcguire Conspicuously absent from the 2008 race is Bob Shrum, the uber-consultant who worked on eight presidential campaigns before retiring to Cape Cod, Mass. But across the Atlantic, Shrum, 64, is still quietly plying his trade...
Pakistan's Pinstripe Revolution
Byline: Fareed Zakaria; With Ron Moreau In Islamabad Gen. Pervez Musharraf never wanted to be a politician. But his emergency decree has made the return of civilian politics inevitable. The first time I saw president Pervez Musharraf in person...
Perspectives
Byline: Sources: AP (5), New York Times (3) "You can see this bubble coming out of their heads that says, 'He's gone crazy'." Former British prime minister Tony Blair, on friends who wish him "good luck" as Middle East envoy for the United States,...
Peru and Other Menaces
Byline: George F. Will Before panicking, people should remember the witticism that the stock market has predicted nine of the last three recessions. Last Wednesday, when the Dow dropped 360.92 points, 132 members of the House of Representatives...
Racing for New Riches
Byline: Owen Matthews; With Karen MacGregor In Durban, South Africa Russian and Chinese investors are battling for African resources to fuel their growing empires. Late on a Friday at the Simba Saloon in downtown Nairobi, music by the Kenyan...
Sentry of a Century
Byline: Malcolm Jones Norman Mailer: 1923-2007 Writing Norman Mailer's obituary is something like writing the obituaries of five or six very different people all at once. He began his long career with a bulky, partly autobiographical novel about...
Setting A New Course
Byline: Daniel Mcginn Garmin is a leader in consumer GPS technology. But it now faces plummeting prices and competition from cell phones. Can the company find its way? It is precisely 3,068 miles from the North Pole to the giant warehouse at...
So Happy Together
Byline: Mark Hosenball; With Michael Isikoff Bill archenemy Richard Mellon Scaife now has 'admiration' for him. Huh? Bill Clinton is never at a loss for company. When he's not globe-trotting or charming audiences for as much as $400,000 a speech,...
The Authenticity Test
Byline: Lisa Miller Just 40% of Americans go to church weekly, but 70% want a president with strong religious faith. Over the past three years, Sen. John Kerry has had a lot of time to think about his God, and at a meeting with journalists in...
The Earth Behind A Man's Thumb
The first orbit of the moon reminded us of life's fragility. In a new book, the author of 'The Greatest Generation' looks at how a year ended, and a new age began. There was at the end of 1968 an event that remains an inspirational symbol for the...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham In 1966, Tom Brokaw moved to Los Angeles to work for NBC News. Born in 1940, "a child of the 1950s, with a foot in the '60s," he found himself face to face with the contradictory cultural forces that would shape the next four...
The Felicity of Motherhood
Keri Russell plays a mom in "August Rush," and five months ago her life caught up to her work. We asked the former "Felicity" star what she's learned about becoming a parent. 1. Call the doctor, then call a car: "Arrange your transportation to the...
The Fine Art of Deception
Byline: Kathleen Deveny; with Ginny Power I'm sure there are some parents who save their kid's artwork in a thoughtful, methodical fashion. I can picture them carefully curating their refrigerator doors, choosing the brightest fall landscapes and...
The Kingmaker's New Subject
Byline: Michael Gerson Pat Robertson's support for Giuliani surprised many. It should not have. There is an old hymn written by Fanny Crosby, sung at generations of camp meetings, which exclaims: "Crown Him! Crown Him! Prophet, and Priest, and...
The Networked Man
Byline: Steven Levy Cisco's CEO is a key ambassador of high-tech. The internet, it is often noted, has no president. But if one were to make a shortlist of people who might be considered the de facto leader of that vast network, John Chambers...
The Worst Week
Byline: Evan Thomas ***** Correction: In "The Worst Week" (Nov. 19) we said that Martin Luther King Jr. gave his final speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis. In fact, the speech was at Mason Temple at the headquarters of the Church of God in...
The Year That Changed Everything
Byline: Jonathan Darman The 1968 election is four decades old, and yet we're still rehashing that moment -- that era -- in the 2008 contest. Why do we come back to it? And why won't it leave us alone? Barack Obama was born in the 1960s but is...
Tourists Who Stay Close to Home
Byline: Owen Matthews; With Quindlen Krovatin In Beijing, Sudip Mazumdar In New Delhi And Anna Nemtsova In Moscow In countries across Eurasia, high-end resorts and services are attracting the wealthy locals. A decade ago, hotels in the princely...
Toyota's Green Problem
Byline: Keith Naughton Despite the Prius, environmentalists are turning on the carmaker for opposing new gas-mileage laws. When Toyota introduced its Prius hybrid car in America seven years ago, Detroit laughed it off. With gas prices at $1.50...
Tuned in, Turned On
Byline: David Gates The times they were a-changin', but in the arts only music kept pace. When you think of 1968, you think of riots, assassinations, the Vietnam War, the youth revolt, the backlash -- and the songs. It was the year of "Hey Jude,"...
Weep for the Grim Reaper
Byline: Daniel Gross It's a tough time to be in the death-care business -- or what all us non-undertakers refer to as funeral homes. At Service Corp. International (SCI), the Houston-based giant with 2,000 homes, the number of services conducted...
What the Beatles Gave Science
Byline: Sharon Begley Their visit popularized the notion that the spiritual East has something to teach the rational West. Like millions of others who believed there must be more to life than the libertine exuberance of the '60s, the Beatles...
Why I Write
Byline: Ellis Cose I Pondered Why It Was That My City, My World, Was So Divided By Color. I did not seek out the '60s; they found me: in my living room where, as a kid during a hot summer night, I bore witness to the madness of the times. That...