Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 24, December 10

A Big Dose of Skepticism
Byline: Jerry Adler It's not too soon to start thinking about New Year's resolutions, and here's mine, as a medical writer: I will not report on any amazing new treatments for anything, unless they were tested in large, randomized, placebo-controlled,...
A Changing Portrait of DNA
Byline: Mary Carmichael Every day, it seems, scientists learn something new about how our genes work. The latest insights into the dazzling and complex machinery of life itself. Four years ago, a Duke University biologist named Randy Jirtle began...
Ah, the Secluded Life
Byline: Emily Vencat And Ginanne Brownell; WITH BARRETT SHERIDAN The superrich are finding new ways to set themselves apart. It's not just clubs, resorts and Gulfstreams. Now there are private concerts, stores -- and islands. PRIVACY, PLEASE:...
American Idol
Byline: Steve Tuttle Evel Knievel, 1938-2007 If you're a man of a certain age, then you spent a lot of Sunday afternoons building ramps and wearing capes and trying to be the first on the block to jump over your Labrador retriever. Or maybe you...
An Old Face Resurfaces
Byline: Michael Isikoff Don't ever say the Bush administration doesn't take care of its own. Nearly three years after Paul Wolfowitz resigned as deputy Defense secretary and six months after his stormy departure as president of the World Bank --...
A Special Delivery
Byline: Jennie Yabroff With all the films about unplanned pregnancy this year, 'Juno' is the only one to discuss abortion. This may go down as the year Hollywood forgot to wear a condom. Several prominent films -- "Knocked Up," "Waitress," "Bella,"...
Avoiding A Tech Sunset
Byline: Steven Levy How do you turn around a legend? 'Courage.' Scott McNealy ran Sun Microsystems for 22 years and became as famous as that pioneering workstation company itself. We knew about his minus golf handicap, his loathing of Microsoft...
Beyond Silicon Valley
Investors looking for the next big things need to take a detour. New tech hubs are flourishing abroad. For more than a decade, Silicon Valley has been considered the epicenter of innovation. All the key elements of a tech revolution are located...
Bones of Invention
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz New research into the causes and treatment of osteoporosis offers hope to thousands of patients. It's all about you. You have a personal banker, a personal trainer, perhaps even a personal acupuncturist who knows just...
Brains and Mysteries
A Harvard neurologist takes on the human nervous system and some of nature's most baffling diseases. Whitehouse, N.J.: My dad died of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. What is the chance that I would be diagnosed with one or both of these diseases? Is...
Bringing Spice to A Hot Land
Byline: Mac Margolis A Brazilian engineer uses solar power to make the desert bloom. Don't look for Baixas in a guidebook. There are no hotels or historical landmarks here, only a dirt track leading to a cluster of mud-and-wattle huts. The model-studded...
Capital Ideas
Byline: Linda Stern So, how are you doing? It used to be that you were OK if you earned the equivalent of your age in thousands, but success has become a lot costlier and more complicated since then. Here are some updated ways to measure your financial...
Catching Up, with A Little Help
Byline: Ron Cassie; Cassie Lives In Frederick, Md. When it comes to my education, I'm making up for lost time. Fortunately, I have a good teacher. I am a 44-year-old recovering knucklehead. Following the path of most of the guys I knew growing...
Chuck and Huck: GOP's Delta Force?
Byline: Howard Fineman Here's a Chuck Norris fact you may not know. If Chuck Norris endorses you and appears in one of your campaign's TV ads, you take the lead in an Iowa poll and your Web server crashes. That's what happened to Mike Huckabee,...
Coloring outside the Lines
Byline: Jessica Bennett After years of humiliating sexual-abuse scandals, Roman Catholic Church officials are trying harder than ever to convince parishioners that they're doing everything they can to prevent such tragedies from happening again....
Cures for an Ailing System
With health care emerging as a major issue in the 2008 presidential race, NEWSWEEK asked seven Harvard experts to identify specific problems that ought to be addressed, and the steps that should be taken to solve them. Ensure That Every American...
De-Stressing Christmas
Byline: Linda Stern If the winter holidays have become more about finance than fun, take heed. Most households will add to their already-worrisome credit-card balances over the next month, and that can cause season-ruining stress. So cut back on...
Diagnosis: Same as It Never Was
A Harvard psychiatrist tracks the evolution of his discipline's 'bible.' The word "diagnosis" comes from the Greek "to recognize" or "to know." The concept is an ideal in medicine, where to recognize and understand a disease is a prerequisite to...
Don't Give Up on Afghanistan
The fact that Afghans haven't is all the more reason for us to stay engaged. Every time I step before a podium, someone will inevitably raise his hand, and say, "So, Mr. Hosseini, are you optimistic or pessimistic about the future of Afghanistan?"...
Do Real Friends Share Ads?
Byline: Steven Levy Who wants to broadcast the news that he's bought a can of Sprite? Who wants to see that on a Facebook News Feed? Facebook has never been shy about its ambitions. Its 23-year-old founder, Mark Zuckerberg, sees its current valuation...
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Giuliani
Byline: Anna Quindlen A mind is a terrible thing to change. That's why Rudy decided to double his base by turning himself into two candidates at once. I'm an ardent environmentalist, but I can deal if companies with long records of polluting...
Dubuque's Got the 'Joe Mo'!
Byline: Jonathan Alter Should Clinton lose Iowa, the door might open for second-tier candidates to start getting competitive. America is still ready for a white male!" an overcaffeinated, white female Iowan shouted at me after a Joe Biden event...
Fat, Carbs and the Science of Conception
In a groundbreaking new book, Harvard researchers look at the role of diet, exercise and weight control in fertility. Guarantee: you will be surprised. Every new life starts with two seemingly simple events. First, an active sperm burrows into a...
First-Class Airports! Guess Where?
Byline: Daniel Gross In the developing world, urban life is a hieronymus Bosch-like vision of tangled traffic, crumbling infrastructure, overcrowding and crippling economic inefficiencies. The population of Vietnam is 85 million souls, of which...
From CEO to Space Tourist
Byline: Charles Simonyi The software guru decided to see if he had the 'right stuff.' How does one decide to visit space? Until recently, no one had faced such a decision. Rare people with the "right stuff" could dedicate their lives to becoming...
Helio Takes His Victory Lap Dance
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh He was the dark horse who fox-trotted his way to victory. Brazilian race-car driver Helio Castroneves was crowned winner of "Dancing With the Stars" last week. He spoke with Ramin Setoodeh. Are you going to get teased on...
Highway to Hell?
Byline: Gretel C. Kovach Ron Paul's worked up about U.S. sovereignty. Ron Paul wants you to be scared. There's a conspiracy in the land -- what he calls a "conspiracy of ideas" -- to give up America's sovereignty. It's a shadowy scheme that begins...
Hooray for Bollywood
Byline: Jason Overdorf India's film industry has long been prolific and chaotic. Now, with modern business leaders, it's coming of age -- and taking aim at Hollywood, U.S.A. Ronnie Screwvala is the front runner in the race to become Bollywood's...
Is Photography Dead?
Byline: Peter Plagens How is that even remotely possible? The medium certainly looks alive, well and, if anything, overpopulated. There are hordes of photographers out there, working with back-to-basics pinhole cameras and pixeled images measured...
Jacko, When He Was King
Byline: Joshua Alston Michael Jackson is handsome and charming. He's flirtatious. He's mostly guileless, sometimes a little confrontational. He's magnetic. I don't mean now. Now Jackson is a creepy symbol of the afflictive nature of fame. But...
Jogging Your Memory
Byline: Anne Underwood You can push your aging brain to recall more facts and dates, scientists say, if you use a little muscle. Brad Williams, a 51-year-old radio anchor in La Crosse, Wis., used to joke that, if he ever married, he would never...
Launching the Next Generation
The German cofounder of SAP has helped to create design institutes at two universities. He says education is the key to high-tech innovation. After German reunification, I was in Potsdam, in the former East, for the first time since my very early...
Mail Call
A new kind of reading experience 'Books Aren't Dead': Readers of our cover story on going digital had serious reservations about Amazon's new e-reader, the Kindle. Many were underwhelmed. One said, "A printed book is great. When I'm done, I can...
Perspectives
"Kill her by firing squad." The cry from thousands of Sudanese protesters, demanding the execution of Gillian Gibbons, a British teacher convicted of insulting Islam for allowing her students to name a teddy bear "Muhammad." Gibbons was sentenced to...
Putting on Their Game Faces
Byline: Richard Wolffe; With Eleanor Clift and Holly Bailey Democratic voters, stung by crushing defeats in 2000 and 2004, may just want a candidate who can win. How Obama and Clinton are each making the case. One of the most common complaints...
Quick Read
Intellectual Property: The Tough New Realities That Could Make or Break Your Business By Paul Goldstein As economic power has shifted from those who make things to those who make ideas, the ability of a person or company to own and control ideas...
Rx for Health Care: Pain
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Health care is ultimately a political issue of making choices. The present politics aims to hide the costs and skew the choices. We need to have a candid debate about health care in 2008, but the odds are against it....
Say Hello to the Bugs in Your Gut
Byline: Patrick J. Skerrett And W. Allan Walker, M.D. Your small and large intestines are home to countless microbes that some scientists think may play a major role in determining how fat or skinny you are. Whenever you eat, even if it's just...
Selective Memories
Byline: Michael Isikoff Master spinners Bill Clinton and Karl Rove try to rewrite the roles they played in the run-up to war. With the recent tapering off in U.S. casualties, the war in Iraq has receded -- for now -- as the dominant issue in...
Shaken Well, with a Twist
Byline: Julia Reed Try one of the world's great drinks, the sidecar, which features the warming combination of brandy and Cointreau. Several months ago I was in a posh and very well-known steakhouse in Washington, D.C., with a powerful and very...
Start Your Planning Now
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld Are you expecting a tax refund this year? It might be delayed. Congress hasn't yet agreed on how to cap an automatic tax increase that could catch more people than the law originally...
Suits for All Seasons
Top execs want tailors to come to them. In return, they'll buy scores of pinstripes at the same time. Last summer a large yacht appeared in the Bay of Naples. Onboard was a leading American industrialist. Shortly after it anchored, a tender was...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham The story of the making of this week's cover story is a fairly common one at NEWSWEEK. There was careful planning for months -- and then, with the deadline approaching, we got excited about a new angle and quickly changed course....
The Gates Keeper
Byline: Dan Ephron, Michael Hirsh And Evan Thomas; With John Barry And Mark Hosenball In Washington And Rod Nordland In Baghdad The man in charge of America's warmaking machinery is also the best insurance it won't be used against Iran. Late...
The Qatari Connection
Byline: Michael Isikoff Giuliani won't release a full list of his business interests. One now-public deal is of particular note. In March 2005, a suicide bomber linked to Al Qaeda set off a massive explosion at a British school in Doha, the capital...
The Search for Thugs
Byline: Raina Kelley Sean Taylor's death proved one thing. Young black men are stigmatized as gangstas, asking for trouble. There was a sad inevitability to the media coverage of NFL star Sean Taylor's murder last week in Miami -- Taylor succumbed...
The Sunni Civil War
Byline: Larry Kaplow And Rod Nordland; With Silvia Spring In Arab Jabour They're fighting with words, not bullets. But the rift is still dangerous. The men who shot up Faisal Mohammed Ali's village couldn't have been more conspicuous. "They were...
Truth and Consequence
Byline: David Ansen In the riveting 'Atonement,' a 13-year-old girl tells a lie that destroys many lives, including her own. Ian McEwan's novel "Atonement" -- and Joe Wright's mesmerizing, remarkably faithful screen version -- pivots on a series...
War Inside the Kremlin
Byline: Owen Matthews And Anna Nemtsova Rivalries at the top threaten to tear Russia apart. No shots were fired a few weeks ago when AK-47-wielding members of two Russian police agencies faced off outside a suburban Moscow mansion -- but it got...
Waving Bye to Webkinz?
Byline: Daniel McGinn For months, America's toy stores endured a near-hourly ritual: the phone would ring, and a tiny voice would ask: "Do you have any raccoon Webkinz?" Parents drove from store to store, hunting for the bullfrog or the alley cat....
When Oprah Met Obama, on the Trail
Byline: Allison Samuels And Richard Wolffe They bonded during a flight from Chicago to Houston, musing over their odd-sounding names that begin with "O." It was a light-hearted moment between Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama during an otherwise serious...
You Called for Me, Sir?
Byline: Mac Margolis Demand for butlers is booming. Anybody can drive a Rolls. But today's tycoon needs a household COO. Don't look for it in your local classifieds, but a new kind of help-wanted notice is rippling the labor market. "House Manager...