Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 12, March 24

A Delegate Loophole?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Citing wiggle room in an obscure, 26-year-old Democratic Party rule, Hillary Clinton's campaign is leaving the door open to the idea of attempting to persuade Barack Obama's pledged delegates to switch their votes at the...
'A Good Way to Spread A Message'
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh For Capt. Jim Marckwardt, coming to Iraq in 2005 was like being a kid again. Blackouts, water shortages, car bombs and guerrilla shoot-outs--just like his middle-school years in Peru, where his father worked for the U.S....
An Electronic Cure for Despair
Byline: Rich Thomas; Thomas Lives In Potomac, Md. Sigrid needed a reason to keep fighting. A quick e-mail to our friends did more than I'd imagined. My pain-worn wife, Sigrid, lay on the hospital bed, a tube down her nose and half a dozen IVs...
A Penny Saved Is a Penny Spent
Byline: Eve Conant My generation doesn't know how to be thrifty. That could spell disaster. My grandfather Arkady, a World War II refugee from Ukraine, stored plastic bags of leftover bread crusts in his closet in case the family went broke and...
A Rottweiler, Now in English
Byline: David Ansen A remake proves that 'Funny Games' is ugly in any language. Michael Haneke's "Funny Games" is a scene-by-scene, almost shot-by-shot, remake, in English, of his 1997 Austrian film of the same title. Both versions are impossible...
Bottom of the Barrel
Byline: George Wehrfritz, Erika Kinetz and Jonathan Kent; With Joe Cochrane In Indonesia And Sudip Mazumdar In New Delhi Millions of Asian workers producing goods sold here are trapped in servitude. Some of the world's leading computer makers...
Decades of Assimilation
Byline: Andrew Murr Social scientists rarely get more than a passing glimpse as minority groups struggle to achieve the American Dream. But a pair of UCLA experts have just published a new book that offers a unique, 35-year, time-lapse view of economic...
Don't Forget Your Vitamins
Byline: Tina Peng More than half the U.S. population--including about 70 percent of the elderly and 90 percent of minorities--is vitamin-D deficient, according to Dr. James E. Dowd, author of "The Vitamin D Cure." The nutrient helps maintain normal...
End the Disc-O Madness!
Byline: N'Gai Croal My friends and I bought so many DVDs that we would joke about how many were still sitting in their original shrink-wrap. The Darwinian battle for the next generation of DVDs ended last month, as Toshiba admitted defeat and...
For A Superhealthy Glow
Byline: Jac Chebatoris Checking the ingredients list on food packages has become a no-brainer for the health-conscious. But what about the ingredients for personal-care products? Read the label on that bottle of moisturizer and you may find ingredients...
Foreign Battleground
Byline: Michael Hirsh; With Michael Isikoff The commander-in-chief test is no breeze. Obama and Clinton pass some sections, but need help in others. It was the classic 3 a.m. call, and Bill Clinton later said that not responding to it was the...
Get Your Workout in Gear
Byline: Tara Weingarten Working out shouldn't be effortless, but the right equipment or accessory can make it less of a hassle. TIP SHEET found that these products gave our fitness routine a boost. Walkvest: As you progress in your exercise and...
Give Your Knees A Break
Byline: Karen Springen Running helps prevent obesity, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and heart disease. It also helps with mental health while burning between 450 and 1,400 calories an hour, depending on a runner's speed and size. No wonder...
Here's Looking at You, Kids
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Artists discover the Documentation Generation. But can we trust what they see? When filmmaker Caroline Suh decided to make a documentary about the student-council election at New York's Stuyvesant High School, she was concerned...
His Dark Journey
There's no way to have predicted his recklessness. But a look at Eliot Spitzer's past helps explain his capacity for risk. He was contrite, but he still managed to sound self-righteous. "Over the course of my public life, I have insisted, I believe...
Honey, I Shrunk the Car
Byline: Keith Naughton; With Jason Overdorf, Patrick Crowley And Mary Hennock Gas costs are up. So is Third World consumer demand. The result: a new breed of cars that are cooler, cheaper and incredibly small. Goodbye, Hummer. When gas prices...
How to Make Sarah Laugh
Byline: Lisa Miller Does being religious actually help you get pregnant? It's possible, says a fertility specialist. The biblical matriarch Sarah is perhaps history's most famous infertile woman. As a member of a tribe that valued family above...
How to Sound Presidential
Byline: Katie Baker The orations of politicians, George Orwell once complained, "vary from party to party, but they are all alike in that one almost never finds in them a fresh, vivid, homemade turn of speech." It's an opiate-of-the-masses view...
'I Have A Very Deep Well of Empathy'
Byline: Howard Fineman Ralph Nader tells NEWSWEEK that voters need options at the ballot box. Options like him. If there were a Mount Rushmore of reform, Ralph Nader's profile would be on it. But now, at 74, he is known less as the father of...
In Defense of Cheering
Byline: Jennie Yabroff They jump. They shout. A few become president. It's time for cheerleaders to get some respect. The team is in bad shape. One member has a broken rib. The other, a possible concussion from a nasty fall. A third wraps a compression...
Kosovo's Dark Meaning
Byline: George F. Will The United States, which quickly recognized Kosovo's independence, has not always been so tolerant of the principle of secession. In 1915, a year after a spark struck in the Balkans ignited a European conflagration, Walter...
Less Pain, More Gain
Byline: Karen Springen No athlete wants an aching back. Yet it's extremely common: in 2005, 15 percent of U.S. adults reported back problems, and an estimated 60 to 90 percent of Americans get lower back pain at some time in their lives. "There's...
Love Me, Love My Mix Tape
Byline: Jessica Bennett It took hours to make: every free moment curled by the boombox, the local radio station's song-request line set to speed dial, the volume knob turned loud enough to hear, but quiet enough not to wake Mom and Dad. Then, finally,...
Making Airline Travel Feel Less like Torture
Byline: Daniel McGinn; With Ashley Harris Carriers are installing ever-more-cushy seats to keep their biggest-spending customers flying. To the average passenger, an airline seat is a cramp-inducing, ill-fitting device that's the closest most...
Mismanagement 101
Byline: Daniel Gross The dollar's woes reflect the world's collective verdict on the ability of the U.S. to manage the global financial system. Last November, president George W. Bush, in an interview with Fox Business Network, summoned his inner...
More Bloodshed in Tibet
Byline: Melinda Liu As police clashed with Tibetan protesters in Lhasa last week, shops were set on fire, vehicles overturned, ethnic Chinese attacked and crowds turned back by tear gas in the worst civil unrest to seize the remote region in nearly...
Mysteries and Complications
Byline: Claudia Kalb; With Karen Springen ***** Correction: In "Mysteries and Complications" (March 24), we said that the MMR vaccine once contained thimerosal. It did not. Other childhood vaccines, however, did contain the mercury-based preservative....
On the Upward Slide
Byline: Steven Levy For Max Levchin, one jackpot is only a start. When Horatio Alger moves to Silicon Valley, you get the American Dream on steroids. Case in point is Max Levchin. In 1991, at 16, he immigrated to Chicago from Ukraine. Seven years...
Perspectives
"Only the lobbyists." David Paterson, in his first press conference since the announcement that he would succeed Eliot Spitzer as New York's governor, responding to a reporter who asked whether he, like Spitzer, had ever patronized a prostitute...
Saving Private Ryan
Byline: Nick Gostin Ryan Phillippe stars in "Stop Loss," a movie about soldiers forced to serve an extra tour of duty in Iraq. He spoke with Nicki Gostin: Did you talk to soldiers when you made the movie? Yes, we went to boot camp with some...
Scions of the Surge
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh and Evan Thomas; With Larry Kaplow, Hussam Ali and Yasar Kani In Baghdad Five years on, the war is transforming the American officer corps. A doctor's son, Tim Wright was a Latin scholar with a 3.8 average in high...
Sorry, Clowns Aren't Included
Byline: Keith Naughton The Smart is fun. But the performance isn't great. Driving a nine-foot-long Smart car among the incredible hulks on Detroit's roads sounded like a suicide mission. After all, the Smart ForTwo (as in, seats two) might be...
Spitzer in Mind, the D.C.Madam Makes Her Case
Byline: Eve Conant If there's one woman who might take some small comfort in the Eliot Spitzer sex scandal, it's Deborah Jeane Palfrey, a.k.a. the "D.C. Madam." Her trial on federal charges of prostitution-related racketeering and money laundering...
Stuck in the Iraq Loop
Byline: Fareed Zakaria We have achieved some security in Iraq. But we have not built a sustainable security architecture. There is a paradox in the current situation in Iraq. We are told that the surge has worked brilliantly and violence is way...
The Cult of the Volt
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Inventor Nikola Tesla didn't get much glory when he was alive, but to hipsters now, he's a real turn-on. There's a scene in the film "Coffee and Cigarettes" where Jack and Meg White, of the band the White Stripes, are discussing...
The Deep Blue Divide
Byline: Julia Baird; With Matthew Philips, Richard Wolffe And Martha Brant For months, Democrats were just thrilled with their choices. Now they can't even stand to sit together. For the past five years, a group of friends, mostly military wives...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Periodically over the past five years I've gotten together with our Baghdad correspondents when they're back on brief home leaves. For most of that time, their reports from the front have been grim. So I expected more of...
The Enemy Comes in from the Cold
Byline: Larry Kaplow Hawija is a mean town, decaying and sullen. Not long ago a sniper hit a soldier from Black Sheep Company while he was standing inside a downtown police station. But the company's commander, 32-year-old Capt. Quinn Eddy of the...
The Fight over How to Fight
Byline: Evan Thomas and John Barry; With Babak Dehghanpisheh And Larry Kaplow In Baghdad Should we prepare for big wars or small ones? After Afghanistan and Iraq, the answer might seem obvious, but the truth is harder and more expensive: both. ...
'The Fight That We Are in Now'
Byline: Larry Kaplow Capt. Neil Hollenbeck declines to second-guess whether America should have invaded Iraq. What he will say is this: "The reason we invaded Iraq to begin with and the reason we're fighting now are different. We're fighting different...
To Your Credit
Byline: Linda Stern The best new card offers are reserved for small-business owners. To Your Credit You can qualify for a small-business credit card even if your company is just one person based in a garage. It's a good idea to get a card...
Trying Times for Trinity
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Richard Wolffe, Elise Soukup, Suzanne Smalley And Karen Springen Barack Obama's church is under scrutiny. But what's it really like on the inside? NAM Y. HUH--AP (LEFT), JOSE MORE--CHICAGO TRIBUNE-MCT-LANDOV MAN OF...
Unintended Consequences
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff Spitzer got snagged by the fine print of the Patriot Act. When Congress passed the Patriot Act in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, law-enforcement agencies hailed it as a powerful tool to help track...
When Reason Meets Rifles
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick The last time the court issued a major decision on the right to bear arms was in 1939, when criminals wore fedoras. This week the Supreme Court will hear arguments in the most important gun-control case in 69 years. And...
Why We Can't Quit
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Even at $100 a barrel, oil is still cheaper than a Starbucks latte. At the age of 7, when most kids are climbing trees, John Hess was surveying foreign oilfields. The son of Leon Hess, a forceful entrepreneur who built...