Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 09, September 1

A Liberal's Lament
To win, Obama must convince the country that he is a man of substance, not just style. History suggests this won't be easy. Barack Obama has chosen to deliver the most important speech of his young political career in a setting that suits his spectacular...
An Unlikely Gambler
Byline: Evan Thomas, Eve Conant and Pat Wingert By firing bad teachers and paying good ones six-figure salaries, Michelle Rhee just might save D.C.'s schools. Not long after Michelle Rhee took over as head of the Washington, D.C., public schools...
Endless Summer
Byline: Anna Quindlen In the future, all presidential candidates should be sent to a secure, undisclosed location with lemonade and some Adam Smith. One night we went to dinner, and when we came down the driveway on our return, it was apparent...
How to Manage Moscow
Byline: Richard Haass; Haass, a NEWSWEEK contributor, is the president of the Council on Foreign Relations. Kicking Russia out of the G8 will solve nothing. We need to rope it into the international system. The situation on the ground in Georgia...
'I Had to Learn to Fight'
Obama's mom was an idealist, his stepdad a hardheaded realist, his father a myth. How all this shaped him. Late last Thursday afternoon, before announcing who will join him in the fall campaign against John McCain, Barack Obama spoke with NEWSWEEK's...
I'm Rubber, You're Glue
Byline: Jonathan Alter It's hard to predict what will stick. 'It's the economy, stupid' was a hand-scrawled sign hung in Little Rock. When NEWSWEEK reported earlier this summer that the McCain family owns at least seven houses, few outside the...
Making the Most of Mom
Byline: Howard Fineman On the trail, Barack Obama barely mentions his Kenyan father or his father's family. In town halls, commiserating about everyday struggles--health care, education, jobs--he'll say, "I have an experience about that," and then...
Meds Shmeds, Gimme Fries
Byline: Claudia Kalb One study found that 74 percent of teens dramatically overestimate their ability to manage their asthma. Some time ago I interviewed the mother of a teenage daughter with type 1 diabetes. We talked about her child's treatment,...
On His Own
Cerebral and cool, Obama is also steely, and his strength comes from the absence of a father. The making of a self-reliant man. The boxing gloves were new, and smelled of leather. It was the mid-1960s, in Jakarta, Indonesia. Barack Obama had come...
Perspectives
"If you're hanging off the edge of a cliff by a rope, you don't want to look up and see Joe Lieberman." Former President Clinton adviser Paul Begala, bashing the Democrat turned independent senator from Connecticut for agreeing to speak at the Republican...
Petraeus: The Exit Interview
Byline: Rod Nordland Gen. David Petraeus has no intention of doing a victory lap on his way out of Iraq. So when his aides proposed a valedictory interview with NEWSWEEK, they made it clear the theme would not pick up from this magazine's 2004 cover...
'Revenge of Benazir'
Byline: Lally Weymouth Asif Ali Zardari, once jailed on corruption charges, could be Pakistan's next president. Eighteen years ago, Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto lost her job for the first time, and her husband, Asif Ali Zardari, was...
Sex and the Single Girl
In her new memoir, "Epilogue," author Anne Roiphe chronicles her sudden widowhood and attempts, at age 72, to date again in the Internet era. She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Katie Baker. Have e-mail and the Web made things easier than when you dated as...
Silence on A 'Terror Gap'
Byline: Mark Hosenball Sen. John McCain portrays himself as a strong supporter of Second Amendment rights. But does that extend to gun rights for suspected terrorists? His campaign won't say where he stands on a bill to eliminate a gun-control loophole...
Solitude for McCain's Wordsmith
Byline: Holly Bailey Like any writer, Mark Salter has his comfort zone. He often rises before dawn to draft his boss's speeches, drinking coffee and chain-smoking Marlboro cigarettes in the quiet before the day gets hectic. Recently, he retreated...
Some like It Cool
He's been called hip, sexy and likened to a rock star. But the key to Obama's mystique is his earnest geekiness and sobriety. Seven months ago, as he drove me the lengthy route from Vero Beach to the airport in West Miami Beach: past abandoned citrus...
So What If He Were Muslim?
Byline: Ellis Cose We haven't fully accepted the notion that all religions should have equal access to the Oval Office. Once Barack Obama emerged as the Democratic candidate, it was clear the presidential contest would become a referendum on...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Political conventions have been an obsession of mine since my parents made the spectacularly unwise decision to dispatch me to summer camp in the midst of one. They atoned by sending me the convention issue of NEWSWEEK, which...
The Geography of Personality
Byline: Sharon Begley The Swiss rate themselves as highly conscientious; Indians and Canadians see themselves as agreeable. Next time you find yourself somewhere with lots of tourists, try to guess where they're from based only on their behavior...
The Politics of Prevention
Cancer screening and other measures for heading off disease don't always reduce health-care costs. Preventive care sounds like a win-win--conventional wisdom says it makes for both healthier patients and lower health-care costs. It's a favorite...
The Rise of Fantasy Politics
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Obama and McCain have each taken symbolic steps to suggest that they've made tough budget choices. Don't believe them. What we have here--to borrow a line from the old movie "Cool Hand Luke"-- is a failure to communicate....
The Tragic Bonds of War
Byline: Jason Cohen; Cohen is based at Fort Monmouth, N.J. As a fellow soldier, I share a special connection with my patients. When one dies, I lose a piece of myself. There is silence tonight in the hospital. It is a silence made denser by the...
The Veep's Pipeline Push
Byline: Michael Isikoff And Tony Hopfinger A two-year-old letter by Vice President Dick Cheney that pushed a controversial Alaska natural-gas pipeline bill is getting renewed scrutiny because of recently disclosed evidence in the Justice Department's...
What a Croc of Shoes
Byline: Steve Tuttle Our author learns that if you want to rile readers, skip Iraq and the election. Write about rubber clogs. Over the last couple of weeks I've received at least five marriage proposals and a couple of death threats. One guy...
What Will the Neighbors Think?
Obama's defeat would say that when handed a perfect opportunity to put the worst part of our history behind us, we chose not to. What with the Bush legacy of reckless war and economic mismanagement, 2008 is a year that favors the generic Democratic...