Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 16, October 20

A Business Champion
He's led Major League Baseball and the Olympics. If they awarded gold medals in the game of business, Peter Ueberroth would have several. In his 20s, he founded a travel company that he grew to become America's second largest. Next he served as...
A Guantanamo Homecoming
It will be harder to tune them out when they are not just nameless men behind barbed wire. What happens at Gitmo, stays at Gitmo. That was always the hope. When the Bush administration fenced off a dusty little patch of lawlessness in Cuba, the...
Assembly Required
The 'factory girls' at the forefront of China's mass migration are not all cut from the same cloth. China's rural to urban migration is the largest in human history, involving some 130 million workers--three times the number of people who immigrated...
Bad? It's Just A Flesh Wound
Byline: Steve Tuttle The new NEWSWEEK poll shows that 86 percent of adult Americans are "dissatisfied with the way things are going" in this country. That is a shocking number, but what's even more incredible is that 10 percent of American citizens...
Chesney's Heartbreak Hotel
Country singers need heartbreak like pastrami needs mustard, but Kenny Chesney's new album, "Lucky Old Sun," is extra spicy: he wrote it after his marriage to Renee Zellweger was annulled in 2005. Chesney spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. You're late! ...
Crushed by the Elephant
Byline: Jonathan Alter Picking Palin was a confession that McCain did not have control of the Republican Party. In a season of ironies, the greatest of all might be that John McCain lacks the toughness to get elected president. During the summer,...
Demur, Dodge, Punt
Byline: Howard Fineman You can't blame Tom Brokaw for trying. In the second presidential debate, he asked Barack Obama and John McCain an obvious question with an all-too-obvious answer: will the economy get worse before it gets better? "No," said...
Don't Forget the Purell
Byline: Daniel McGinn Selling foreclosed homes is a growth industry for brokers. But some of the properties are disgusting. If you're looking to buy a cheap home in suburban Boston and find yourself looking at one of Christina Lazrak's listings,...
Down in the Valley
Byline: Daniel Lyons The storm is on Wall Street, but it's rippling out to Silicon Valley and causing investors to be more cautious. As if waking from a dream, Silicon Valley has suddenly realized that the collapsing economy means trouble for...
End of the 'Ownership Society'
Remember the ownership society? President George W. Bush championed the concept when he was running for re-election in 2004, envisioning a world in which every American family owned a house and a stock portfolio, and government stayed out of the way...
Facebook's Roar Becomes a Meow
Byline: Daniel Lyons Putting ads in front of Facebook users is like hanging out at a party and interrupting conversations to hawk merchandise. Facebook was going to become the new Google, the Silicon Valley hypemeisters claimed. Millions of people...
From Man to Mockery, and Back Again
Byline: Alan Brinkley; Brinkley is the Allan Nevins professor of history at Columbia. In 'W.,' Oliver Stone approaches his subject as a historian, not just a filmmaker. The widely reviled Bush comes off better than you'd think. Through most of...
Here We Go Again-Maybe
The election is far from over, but the historical handicapping has already begun. Will 2008 be the liberals' 1980? Or not? Liberals are trying to determine whether this election will be more like 1952 or 1980. In '52, Dwight Eisenhower-- an immensely...
Hoist One Last Glass
Byline: William Underhill Can Britain still be Britain without its pubs? William Ward lives only a few steps from one of London's favorite drinking spots, a venerable pub called the Museum Tavern. Its clientele has reputedly included Karl Marx,...
I Am Not A Babysitter
Byline: Heather Robinson; Robinson lives in Dallas. As a teacher, I face many stereotypes about my job. But I wouldn't trade my career for any other. It is said that teaching is the profession that creates all other professions. That's a beautiful...
If You Build It, Will They Pay?
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts and Andrew Murr Luxury stadiums are on the rise. A top seat can cost $150,000. Beer costs extra. Two diligent, if hapless, would-be sports entrepreneurs couldn't resist the pecuniary opportunity at hand. It was April...
In Zealots We Trust
Historian Sarah Vowell has earned a following with her particular blend of irreverence and patriotism. In her new book, "The Wordy Shipmates," she profiles the Puritans who fought America's original battle between church and state. She spoke with NEWSWEEK's...
No Prize to the Noble Loser
Byline: Holly Bailey Steve Schmidt knows what he was hired to do, but the pursuit of victory is never pretty. If you want to really irritate Steve Schmidt (and seeing that he's 6 feet, 225 pounds, and can show a flash of temper, it's not recommended),...
Not Much Dubya in Stone's 'W.'
Byline: David Ansen Little in this movie to love and almost no reason to care Two weeks ago, on Anderson Cooper's show on CNN, Paul Begala called the president of the United States "a high-functioning moron." Nobody on the show, which included...
Ok, You Two, What Would You Do to Solve This Mess?
Byline: Michael Hirsh; With Mark Hosenball and Suzanne Smalley Obama and McCain have taken different tacks to handling the meltdown. It's not by accident. How their economic gurus shape their views. Barack Obama was in "governing mode," says...
Perspectives
"I'm trying to go around minefields these days and not blunder into them. But I do think you have to talk to enemies." Gen. David Petraeus, in a speech about Afghanistan and the Taliban, adding that his espousal of a foreign-policy view shared by...
Ready, Aim, Fire!
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Jeneen Interlandi Attack ads are ubiquitous this campaign season, but they are not the threat to the electoral process that do-gooders claim. Barack Obama has been "palling around with terrorists" and wants to teach...
Shane, Come Back!
Byline: George F. Will The new movie 'Appaloosa' is welcome evidence that the Western genre is not wrapped in white linen and cold as the clay. As this hard-fought, high-stakes presidential campaign reaches its closing crescendo, one question...
Shivs You Can Believe In
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Michael Isikoff; With Sarah Kliff The real test for any strategist: calibrating positive and negative. How David Axelrod will maintain the 'brand.' IT'S a bit of wisdom that Barack Obama has cited himself, but it's...
Slaves in the Family
Byline: Malcolm Jones A writer discovers the master potter in his past. In February 1919, Capt. Samuel G. Stoney donated an enormous stoneware jug to the Charleston Museum in South Carolina. No one at the museum had any notion where the jug,...
The Anatomy of Fear
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Temma Ehrenfeld, Matthew Philips and Ashley Harris in New York, and Daniel Stone in Washington The technology that transmits odors and fragrances digitally is still in the very early stages of development. But on Monday,...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham When he had been written off early in the primary season, John McCain liked to cite a quotation often attributed to Mao: "It is always darkest before it is totally dark." For the country, the words seem more apt than ever this...
The Man Who Would Be Our King
Byline: Kurt Soller The children of Paul Emery Washington think of their father as an unpretentious guy who climbed the corporate ladder to become regional manager at CertainTeed manufacturing. Now 82, the Texas native takes care of his wife, who...
The New Space Race
Byline: Mary Hennock, Adam B. Kushner and Jason Overdorf; With Akiko Kashiwagi in Tokyo China is catching up to the U.S. and Russia. And its neighbors in the region are competing as well. For China, the Olympics was only first in a summer of...
There Is a Silver Lining
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Some of us--especially those under 60--have always wondered what it would be like to live through the kind of epochal event one reads about in books. Well, this is it. We're now living history, suffering one of the greatest...
The Trouble with Homeownership
It's good for the community but not the wisest investment. In America we draw a connection between owning a home and being a good citizen. We've evolved from a feudal society, in which those who didn't own land were almost like slaves, to one in...
To Watch the Watchers
Byline: Christopher Werth Artist-hackers in Britain and elsewhere are using camera-surveillance images for their own purposes. Britain has been crowned the most-watched society in the world. The country boasts 4.2 million security cameras (one...
Troopergate: Not over Yet
Byline: Michael Isikoff A new Alaska legislative report finding that Gov. Sarah Palin abused her power and violated state ethics laws spells new trouble for the McCain campaign. Special counsel Steve Branchflower's report could lead to fines or...
Upper East Sliders
Byline: Holly Peterson Where cutting back means ditching the private jet. How the superrich are surviving tough times. If you'd wanted to gauge the mood of Manhattan's richest people in the midst of the economic meltdown, you might have dropped...
What's God Got to Do with It?
Byline: Lisa Miller Her relationship advice is retrograde dross. Submit to your man, or at least pretend, and then do what you want. In her new book, "Love Your Life," Victoria Osteen tells the following story. When she and her husband, Joel,...
Yes, It's A Wreck, but We Can Fix It
NEWSWEEK's Business Roundtable looks at why the government's efforts to right the economy haven't yet worked--and what might do the trick. The Rearview Mirror Craig Barrett, chairman of the board of Intel First all the headlines, political...