Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 18, November 3

A Cure for the Long-Gone Lonesome Blues
Byline: Lorraine Ali Jett Williams never met her father, Hank. Then she came across his lost recordings, and she heard him laugh at last. According to Hank Williams, Mother's Best Flour makes "the best biscuit you ever hung a tooth in," and "On...
Britain's Comeback Kid
Byline: Lally Weymouth Prime Minister Gordon Brown was sinking in the polls, until world markets plunged even further. His star was thought to be waning, but ever since the global financial crisis broke, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has...
Cash Is the New Black
Byline: Jessica Ramirez Hard times mean the rich are selling a few Cartiers. There's very little that can come between Melanie Fascitelli and designer labels like Missoni and Jimmy Choo. The successful 32-year-old New Yorker--like many of the...
Click in Remembrance of Me
Byline: Lisa Miller 'How can we provide authentic worship through the Web for people who are not part of the church?' With a scrap of bagel and a sip of Crystal Light, Beth McDonald gave communion to her husband. Then, after a blessing, he gave...
Clothes Make the Ice Man
Byline: Marc Peyser You might say that Sean Avery is the human equivalent of jock itch. It's his job, as the baddest badass in the National Hockey League, to annoy his opponents, to get under their skin--anything to gain an edge. Like the time he...
Cures for the Health-Care Headache: McCain
The Republican's plan means big changes for the employer-based health-insurance system. Some say it would cover more than 21 million people without insurance. Critics say it would mean more uninsured. 'I want to leave money in your pocket. I want...
Cures for the Health-Care Headache: Obama
The Democrat's plan would mean more government programs and between 26 million and 34 million more people with health insurance. Opponents say it would also mean higher health-care costs. 'Now is the time to keep the promise of affordable, accessible...
Diet Trick: Stop Eating
Byline: Karen Springen and Anna Kuchment Saint Augustine once said that "fasting cleanses the soul [and] raises the mind." Were he alive today, he might be surprised to see the fast detached from its spiritual roots and transformed into little more...
Don't Toss out That Old Gadget
Byline: Lily Huang Good design can mean dated products can have renewable life cycles. Over the summer, a really cool piece of gadgetry went on the market and, in the mere blink of three days, into more than a million pockets. New buyers' attitudes...
From Aisle 3 to the Top
Best Buy's president started out as a sales associate. When Brian Dunn began working as a sales associate at Best Buy in 1985, the company had just a handful of stores, the clerks wore skinny leather ties, and VCRs constituted cutting-edge technology....
Happy Birthday, Harvard B-School
Byline: Daniel Mcginn For a century, the place been turning out corporate leaders. But it's not all cause for celebration. The institution has flaws, and now's the time to address them. As birthdays go, the centennial that took place at Harvard...
How a Tiny Toy Makes Big Bucks
Byline: Keith Naughton; With Patrick Crowley Hot Wheels are hot again. Parent company Mattel is now worth more than GM. Got an old Beach Bomb VW model in the attic? You're rich! On weekends, Edwin Norman likes to hit the Richwood Flea Market...
In Search of a New Road Map
Individual governments are trying to manage the global financial crisis. What's really needed is a gathering of high-level experts to report back in a few months. Despite officials' best efforts to fight raging financial fires, it's a good bet the...
It Costs More to Save
Byline: Sameer Reddy Eco-elitism comes with a price tag. That dress made of leaves and flowers will be dead by morning. Between Brad Pitt's new biodegradable body wash for Kiehl's and recent green issues of glossy magazines like Vanity Fair,...
Lots of Woe: Car Dealers in Crisis
Byline: Keith Naughton; With Hilary Shenfeld Ten percent of U.S. showrooms could be gone by late 2009. WAL-Mart might not have difficulty selling Hot Wheels this year, but auto dealers are struggling to move the real thing. Just ask Gary Bell...
Meet Radio's Newest Soloist
Byline: Allison Samuels Jamie Foxx--actor, singer, comedian--has his fingerprints all over Hollywood. His latest gig: Sirius Radio's "The Foxxhole." He spoke with Allison Samuels. What made you want to do radio? Dick Gregory told me about...
Not the Change They Wanted
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Suzanne Smalley The disclosure that the Republican National Committee spent more than $150,000 on clothing and accessories for vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and her family set off recriminations among GOP officials--and,...
Nukes: Too Deep to Hit
Byline: Mark Hosenball Western intelligence experts believe that Iran's nuclear facilities are so deep underground that it would be difficult for Israel to wipe them out, or even significantly damage them, with a quick airstrike. In order to deal...
Perspectives
"Down in money, down in the polls, we got 'em just where we want 'em." Sen. John McCain, embracing his underdog status in a joint interview with Gov. Sarah Palin on NBC "Nightly News" "Mark my words. It will not be six months before the world...
Piper, Please Don't Drop Him
Byline: Kathleen Deveny; With Tara Weingarten I sometimes say things that I later regret. We all behave differently with our kids when we think no one is watching. I'M STILL A LITTLE OBSESSED WITH SARAH PALIN'S FAMILY. I'M most interested in...
Shifting Gears at Dell
Byline: Benjamin Sutherland The PC maker used to be an industry icon. Now it's had to remake its marketing and manufacturing. Dell Computer soared to the top of the PC industry in the 1980s and '90s by innovating not so much on the machines but...
Stomping through A Medical Minefield
Byline: Claudia Kalb The author of a new book about autism says exactly what he thinks about vaccines and other hot topics. Paul Offit--salt-and-pepper hair, wire-rimmed glasses, Phillies fan--hardly seems like the kind of guy who'd receive a...
'That Was Amateur Night'
Byline: John Barry Robert Gates dueled with the Soviets, but even he's daunted by today's challenges. Some of Barack Obama's advisers have talked publicly of keeping on Robert Gates as secretary of defense in a Democratic administration. Gates,...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Free advice is often worth what you pay for it, and it is funny how people who do not have a particular job are full of wisdom about how to do it. (You can apply the same point to, say, in-laws, marriage and child rearing.) In...
The Good Bad News
Byline: George F. Will If the nation wants a really Rooseveltian intervention in the economy, it should celebrate Thanksgiving this Thursday. Two axioms: all news is economic news. And economic news is always bad. All news is economic news because...
The Palin Problem
Byline: Jonathan Darman If McCain loses, the GOP will have a head vs. heart decision to make about the party's veep pick. John McCain's defeat will be a lonely one. The old soldier has always taken pride in proving no one owns him--not his party,...
The Queen of Denial
Byline: Louisa Thomas Men have long vilified Cleopatra, but she's earned a royal treatment. Cleopatra has always been a player in other people's dramas, if in different roles: she can be a coquette or a feminist, a martyr or a villain, a goddess...
The Right Way Back
MEMORANDUM TO: The president-elect RE: The economy FROM: Michael R. Bloomberg, Mayor of New York City The stock market has plummeted. The credit markets are frozen. Unemployment is rising. Housing foreclosures are skyrocketing. Consumer...
The Rupe Faux Kerfuffle
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Vanity Fair columnist Michael Wolff's new book, "The Man Who Owns the News: Inside the Secret World of Rupert Murdoch," won't hit bookstores for another month. But in a time-honored publishing-industry tactic, the book...
The Truth about Eating
Byline: Karen Springen; Karen Springen It's the season to avoid temptation: the kids' leftover Halloween candy, the pumpkin pies, the holiday cookies. To help you keep off extra pounds during the holidays, TIP SHEET debunks common nutrition myths:...
The View from 'Nowhere'
Byline: Dave Kiffer; Kiffer is the newly elected mayor of the Ketchikan Gateway Borough. Our town in Alaska sorely needed a bridge to its airport. Instead, we became a national punch line. Two years ago the small Alaska town of Ketchikan, where...
The World That Awaits
MEMORANDUM TO: The president-elect RE: Foreign policy FROM: Richard N. Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations There are only two and a half months--76 days, to be precise-- between Election Day and your Inauguration, and you...
Thrift Is the New Fashion
Byline: Daniel Gross Time was, national crises stimulated saving. But thrift today has a negative, miserly connotation. Thrift, like the repossession business, is one of those classic countercyclical industries. When the gross domestic product...
Vice: The Recession-Proof Bet
Byline: Eve Conant It's 8:30 p.m., the stock market is down 700 points, and Rick's Cabaret in Manhattan is packed. Drinks are flowing, women in electric-blue gowns are peeling off layers onstage, and if the Wall Street clientele is stressed, the...
We Say We Want A Revolution
On Nov. 4, Barack Obama will be elected as the next president of the United States. The real excitement won't come from watching that foregone conclusion come to pass. No, the big question is, will Democrats nationwide simply "win" the night--or will...
We Should Talk to Our Enemies
One of the sharpest and most telling differences on foreign policy between Barack Obama and John McCain is whether the United States should talk to difficult and disreputable leaders like Iran's Mahmoud Ahmadinejad or Venezuela's Hugo Chavez. In each...
What Have We Created?!
Byline: Howard Fineman It is eerily quiet at Barack Obama's headquarters, an open expanse that takes up the entire 11th floor of an office tower in Chicago's Loop. It's nearly as silent as a study hall, which is appropriate, since most of the 20-...
Why McCain Won
Byline: Jonathan Alter Snatching Defeat From The Jaws Of Victory: How That Scenario Could (But Likely Won't) Play Out. The conventional wisdom, which I share, is that Barack Obama will win this election, perhaps by a healthy margin. But Democrats...
Why Obama Needs a Tina Fey
Byline: Joshua Alston What good is political satire if comedians shy away from the biggest target? If self-sacrifice is the mark of a true patriot, then Mike Barker is an American-flag pin incarnate. Barker is an executive producer of "American...
Why We Believe
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Karen Springen in Chicago and Kurt Soller in New York Belief in the paranormal reflects normal brain activity carried to an extreme. It wasn't immediately obvious to Walter Semkiw that he was the reincarnation of John...
Why We Need Wingtip Warriors
Both sides have elite lawyers on standby in case the election goes into constitutional overtime. It's become a truism of elections that both camps "lawyer up" before the big day. Briefcase to briefcase, wingtip to wingtip, both Barack Obama's and...