Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 08, February 22

America, Inc
Byline: Andrew Romano and Michael Hirsh A bumper crop of CEO politicians are campaigning to run the country like a bottom-line business. To hear Jon Corzine tell it, Meg Whitman is either deceiving us or deceiving herself. Like Whitman, the former...
Are Biopics History?
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Charles Darwin has finally succumbed to the survival of the fittest. Creation, a movie about the creation of On the Origin of Species, was practically extinct on its arrival in late January--it's made only $140,241 as of last...
A Separate Peace
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Why veterans deserve special courts. The problem is hardly a new one, but we need only watch The Hurt Locker to refresh our collective memory: veterans return from war, having seen and survived unspeakable things, then...
Black and Blue at the Times
Byline: Ellis Cose A top editor's bruising experience. There is no such thing as a happy or rationally run newsroom. Anyone who has worked in journalism pretty much assumes that. But could America's greatest newspaper really be led by such vicious,...
Edward Dolman: 'Death, Debt, and Divorce'
Byline: Richard M. Smith The CEO of Christie's on what drives the art market--even in a downturn. Sotheby's $104.3 million sale of the Alberto Giacometti statute Walking Man I this month showed that despite the recession, the art market is far...
From Backwater to Trailblazer in India
Byline: Jason Overdorf For years the rural, densly populated Indian state of Bihar has been synonymous with epic dysfunction. Once the seat of one of the world's most glorious empires, Bihar by the 1970s had fallen prey to government neglect, feudalism,...
Harvard's Crisis of Faith
Byline: Lisa Miller Can a secular university embrace religion without sacrificing its soul? It doesn't take a degree from Harvard to see that in today's world, a person needs to know something about religion. The conflicts between the Israelis...
Medici in Chief
Byline: Jeremy McCarter The NEA has spent years quietly nursing its culture-war wounds. Then Rocco Landesman took over. There are dozens of federal agencies in Washington, D.C., and dozens of men and women running them, but it's hard to imagine...
Premature Triumphalism
Byline: George F. Will The GOP looks away from Dixieland. Giddy since their election of a senator from Massachusetts, Republicans have visions of political sugarplums dancing in their heads. Their arithmetic of optimism begins with the fact that...
Proud(ish) to Be American
Byline: Daniel Gross Maybe we aren't doing so badly. When I visited Toyota's Tsutsumi plant in Toyota City last summer, it was as if I'd entered a bizarro auto world. Back then, America's carmakers were effectively wards of the state, technological...
Seeking a Moral Compass
Byline: Julia Baird Will the recession change us? Mahatma Gandhi admired the Boston Tea Party protesters, fondly referring to them during his campaign against the oppressive salt tax imposed on Indians by their British rulers. To him, such taxes...
Terror Begins at Home
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Fearmongering politicians are scoring cheap political points at the expense of the American people. Jostling before the midterms has begun, and so too has the GOP's ritualistic hazing of Democrats on national security....
The Boom Is Nigh
Byline: Gregg Easterbrook Why the coming recovery will hurt like hell. Home prices keep falling, but productivity is rising fast. GDP grew 5.6apercent in the fourth quarter, yet unemployment remains stubbornly high. Inflation is nonexistent,...
The Iceman Cometh
Byline: Howard Fineman He's cool, calm, and out to get Obama. The blizzard had paralyzed Washington. So it was an apt day for a chat (by phone) with Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Kentucky Republican who is working successfully--yet with surprisingly...
The Jihad against the Jihadis
Byline: Fareed Zakaria How moderate Muslim leaders waged war on extremists--and won. September 11, 2001, was gruesome enough on its own terms, but for many of us, the real fear was of what might follow. Not only had Al Qaeda shown it was capable...
The System's Not to Blame. We Are
Byline: Jon Meacham I am generally skeptical about the likelihood of rapid wholesale political or cultural change. Perhaps my reservations that the world can suddenly reform and redeem itself comes from a habit of seeing things historically, a perspective...
The World's Most Successful Failure
Byline: Mary Carmichael Iceland's deCODE has discovered more genes than any other company on earth. If only it could turn a profit. During the late 1990s, it was an article of faith that the decade ahead would be the Age of Biotech, an era when...
Too Close for Comfort?
Reassessing America's special relationship with Israel. Eleven minutes after Israel announced its independence in 1948, President Harry Truman recognized the new state, and American support has been crucial to -Israel's survival and a cornerstone...
Toyota's Murky Data
Byline: Matthew Philips Whenever an airplane crashes, investigators focus on the black-box data, which may explain why the plane went down. Though most drivers don't realize it, two thirds of new U.S. automobiles have black boxes, too. They're called...
Turning the Taliban
Byline: Ron Moreau and Sami Yousafzai Pacifying insurgents with jobs and money is central to our strategy in Afghanistan. It's also misguided. Huddled in the unheated, mud-walled room that serves as the dormitory of their madrassa, not far from...
Was It All Downhill from There?
Byline: Research by Tony Dokoupil Six countries have eked out only a single Winter Olympic medal each. But for their triumphant athletes, life after competition hasn't always been a victory lap. Ion Panturu and Nicolae Neagoe Romania, Bronze...
We Need More Lobbyists
Byline: Nick Allard; Allard leads the lobbying practice of the law firm Patton Boggs in Washington, D.C. Surviving as a lobbyist requires thick skin. But in recent years, the age-old attacks on my profession have escalated into a populist crusade....